Drinks

Punch, Toddy, Grog & Co. – Part 10: Sangaree

Sangria & Sangaree - Titelbild.

Sangaree is clearly defined in an EU regulation and people knew what it was as early as 1736. However, it was mostly prepared incorrectly and there has been a lot of confusion about what it means for centuries. In this post, we look at the history of this mixed drink and explain how to prepare it correctly.

Mr. Gordon’s invention

The Gentleman's Magazine. Vol. 6. London, 1736, page 550-551.
The Gentleman’s Magazine. Vol. 6. London, 1736, page 550-551. [1-550] [1-551]

The first reference to a Sangaree can be found in The Gentleman’s Magazine from 1736. It is an entertaining text that tells us about the consequences of the Gin Act, which was supposed to ban the sale of small quantities of gin (also called Madame Genevy). There were riots, changes of profession and trickery to get around the law. But read for yourself: “The time approaching for putting a Stop to the Retailing of distill’d Spirituous Liquors in small Quantities, the Persons who kept Shop for that purpose began to make a Parade of mock Ceremonies for Madam Geneva’s Lying-in State, which created a Mob about their Shops, and the Justices thought proper to commit some of the chief Mourners to Prison. The Signs also of Punch-Houses were put in mourning; and left others should express the Bitterness of their Hearts by committing Violences, the Horse and Foot-Guards and Train’s-Bands were order’d to be properly station’d. But many of the Distillers, instead of spending their Time in empty Lamentations betook themselves to other Branches of Industry; some to the Brewing Trade which raised the Price of Barley and Hops; some took Taverns in the Universities, which no Body could do before this Gin-Act, without Leave of the Vice-Chancellor; others set up Apothecaries Shops: only Mr Ashley of the London Punch-House, and one more, had took out 50 l. Licenses (See p. 195 C). Mr Gordon, a Punch-seller in the Strand, had devised a new Punch made of strong Madeira Wine, and called Sangre. Others pretend, That Contracting for Two Gallons of Brandy, or any Spirituous Liquors, is fairly Buying and Selling it, and if the Buyer takes only part of the said Two Gallons, and the Seller gives Credit and Warehouse-room for the rest of it, who has to do with it? ‘Tis an universal Custom in all Trades; which no Law can prevent.” [1-550] [1-551] [3]

The Sangaree was thus created in response to the Gin Act, which came into force in 1736. This act introduced a retail tax on gin and annual licences for gin sellers. An excise duty of 20 shillings was levied per gallon of gin and an annual licence fee of £50 for all gin sellers. However, the act was largely disregarded and was repealed in 1743. [3]

Ephraim Chambers Cyclopaedia, 1728, page 910.
Ephraim Chambers Cyclopaedia, 1728, page 910. [13-910]

Mr. Gordon got creative and prepared the punch no longer with a distillate, but with a Madeira wine. Unfortunately, the ingredients for this punch are not mentioned. We only learn that it was a Madeira wine punch. However, in  our analysis of the Punch we found out what a punch is: a Classic Punch is prepared from a spirit, water, sugar and citrus juice, optionally spices such as nutmeg can be added. We may therefore assume that the Madeira punch consisted of Madeira, sugar and citrus juice and was perhaps spiced with nutmeg. Additional water may not have been added, depending on the alcohol content of the finished punch. Looking more closely at the circumstances of the time, it is likely that the Madeira punch was prepared without nutmeg. This statement is supported by a dictionary published in London in 1728, which does not mention nutmeg or any other spice in the definition of what a Punch is. [13-910]

Ephraim Chambers: Cyclopaedia, 1728, page 644.
Ephraim Chambers: Cyclopaedia, 1728, page 644. [13-644]

The same encyclopaedia also reports that the entire trade in nutmeg was in the hands of the Dutch East India Company. [13-644] We will see in the following analysis of the handed-down recipes whether it is possible to say more precisely whether spices belong in the Sangaree.

Now, to clarify what a Sangaree really is, what variations there are and how it may have changed over time, let’s first look at what was published in the 18th and 19th centuries and then a statistical evaluation of the recipes for whiskey and rum Sangaree that have been handed down.

The Sangaree in the 18th century

Anonymus: Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society, for the year 1800. Boston, 1801, page 184-185.
Anonymous: Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society, for the year 1800. Boston, 1801, page 184-185. [20-184] [20-185]

The Sangaree must have been popular very quickly. Only eight years after its “invention” by Mr Gordon, it was also drunk in Virginia in 1744: “Monday morning, 25th June, 1744. At 10 o’clock, the Indian sachems met the Governor, the honourable commissioners of Virginia, and those of this province, when his Honour made them a speech, * to which Cannasateego returned an answer in behalf of all others present. The Indians staid in the court-house about two hours; and were regaled with some bumbo and sangree.[20-184] [20-185]

 

Israel Acrelius: A history of New Sweden. Philadelphia, 1874, page 160.
Israel Acrelius: A history of New Sweden. Philadelphia, 1874, page 160. [4-160]

In 1759 [11] it is written: “Sangaree is made of wine, water, sugar, a dash of nutmeg, with some leaves of balm put in.[4-160]

Francis Grose: A Classical Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue. London, 1788.
Francis Grose: A Classical Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue. London, 1788. [5]

If one studies the handed-down texts, a Sangaree was prepared with wine in the vast majority of cases. One of the few exceptions is a dictionary published in London in 1785 which says: “SANGAREE. Rack punch was formerly so called in bagnios.” So it is defined as a Punch made with arrak, which would formerly have been called Sangaree in brothels. [5] Unfortunately, we are not told what kind of brothels are meant in which place. It is surprising that arrack is given instead of Madeira wine. Was arrack perhaps cheaper and used to maximise profits? However, this example shows quite well that there was a lack of clarity early on about what a Sangaree actually is.

Johann David Schöpf: Reise durch einige der mittlern und südlichen vereinigten nordamerikanischen Staaten. Erlangen, 1788, page 347.
Johann David Schöpf: Reise durch einige der mittlern und südlichen vereinigten nordamerikanischen Staaten. Erlangen, 1788, page 347. [12-347]

1788 Johann David Schöpf writes about his “Journey through some of the central and southern united North American states, to East=Florida and the Bahama=Islands, undertaken in the years 1783 and 1784” (“Reise durch einige der mittleren und südlichen vereinigten nordamerikanischen Staaten, nach Ost=Florida und den Bahama=Inseln, unternommen in den Jahren 1783 und 1784“): “Sangry is made from wine, sugar, water and a little nutmeg“.

– „aus Wein, Zucker, Wasser und etwas Muskatennuß entsteht Sangry“. [12-347]

John Gabriel Stedtmann: Narrative, of a five years' expedition ... . London, 1796, page 293.
John Gabriel Stedtmann: Narrative, of a five years’ expedition … . London, 1796, page 293. [6-293]

John Gabriel Stedtmann reports how things are in Paramaribo in Surinam, located in South America, from 10 o’clock in the evening in 1794: “At this time the ladies begin to make their appearance, who are particularly fond of a têtê-à-têtê by moon-light, when they entertain with Sherbet, Sangaree*, and wine and water; … * Water, Madeira wine, nutmeg and sugar.” [6-293]

John Gabriel Stedtmann: Narrative, of a five years' expedition ... . London, 1796, page 295-296.
John Gabriel Stedtmann: Narrative, of a five years’ expedition … . London, 1796, page 295-296. [6-295] [6-296]

It also says: “Thus I have known slaves in Surinam, who have bought slaves for their own use. Some purchase their freedom from their masters, whilst others keep their money, preferring to be the slave of an indulgent master; being, so long as they continue slaves, free from all duties and taxes, which, in case of manumission, they become liable to. A particular instance of this kind was a negro blacksmith, named Joseph … . This man had several slaves of his own, kept a decent house, with handsome furniture, and some plate; and when visited by his humane master or mistress, entertained them with Sangaree, port or claret.” [6-295] [6-296]

So Mr Gordon’s Wine Punch has made it to South America in just under 40 years, and fortunately our previous assumption is basically confirmed. According to this report, it is made with water, Madeira wine, nutmeg and sugar. Unfortunately, lemon is not mentioned.

Leonhard Ludwig Finke: Versuch einer allegemeinen medicinisch-praktischen Geographie. Dritter Band. Leipzig, 1792, page 172.
Leonhard Ludwig Finke: Versuch einer allegemeinen medicinisch-praktischen Geographie. Dritter Band. Leipzig, 1792, page 172. [16-172]

Johann Ludwig Finke reports in his 1795 description of South Carolina that a sangry consists of “wine, sugar, water and a little nutmeg“. [16-172]

– „Wein, Zucker, Wasser und etwas Muskatennuss“. [16-172]

George Pinckard: Notes on the West Indies. Vol. 2. London, 1806, page 102-103.
George Pinckard: Notes on the West Indies. Vol. 2. London, 1806, page 102-103. [9-102] [9-103]

George Pinckard reports on conditions in Barbados in 1796: [8] “The liquors most in use are Madeira and claret wines, punch, sangaree, porter, and cyder. Punch and sangaree are commonly taken as the diluents of the morning. The latter forms a most delightful drink. A glass of it, taken when parching with thirst, from heat and fatigue, may be ranked among the highest gratifications of our nature! At such a moment, a draught of sangaree approaches nearer, perhaps, to god-like nectar, than any other known liquor. It consists of half Madeira wine and half water, acidulated with the fragant lime, sweetened with sugar, and flavoured with nutmeg. A stronger sort of it is sometimes drank under the superlative name of sangrorum This differs from the former only in containing a greater proportion of wine.” [9-102] [9-103]

So we can see from the sources that in the 18th century a Sangree was usually a wine punch.

Sangaree in the first half of the 19th century.

In the 19th century, the sources become more frequent. For a better overview, we group them to better see connections.

Spiced Wine Punch

First of all, the Sangaree is of course described as a Wine Punch.

The mirror of literature, amusement, and instruction. Volume 4, 1824, page 63-64.
The mirror of literature, amusement, and instruction. Volume 4, 1824, page 63-64. [25-63] [25-64]

1824 one states: “SANGAREE is the name common in India for a very pleasant and enticing beverage, formerly much in fashion among the Europeans, and too often drank to the injury of health. It is composed of about three parts of Madeira wine, and one of water; to which is added, a slice or two of lime, or lemon, some grated nutmeg, ginger, and sugar.” [25-63] [25-64]

Anonymus: Marly, Or, A Planter's Life in Jamaica. Glasgow, 1828, page 358.
Anonymus: Marly, Or, A Planter’s Life in Jamaica. Glasgow, 1828, page 358. [26-358]

In 1828, a report on Jamaica states: “but instead of sangaree he made sangrorum, or a beveridge of half wine and half water, with sugar, nutmeg, and lime juice. The drink was rather powerful”. [26-358]

Anonymus: Modern domestic cookery. London, 1853, page 485.
Anonymus: Modern domestic cookery. London, 1853, page 485. [38-485]

In 1853, it is written in a cookbook: “NEGUS. 1 bottle of wine, 1/2 lb. of sugar, and a lemon sliced. Pour 3 pints of boiling water upon this mixture, and grate nutmeg to the taste. … The negus may be made of either white or red wine; and, if drunk cold, is called “sangaree.”” [38-485]

This is a quote that needs explanation. For it is mistaken. The recipe given is that of a Wine Punch and thus a Sangaree. A Negus, however, as we will show in the following post, is something else, namely a mixture of wine and water. We will return to the confusion regarding the Negus later.

Sarah Josepha Hale: Mrs. Hale's receipts for the million. Philadelphia, 1857, page 610.
Sarah Josepha Hale: Mrs. Hale’s receipts for the million. Philadelphia, 1857, page 610. [41-610]

1857 another cookbook writes: “Sangaree. – Mix a bottle of Marsala wine with a bottle and a half of iced water, sweeten with loaf sugar, and flavor with lemon-juice and grated nutmeg.” [41-610]

In a deviation from these “complete” Punch recipes, there are now variants in which one ingredient is missing.

Plain Wine Punch

There are also the Punch variants without spice:

Samuel Morewood: An essay on the inventions and customs of both ancients and moderns in the use of inebriating liquors. London, 1824, page 168.
Samuel Morewood: An essay on the inventions and customs of both ancients and moderns in the use of inebriating liquors. London, 1824, page 168. [23-168]

1824 is written about Barbados: “Madeira, claret, punch, porter, and cider, are favourite liquors in many of the islands, as also a drink called sangaree, which consists of half Madeira and half water, acidulated with lime-juice and sweetened with sugar. [23-168]

Thomas Webster: An encyclopædia of domestic economy. London, 1844, page 695.
Thomas Webster: An encyclopædia of domestic economy. London, 1844, page 695. [35-695]

In 1844, an encyclopaedia states:- „Sangaree is a kind of punch frequently drunk in the West Indies, and is composed of half Madeira and half water, acidulated with lime-juice and sweetened with sugar.“ [35-695]

“Wine Punch” without lemon

Some recipes do not contain lemon. Strictly speaking, they can therefore no longer be a Punch. These recipes exemplify how the clear definitions of not only a Punch became more and more blurred in the course of time, so that in the end only a confusion remained, in which one designation named everything and nothing at the same time.

Anonymus: Authentic history of English West Indies. London, 1810, page 58
Anonymus: Authentic history of English West Indies. London, 1810, page 58. [21-58]

In 1810 a work on the history of the West Indies states: “sangaree, which is composed of Madeira wine, nutmeg, sugar, and water.” [21-58]

John C. Gunn: Gunn's domestic medicine, or Poor man's friend. Knockville, 1833, page 219.
John C. Gunn: Gunn’s domestic medicine, or Poor man’s friend. Knockville, 1833, page 219. [29-219]

In 1833, a medicine book speaks of “Wine SANGAREE, made with warm water, wine, sugar and nutmeg”. [29-219]

Eliza Leslie: Directions for Cookery, in Its Various Branches. Eleventh edition. Philadelphia, 1840, page 407-408.
Eliza Leslie: Directions for Cookery, in Its Various Branches. Eleventh edition. Philadelphia, 1840, page 407-408. [34-407] [34-408]

In 1840, a cookbook defines:  “SANGAREE.- Mix in a pitcher or in tumblers one-third of wine, ale, or porter, with two-thirds od water either warm or cold. Stir in sufficient loaf-sugar to sweeten it, and grate some nutmeg into it. By adding to it lemon juice, you may make what is called negus.” [34-407] [34-408]

This cookbook errs in the definition of a Negus, and besides, lemon juice belongs in a Sangaree.

John Russell Bartlett: Dictionary of Americanisms. New York, 1848, page 282.
John Russell Bartlett: Dictionary of Americanisms. New York, 1848, page 282. [36-282]

In 1848, a dictionary defines: “SANGAREE. (Span. sangre, blood.) A drink made of red wine, water, and sugar, with nutmeg grated over it. This word, now very common throughout the United States, was introduced from the West Indies.” [36-282]

Richard Dennis Hoblyn: A dictionary of terms used in medicine and the collateral sciences. Philadelphia, 1859, page 396.
Richard Dennis Hoblyn: A dictionary of terms used in medicine and the collateral sciences. Philadelphia, 1859, page 396. [42-396]

In 1859, a medical dictionary defines: “SANGAREE. A beverage made of wine or porter, with water, sugar, and nutmeg.” [42-396]

Plain and Spiced Wine Punch without Water

There are also references that omit the addition of water. However, this is understandable. A wine already has a relatively low alcohol content. So if you don’t want the Punch to be too low in alcohol, it’s perfectly fine to forgo adding extra water without violating the definition of what a Punch is.

Basil Hall: Extracts from a journal, written on the coasts of Chili, Peru, and Mexico. Vol. II. London & Philadelphia, 1824, page 119.
Basil Hall: Extracts from a journal, written on the coasts of Chili, Peru, and Mexico. Vol. II. London & Philadelphia, 1824, page 119. [24-119]

In 1824, a dinner party at Tepic in Mexico is described: “In the middle of the table was placed a ham, flanked by two huge bowls, one of punch, the other of sangaree, a mixture of wine, sugar, lemon-juice, and spices.” [24-119]

J. H. Stocqueler: The old field officer. Vol. I. Edinburgh, 1853, page 27.
J. H. Stocqueler: The old field officer. Vol. I. Edinburgh, 1853, page 27. [37-27]
In 1853, a narrative reports on  – „a most abonimable compound of villanous Madeira, sugar and lime juice, called Sangaree“ [37-27]

 

In 1856, an English-German dictionary states: “Sangaree, Sangoree, Sangree … in the West Indies, a drink consisting of Madeira wine, sugar, lemon juice, cinnamon, cloves, nutmeg and toasted bread rind.

Newton Ivory Lucas: Englisch-deutsches und deutsch-englisches Wörterbuch. Band I. Bremen, 1856, page 1490.
Newton Ivory Lucas: Englisch-deutsches und deutsch-englisches Wörterbuch. Band I. Bremen, 1856, page 1490. [39-1490]

– “Sangaree, Sangoree, Sangree … in Westindien ein aus Madeirawein, Zucker, Citronensaft, Zimmet, Gewürznelken, Muskatnuß und gerösteter Brodrinde bestehendes Getränk.” [39-1490]

You might be surprised at the addition of the toasted bread rind, but this was a Punch ingredient that was common in the past. We went into more detail about the reasons for the addition of bread in our post describing the first one hundred years of punch.

Negus

A certain erratic confusion is also evident in the claim that a Sangaree is a Negus. We will show that Negus is simply wine diluted with water. Nevertheless, some sources claim that Sangaree and Negus are identical. So when we deal with Sangaree, we must not disregard these claims.

Robert Renny: An history of Jamaica. London, 1807, page 190.
Robert Renny: An history of Jamaica. London, 1807, page 190. [15-190]
In 1807, a travelogue is published describing how in 1799 they docked in Barbados, visited a tavern and ordered “sangaree, (wine mixed with water). [15-190] However, this is a Negus, not a Sangaree.

Anonymus: An Account of Jamaica. London, 1808, page 199.
Anonymus: An Account of Jamaica. London, 1808, page 199. [17-199]
In 1808, a report on Jamaica says: “Sangaree (Madeira wine diluted with water, and sweetened) arrack punch, and other potations are pretty freely drank, early in the day, in the taverns.“ [17-199] This is not sangaree, but a sweetened negus, i.e. a Wine Toddy.

Gustavus Hippisley: A narrative of the expedition to the rivers Orinoco and Apuré. London, 1819, page 104.
Gustavus Hippisley: A narrative of the expedition to the rivers Orinoco and Apuré. London, 1819, page 104. [22-104]

In 1819, a report on a journey in 1817 to the Orinoco and the Río Apure also mixes it up in this way. It says:  – “Yet this rain water, …, is the clearest and finest tasted beverage that can be drank: its coolness too, in that warm climate, renders it, when mixed into the all-fascinating beverage sangaree, whether with claret or Madeira, and sweetened with syrup, a drink equal to nectar, and “fitting even for the gods to quaff!”” [22-104]

The London medical gazette. Vol. XI. London, 1833, page 798.
The London medical gazette. Vol. XI. London, 1833, page 798. [30-798]

In 1833, a medical journal erred when it wrote: “Sangaree is made with wine, and is synonymous with negus.” [30-798]

William C. Carter & Adam J. Glossbrenner: History of York County. York, 1834, page 142.
William C. Carter & Adam J. Glossbrenner: History of York County. York, 1834, page 142. [31-142]

In 1834, it says of the prices in Pennsylvania taverns: “One quart sangaree made with one pint of good Madeira wine and with loaf sugar”. [31-142]

Anonymus: Tom Cringle's Log. New York, 1835, page 144.
Anonymus: Tom Cringle’s Log. New York, 1835, page 144. [33-144]

In 1835, a narrative states “and then the sangaree – old Madeira, two parts of water, no more, and nutmeg[33-144] This mixture is not called negus, but it is nothing other than a spiced negus.

Sangaree from other spirits

Beer

Sangaree was not always made with wine, beer was also used.

Anonymus: Robbery of the Bank of Pennsylvania in 1798. Philadelphia, 1808, page 22.
Anonymus: Robbery of the Bank of Pennsylvania in 1798. Philadelphia, 1808, page 22. [18-22]

In 1808, a book was published reporting on a robbery that took place in Pennsylvania in 1798. It says: they were drinking either porter or beer sangaree“. [18-22]

Eliza Leslie: Directions for Cookery, in Its Various Branches. Eleventh edition. Philadelphia, 1840, page 407-408.
Eliza Leslie: Directions for Cookery, in Its Various Branches. Eleventh edition. Philadelphia, 1840, page 407-408. [34-407] [34-408]

We had already listed the recipe of the year 1840, according to which a sangaree can also be prepared with ale or porter: “SANGAREE.- Mix in a pitcher or in tumblers one-third of wine, ale, or porter, with two-thirds od water either warm or cold. Stir in sufficient loaf-sugar to sweeten it, and grate some nutmeg into it. By adding to it lemon juice, you may make what is called negus.” [34-407] [34-408]

The encyclopaedia published in 1859 says something similar: “SANGAREE. A beverage made of wine or porter, with water, sugar, and nutmeg.” [42-396]

Distillates

Distillates were also used instead of wine, which means that the Sangaree is no longer a Sangaree, but an ordinary Punch.

Johann Georg Christian Fick: Vollständiges Englisch=Deutsches und Deutsch=Englisches Lexicon. Erlangen, 1802, page 534.
Johann Georg Christian Fick: Vollständiges Englisch=Deutsches und Deutsch=Englisches Lexicon. Erlangen, 1802, page 534. [10-534]

A German encyclopaedia of 1802 defines that Sangaree is a “Punch of Arrack” – “Punch von Arrack“. [10-534]

The London medical gazette. Vol. X. London, 1832, page 690.
The London medical gazette. Vol. X. London, 1832, page 690. [27-690]

In 1832, a medical work reported on a sangaree made with rum:  “Consulting me a second time, he stated that he was inclined to attribute his complaint to Sangaree, made with rum, which in the process of distillation passed through a leaden pipe, in the refrigeratory. One fact seemed to render this opinion doubtful. Many other persons had drank the same rum in Sangaree, yet had not suffered either from colic or paralysis.” [27-690]

Anthony Todd Thomson: Elements of materia medica and therapeutics. Vol. II. London, 1832, page 73.
Anthony Todd Thomson: Elements of materia medica and therapeutics. Vol. II. London, 1832, page 73. [28-73]

In 1833, another medical work also reported a rum version:  “A gentleman returned twice from the West Indies, suffering under palsy, the sequel of colica pictonum, or dry bellyache, as it is termed in the West Indies, produced by drinking sangaree, made of rum distilled through a leaden worm.” [28-73]

Bentley's miscellany. Vol. XV. London, 1844, page 62.
Bentley’s miscellany. Vol. XV. London, 1844, page 62. [32-62]

In 1844, one even writes “and a glass containing a draught of bombo, or sangaree, a liquor composed of water, sugar, rum, lemon-juice, and nutmeg”. [32-62]

A Bombo, also called Rumbo or Bumbo, however, is a category of its own, which we will discuss separately.

Cold or warm?

Anonymus: Memoirs of the Philadelphia Society for Promoting Agriculture. Vol. V. Philadelphia, 1826, page 242.
Anonymus: Memoirs of the Philadelphia Society for Promoting Agriculture. Vol. V. Philadelphia, 1826, page 242. [19-242]

We have found only a few references to the fact that a Sangaree is to be served warm. There are the already mentioned sources from 1833 [29-219] and 1840. [34-407] [34-408] In addition, a medical work from 1826 recommends a “warm wine sangaree“. [19-242]

One may conclude from this that Sangaree was usually prepared cold.

Namen origin

Notes and Queries. 15. November 1858, page 381-382.
Notes and Queries. 15. November 1858, page 381-382. [40-382]

Where did the Sangaree get its name from? The dictionary from 1848, which we have already quoted, gives us information on this. According to this dictionary, the name Sangaree comes from the Spanish word for blood, “sangre”. [36-282] Let us remember that in the very first mention, when it is written that the Sangaree is a punch of Mr. Gordon, it is also called Sangre. [1-551] This derivation of the name suggests that a Sangaree should be made with red wine.

However, there are other derivations. A letter to the editor in 1856 makes a rather bold claim. It is said that there is no satisfactory derivation of the word, at least none known to the writer, and he assumes that the origin of the word is the Holy Grail, called “sangreal” in English, and then goes on to speak of the legendary King Arthur with his famous Round Table and of medieval troubadours. [40-382]

Sangaree and Sangría

Why Mr. Gordon chose the Spanish name “sangre” for his Wine Punch, we do not know. One could assume that he had received the recipe from Spain, but we could not find any source to prove this. So, based on the sources, we have to assume that it was his invention and that the sangaree went around the world and eventually became the sangría in Spain and Portugal. Anyone here who may know of old Spanish sources that suggest otherwise is cordially invited to share them with us.

The EU regulation

Sangría is now a protected term and defined by the EU regulation for aromatised wine products:

“Sangría/Sangria. Aromatised wine-based drink,

  • which is obtained from wine,
  • which is aromatised with the addition of natural citrus-fruit extracts or essences, with or without the juice of  such fruit,
  • to which spices may have been added,
  • to which carbon dioxide may have been added,
  • which has not been coloured,
  • which have an actual alcoholic strength by volume of not less than 4,5 % vol., and less than 12 % vol., and
  • which may contain solid particles of citrus-fruit pulp or peel and its colour must come exclusively from the raw materials used.

‘Sangría’ or ‘Sangria’ may be used as a sales denomination only when the product is produced in Spain or Portugal. When the product is produced in other Member States, ‘Sangría’ or ‘Sangria’ may only be used to supplement the sales denomination ‘aromatised wine-based drink’, provided that it is accompanied by the words: ‘produced in …’, followed by the name of the Member State of production or of a more restricted region.” [7]

The regulation also states that sugar, for example, is permitted for sweetening aromatised wine products. [7] A Sangría thus fully corresponds to the definition of a Sangaree. They are – as the name already suggests – identical.

Intermediate view

As we can prove from the available sources, despite the numerous confusions, a Sangaree is a Wine Punch made from wine, water, sugar, lemon juice and spices, first and foremost nutmeg. Ideally, you use a red wine so that the name makes sense; originally it was a Madeira wine. The Spanish and Portuguese Sangría is also a Sangaree.

Analysis of the historical recipes

If we look at the sources we found for the Sangaree up to 1861, the following picture emerges:

Sangaree - before 1862.
Sangaree – before 1862.

We had established that a Sangaree is a Classic Plain Wine Punch or a Classic Spiced Wine Punch, preferably prepared with Madeira, optionally diluted with water. So it comes in two varieties:

  • Classic Plain Sangaree: (Madeira-)wine, optionally water, sugar, citrus
  • Classic Spiced Sangaree: (Madeira-)wine, optionally water, sugar, citrus, spice

But even in the early days, this clear definition was mostly ignored. Instead, it was mainly prepared in the following forms:

  • Classic Plain Negus: wine, optionally water
  • Classic Spiced Negus: wine, optionally water, spice
  • Classic Plain Toddy: wine, optionally water, sugar
  • Classic Spiced Toddy: wine, optionally water, sugar, spice

like a Plain Wine Toddy or a Spiced Wine Toddy (i.e. made from wine, sugar and optionally water and spice).

This confusion continues from 1862 to the present day. Since it is clearly defined what a Sangaree is, we have not considered Sangaree made with wine in our analysis from 1862 onwards. Rather, we have turned our attention to how those made with a distillate, namely rum or whiskey, were fleshed out. What were these recipes?

Sangaree - Rum- und Whiskey-Sangaree.
Sangaree – Rum- and Whiskey-Sangaree.

They show that the so-called Rum Sangaree and Whiskey Sangaree were in fact nothing more than a Toddy. Rarely was it understood to be anything other than a Punch. The following diagram shows in more detail exactly which varieties were prepared:

Sangaree - Details of Rum- and Whiskey-Sangaree.
Sangaree – Details of Rum- and Whiskey-Sangaree.

We have already had the pleasure of making the acquaintance of the Negus in this article. We had anticipated that a Negus was nothing more than wine diluted with water, but without proving this more precisely. The next post will therefore deal with the Negus.

Sources
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  13. https://archive.org/details/gri_33125011134307/page/n529/mode/2up/search/punch E. Chambers: Cyclopaedia: or, an universal dictionary of arts and sciences; containing the things signify’d thereby, in the several arts, both liberal and mechanical, and the several sciences, human and divine: The figures, kinds, properties, productions, preparations, and uses of things natural and artificial; The rise, progress, and state of things ecclesiastical, civil, military, and commercial: With the several systems, sects, opinions, &c. among philosophers, divines, mathematicians, physicians, antiquaries, criticks, &c. Volume the second. London, 1728.
  14. https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Muskatnussbaum Muskatnussbaum.
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  16. https://archive.org/details/b28772325_0003/page/172/mode/2up/search/toddy Leonhard Ludwig Finke: Versuch einer allegemeinen medicinisch-praktischen Geographie, worin der historische Theil der einheimischen Völker- und Staaten-Arzeneykunde vorgetragen wird. Dritter Band. Leipzig, 1792.
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  23. https://archive.org/details/bub_gb_os4GAAAAQAAJ/page/n187/mode/2up/search/sangaree?q=%22madeira%2C+claret%2C+punch%2C+porter%22 Samuel Morewood: An essay on the inventions and customs of both ancients and moderns in the use of inebriating liquors. London, 1824.
  24. https://archive.org/details/extractsfromajo00unkngoog/page/n131/mode/2up/search/sangaree?q=sangaree Basil Hall: Extracts from a journal, written on the coasts of Chili, Peru, and Mexico, in the years 1820, 1821, 1822. Vol. II. London & Philadelphia, 1824.
  25. https://archive.org/details/s1id13414170/page/62/mode/2up/search/sangaree?q=sangaree The mirror of literature, amusement, and instruction. Volume 4, 1824.
  26. https://archive.org/details/marlyoraplanter00unkngoog/page/n364/mode/2up/search/sangaree?q=sangaree Anonymus: Marly, Or, A Planter’s Life in Jamaica. Glasgow, 1828.
  27. https://archive.org/details/londonmedicalgaz10londuoft/page/690/mode/2up/search/sangaree?q=sangaree The London medical gazette. Vol. X. London, 1832.
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  29. https://archive.org/details/101192339.nlm.nih.gov/page/n241/mode/2up/search/sangaree?q=sangaree John C. Gunn: Gunn’s domestic medicine, or Poor man’s friend. Shewing the diseases of men, women and children, and expressly intended for the benefit of families. Containing a description of the medicinal roots and herbs, and how they are to be used in the cure of diseases. Arranged on a new and simple plan. Second edition. Knockville, 1833.
  30. https://archive.org/details/londonmedicalgaz11londuoft/page/798/mode/2up/search/sangaree?q=sangaree The London medical gazette. Vol. XI. London, 1833.
  31. https://archive.org/details/historyofyorkcou00cart/page/142/mode/2up/search/sangaree?q=sangaree William C. Carter & Adam J. Glossbrenner: History of York County, from its erection to the present time. York, 1834.
  32. https://archive.org/details/bentleysmiscell23smitgoog/page/n74/mode/2up/search/sangaree?q=sangaree Bentley’s miscellany. Vol. XV. London, 1844.
  33. https://archive.org/details/cruisemidge01scotgoog/page/n147/mode/2up/search/sangaree?q=sangaree Anonymus: Tom Cringle’s Log. New York, 1835.
  34. https://archive.org/details/directionsforco01leslgoog/page/n395/mode/2up/search/sangaree?q=sangaree Eliza Leslie: Directions for Cookery, in Its Various Branches. Eleventh edition. Philadelphia, 1840.
  35. https://archive.org/details/b21529905/page/694/mode/2up/search/sangaree?q=sangaree Thomas Webster: An encyclopædia of domestic economy: comprising such subjects as are most immediately connected with housekeeping: as, the construction of domestic edifices, with the modes of warming, ventilating, and lighting them; a description of the varous articles of furniture, with the nature of their materials; duties of servants; a general account of the animal and vegetable substances used as food, and the methods of preserving and preparing thm by cooking; making bread; the chemical nature and the preparation of all kinds of fermented liquors used as beverage; materials employed in dress and the toilette; business of the laundry; description of the various wheel-carriages; preservation of health; domestic medicine, &c. &c. London, 1844.
  36. https://archive.org/details/dictionaryofamer00bart/page/282/mode/2up/search/sangaree?q=sangaree John Russell Bartlett: Dictionary of Americanisms. A glossary of words and phrases, usually regarded as peculiar to the United States. New York, 1848.
  37. https://archive.org/details/in.ernet.dli.2015.48141/page/n33/mode/2up/search/sangaree?q=sangaree J. H. Stocqueler: The old field officer; or the military and sporting adventures of major Worthington. Vol. I. Edinburgh, 1853.
  38. https://archive.org/details/b2153102x/page/582/mode/2up/search/sangaree?q=sangaree Anonymus: Modern domestic cookery: based on the well-known work of Mrs. Rundell, but including all the recent improvements in the culinary art. Founded on principles of economy and practical knowledge, and adapted for private families. London, 1853.
  39. https://archive.org/details/p2englischdeutsc01luca/page/1490/mode/2up/search/sangaree?q=sangaree Newton Ivory Lucas: Englisch-deutsches und deutsch-englisches Wörterbuch; mit besonderer Rücksicht auf den gegenwärtigen Standpunkt der Literatur und Wissenschaft. Band I. Bremen, 1856.
  40. https://archive.org/details/notesandqueries30haylgoog/page/n392/mode/2up/search/sangaree?q=sangaree Notes and Queries. 15. November 1858.
  41. https://archive.org/details/mrshalesreceipts01hale/page/n7/mode/2up/search/sangaree?q=sangaree Sarah Josepha Hale: Mrs. Hale’s receipts for the million: containing four thousand five hundred and forty-five receipts, facts, directions, etc. in the useful, ornamental, and domestic arts, and in the conduct of life. Philadelphia, 1857.
  42. https://archive.org/details/38841356.5821.emory.edu/page/n399/mode/2up/search/sangaree?q=sangaree Richard Dennis Hoblyn: A dictionary of terms used in medicine and the collateral sciences. Philadelphia, 1859.

Historical recipes

1883 Patsy McDonough: McDonough’s Bar-Keepers’ Guide. Seite 16. Whiskey Sangaree.

Follow the same directions as in No. 36, substituting Whiskey for
Brandy.

Seite 15. No. 44. Brandy Sangaree.

Use medium sized bar glass, one-half table-spoonful of bar sugar,
moisten with one-half wine-glass of water, some shaved ice, one wine-
glass of Brandy. Stir with bar spoon and dash on some Port Wine.
Sip through a straw.

1892 James Mew & John Ashton: Drinks of The World. Seite 188. Sangaree.

The sangaree, originally a West Indian drink, is as
unsatisfactory in its explanation as in its etymology.
It seems, indeed, to be little more than spirit and
water, with sugar and nutmeg to taste. It very nearly
approaches, if it is not identical with, toddy. 1

1 Such at least is the signification of sangaree as far as American
drinks are concerned. But Sang-gris is said by Bescherelle to be a
mixture of tea in wine amongst the sailors of the North. Perhaps
the name is taken from the colour. It recalls David Garrick’s
“Why, the tea is as red as blood.” In the West Indies it is made of
Madeira, water, lime juice, and sugar. Spices are sometimes added.
Pinckard’s “West Indies,” i. 469.

1895 Chris F. Lawlor: The Mixicologist. Seite 37. Whiskey Sangaree.

(Use medium barglass.)
Same as brandy sangaree, only using rye
bourbon whiskey instead of the brandy.

Seite 37. Brandy Sangaree.

(Use medium barglass.)
Take 1/2 teaspoonful of fine white sugar dissolved
in a little water.
1 wineglass of brandy.
Fill the glass one third full of shaved ice, shake
up well, strain into a small glass and dash a little
Port wine on top. Serve with a little grated nut-
meg.

1898 Joseph L. Haywood: Mixology. Seite 43. Sangaree.

Is wine and water sweetened and spiced.

1899 Anonymus: Hegenbarth’s Getränkebuch. Seite 37. Sangaree.

in Amerika ein kurzes Getränk aus Wasser, Wein oder
Spirituosen, Zucker und Gewürz bestehend.

1899 Chris F. Lawlor: The Mixicologist. Seite 37. Whiskey Sangaree.

(Use medium barglass.)
Same as brandy sangaree, only using rye or
bourbon whiskey instead of the brandy.

Seite 37. Brandy Sangaree.

(Use medium barglass.)
Take 1/2 teaspoonful of fine white sugar dissolved
in a little water.
1 wineglass of brandy.
Fill the glass one third full of shaved ice, shake
up well, strain into a small glass and dash a little
Port wine on top. Serve with a little grated nut
meg.

1900 Frank Newman: American-Bar. Seite 59. Whisky Sangaree.

Verre n° 6.
Prendre un gobelet en argent, glace en petits morceaux:
1 cuillerée à café de sucre en poudre,
1 cuillerée à café d’eau pour faire fondre le sucre,
1 verre à liqueur de whisky.
Frapper fortement, passer, verser, saupoudrer de muscade,
servir.

1900 James C. Maloney: The 20th Century Guide for Mixing Fancy Drinks. Seite 52. Whisky Sangaree.

Is prepared the same as the Brandy Sangaree,
using whisky (Wellington Rye) instead of brandy.

Seite 13. Brandy Sangaree.

Take an old-fashioned cocktail glass.
1 teaspoonful sugar.
1/2 wine glass water.
2 small pieces of ice.
1 wine glass of brandy.
Stir well and float a little claret wine on top and
serve.

1900 William T. Boothby: Cocktail Boothby’s American Bartender. #261. Whiskey Sangaree.

Make the same as Brandy Sangaree, with whiskey substituted for brandy.
(See Recipe No. 258.)

#258. Brandy Sangaree.

Fill a large bar glass with fine ice, add a jigger of cognac and a spoonful of
sugar, shake thoroughly, strain into a small cut glass, grate nutmeg on top and
serve.

1903 Anonymus: Hegenbarth’s Bowlen-, Punsch-, und Kaffee-Haus-Getränkebuch. Seite 46. Sangree.

In Amerika ein kurzes Getränk aus Wasser, Wein
oder Spirituosen Zucker und Gewürz bestehend.

1904 Frank Newman: American-Bar. Seite 85. Rum Sangaree.

Verre no 6
Prendre un gobelet en argent, mettre un peu de glace
pilée:
1 cuillerée à café de sucre en poudre,
1 cuillerée à café d’eau pour faire fondre le su-
cre.
1 verre à liqueur de rhum.
Adapter un second gobelet, frapper fortement, passer
dans le verre no 6, saupoudrer de muscade, servir.

1904 Frank Newman: American-Bar. Seite 108. Whisky Sangarée.

Verre no 6
Prendre un gobelet en argent, mettre un peu de glace
pilée:
1 cuillerée à café de sucre en poudre.
1 cuillerée à café d’eau pour faire fondre le
sucre,
1 verre à liqueur de canadien club, whisky.
Adapter un autre gobelet, frapper fortement, passer
dans le verre no 6, saupoudrer de muscade, servir.

1906 George Spaulding: How to Mix Drinks. Seite 34. Whiskey Sangaree.

Make same as brandy sangaree,
whiskey in place of brandy.

Seite 33. Brandy Sangaree.

Use small glass.
Sugar, one teaspoon.
Water, one-half wine glass.
Brandy, one-half wine glass.
Ice, two pieces.
Stir with a spoon.

1906 Louis Muckensturm: Louis’ Mixed Drinks. Seite 96. Whiskey Sangaree.

Take one teaspoonful of sugar,
One-half a bar-glass of Bourbon whiskey, and
Two dashes of Curacao.
Shake well in a mixing-glass, and strain into a star-glass
which contains two or three lumps of ice.

1907 Frank Newman: American-Bar. Seite 85. Rum Sangaree.

Verre no 6
Prendre un gobelet en argent, mettre un peu de glace
pilée:
1 cuillerée à café de sucre en poudre,
1 cuillerée à café d’eau pour faire fondre le
sucre.
1 verre à liqueur de rhum.
Adapter un second gobelet, frapper fortement, passer
dans le verre no 6, saupoudrer de muscade, servir.

1907 Frank Newman: American-Bar. Seite 108. Whisky Sangarée.

Verre no 6
Prendre un gobelet en argent, mettre un peu de glace
pilée:
1 cuillerée à café de sucre en poudre.
1 cuillerée à café d’eau pour faire fondre le
sucre,
1 verre à liqueur de rye whisky.
Adapter un autre gobelet, frapper fortement, passer
dans le verre no 6, saupoudrer de muscade, servir.

1908 William Boothby: The World’s Drinks and How to Mix Them. Seite 84. Whiskey Sangaree.

Make the same as a Brandy Sangaree, with whiskey substituted for
brandy. (See Recipe No. 371.)

Seite 84. Brandy Sangaree.

Fill a large bar-glass with fine ice, add a jigger of cognac and a spoonful
of sugar, shake thoroughly, strain into a small cut glass, grate nutmeg on
top and serve.

1909 Carl A. Seutter: Der Mixologist. Seite 101. Whisky-Sangaree.

Fülle ein Barglas 1/2 voll mit feinem Eis, füge hinzu:
3/4 Eßlöffel Zucker,
1 Sherryglas amerikanischen Whisky.
Schüttele es tüchtig in einem Schüttelbecher, seihe das Getränk in
ein geschliffenes, kleines Weinglas, streue Muskat darauf und serviere.

1909 Jacob A. Didier: The Reminder. Seite 54. Whiskey Sangaree.

Prepared in the same manner as
the Brandy Sangaree, using whiskey
in place of brandy, and float a little
claret wine on top and serve.

Seite 54. Brandy Sangaree.

Use a mixing glass.
1 teaspoonful of sugar dis-
solved in a little water.
1 drink of brandy.
1/2 glass of fine ice.
Stir well, strain into a fancy stem
glass and float a little port wine on
top and serve.

1910 Raymond E. Sullivan: The Barkeeper’s Manual. Seite 40. Whiskey Sangaree.

Make in the same way, using Whiskey instead
of Porter.

Seite 40. Porter Sangaree.

Use tall glass.
One teaspoonful of sugar,
Fill the glass full of crushed ice,
Pour in one split of Porter.
Stir well with spoon. Sift nutmeg on top, add
fruit and straws. Serve.

1912 Anonymus: Wehman Bros.’ Bartenders’ Guide. Seite 61. Whiskey Sangaree.

(Use a small bar glass.)
Same as Brandy Sangaree, substituting whiskey for brandy.

Seite 61. Brandy Sangaree.

(Use a small bar glass.)
Two lumps of ice,
One-half wine-glass of water,
One teaspoonful of sugar,
One glass of brandy.
Stirr up well with a spoon; grate a little nutmeg on top
and serve. Strain if desired.

1912 William Boothby: The World’s Drinks and How to Mix Them. Seite 84. Whiskey Sangaree.

Make the same as a Brandy Sangaree, with whiskey substituted for
brandy. (See Recipe No. 371.)

Seite 84. Brandy Sangaree.

Fill a large bar-glass with fine ice, add a jigger of cognac and a spoonful
of sugar, shake thoroughly, strain into a small cut glass, grate nutmeg on
top and serve.

1913 Carl A. Seutter: Der Mixologist. Seite 101. Whisky-Sangaree.

Fülle ein Barglas 1/2 voll mit feinem Eis, füge hinzu:
3/4 Eßlöffel Zucker,
1 Sherryglas amerikanischen Whisky.
Schüttele es tüchtig in einem Schüttelbecher, seihe das Getränk in ein
geschliffenes, kleines Weinglas, streue Muskat darauf und serviere.

1913 Hans Schönfeld & John Leybold: Lexikon der Getränke. Seite 209. Rum-Sangeree.

Wie Brandy-Sangeree, gebrauche Rum
statt Cognac.

Seite 31. Brandy-Sangeree.

Schüttelbecher halb voll Eis, füge hinzu:
1 Teelöffel Zucker, 1 Cocktailglas Cognac, schüttle tüch-
tig, seihe in ein Sangereeglas und streue Muskatnuß
obenauf.

1913 Hans Schönfeld & John Leybold: Lexikon der Getränke. Seite 210. Rye-Whisky-Sangeree.

Wie Brandy-Sangeree, gebrauche
Rye-Whisky statt Brandy.

Seite 31. Brandy-Sangeree.

Schüttelbecher halb voll Eis, füge hinzu:
1 Teelöffel Zucker, 1 Cocktailglas Cognac, schüttle tüch-
tig, seihe in ein Sangereeglas und streue Muskatnuß
obenauf

1913 Hans Schönfeld & John Leybold: Lexikon der Getränke. Seite 218. Scotch-Whisky-Sangeree.

Wie Brandy-Sangeree, gebrauche
Scotch-Whisky statt Brandy.

Seite 31. Brandy-Sangeree.

Schüttelbecher halb voll Eis, füge hinzu:
1 Teelöffel Zucker, 1 Cocktailglas Cognac, schüttle tüch-
tig, seihe in ein Sangereeglas und streue Muskatnuß
obenauf.

1917 Jacob A. Didier: The Reminder. Seite 54. Whiskey Sangaree.

Prepared in the same manner as
the Brandy Sangaree, using whiskey
in place of brandy, and float a little
claret wine on top and serve.

Seite 54. Brandy Sangaree.

Use a mixing glass.
1 teaspoonful of sugar dis-
solved in a little water.
1 drink of brandy,
1/2 glass of fine ice.
Stir well, strain into a fancy stem
glass and fioat a little port wine on
top and serve.

1920 Carl A. Seutter: Der Mixologist. Seite 101. Whisky-Sangaree.

Fülle ein Barglas 1/2 voll mit feinem Eis, füge hinzu:
3/4 Eßlöffel Zucker,
1 Sherryglas amerikanischen Whisky.
Schüttele es tüchtig in einem Schüttelbecher, seihe das Getränk in
ein geschliffenes, kleines Weinglas, streue Muskat darauf und serviere.

1921 Adolphe Torelli: Guide du barman. Seite 94. Rum Sangarée.

Dans un verre à bordeaux,
une cuillère à café de sucre en poudre, une cuil-
lère de glace pilée, un verre a madere de rhum,
un trait de siphon, remuer, saupoudrer muscade
et servez.

1921 Adolphe Torelli: Guide du barman. Seite 118. Whisky Sangarée.

Dans un verre moyen à
pied, quelques petits morceaux de glace, une
cuillère à café de sucre en poudre, un verre à
madère de whisky, un trait de Cherry Brandy,
remuer, saupoudrer muscade eu servez.

1922 Robert Vermeire: Cocktails. Seite 83. Whisky Sangaree.

Is made like the Ale Sangaree, but Scotch
or Rye Whisky and water is used instead
of Ale. Also put 1 or 2 lumps of ice in the
glass.

Seite 83. Ale Sangaree.

Dissolve a tablespoonful of sugar in a
small wine-glass of water. Pour this into
a large tumbler, and fill up with Ale. Grate
nutmeg on top and serve.

1922 W. Slagter: Hoe maakt men american plainen fancy drinks. Seite 184. Rum Sangaree.

Behandelen als recept No. 621, neemt
in plaats van Orangeadesiroop – Citroen
siroop en in plaats van Cognac –
Jamaica Rum.

Seite 183. 621. Brandy Sangaree.

1 Pijpglaasje Orangeadesiroop
1 Portglas Cognac
1 Eetlepel fijn geschrapt ijs
Met spuitwater bijvullen.

1922 W. Slagter: Hoe maakt men american plainen fancy drinks. Seite 184. Whisky Sangaree.

Behandelen als recept No. 621, neemt
in plaats van Orangeadesiroop – Citroen
siroop en in plaats van Cognac – Cana-
dianclub Whisky.

Seite 183. 621. Brandy Sangaree.

1 Pijpglaasje Orangeadesiroop
1 Portglas Cognac
1 Eetlepel fijn geschrapt ijs
Met spuitwater bijvullen.

1923 P. Dagouret: Le barman universel. Seite 80. Sangarees.

Boisson froide, muscadée, se divisant en deux types:
Le long sangaree est à base de bière: ale, bitter,
porter, stout; le servir dans, le verre n° 3.
Le short sangaree est à base de spiritueux, de li-
queurs ou de vins liquoreux; le servir dans le verre
n° 8.

1923 P. Dagouret: Le barman universel. Seite 81. Rhum Sangaree.

Timbale au 1/4 de glace pilée:
1 cuiller à café sucre en poudre.
1 cuiller a café d’eau froide.
1/2 verre à madère de rhum.
Former le shaker. Frapper.
Passer dans le verre n° 8. Muscader. Servir.

1923 P. Dagouret: Le barman universel. Seite 81. Whisky Sangaree.

Timbale au 1/4 de glace pilée.
1 cuiller à café sucre en poudre.
1 cuiller à café d’eau froide.
1/2 verre à madère de whisky.
Former le shaker. Frapper.
Passer dans le verre n° 8. Muscader. Servir.

1924 Carlo Beltramo: Les cocktails et les boissons américaines. Seite 72. Whisky Sangarée.

Se prépare comme le sangaree precedent
en ajoutant ime mesure de whisky scotch ou
Rey suivant le goût du consommateur.

Seite 74. Ale Sangarée.

Faire fondre une cuillerée à soupe de sucre
dans un verre à vin d’eau nature, mettre cela
dans un tumbler, remplir de biere blonde bien
froide, ajouter une rapee de noix muscade et
boire mousseux.

1925 Carl A. Seutter: Der Mixologist. Illustriertes internationales Getränkebuch. Seite 101. Whisky-Sangaree.

Fülle ein Barglas 1/2 voll mit feinem Eis, füge hinzu:
3/4 Eßlöffel Zucker,
1 Sherryglas amerikanischen Whisky.
Schüttele es tüchtig in einem Schüttelbecher, seihe das Getränk in
ein geschliffenes, kleines Weinglas, streue Muskat darauf und serviere.

1926 W. Slagter: Cocktails. Seite 201. Rum Sangaree.

Behandelen als recept No. 709; neemt
inplaats van Orangeadesiroop, Citroen-
siroop en in plaats van Cognac, Jamaïca
Rum.

Seite 200. 709. Brandy Sangaree.

1 Pijpglaasje Orangeadesiroop
1 Portglas Cognac
1 Eetlepel fijn geschrapt ijs.
Met Spuitwater bijvullen.

1926 W. Slagter: Cocktails. Seite 202. Whisky Sangaree.

Behandelen als recept No. 709; neemt in-
plaats van Orangeadesiroop, Citroen-
siroop en in plaats van Cognac, Whisky.

Seite 200. 709. Brandy Sangaree.

1 Pijpglaasje Orangeadesiroop
1 Portglas Cognac
1 Eetlepel fijn geschrapt ijs.
Met Spuitwater bijvullen.

1927 Adolphe Torelli: American Drinks Dictionary. Seite 143. Rhum Sangarée.

Dans un verre à bor-
deaux, une cuillère à café de sucre, dissoudre avec
un peu d’eau de Seltz, un morceau de glace. Rem-
plir avec un verre à madère de Rhum, remuer et
saupoudrer de muscade.

1927 Adolphe Torelli: American Drinks Dictionary. Seite 181. Whisky Sangarée.

Dans un verre
moyen, une cuillère à café de sucre, dissoudre
avec un peu d’eau, un morce au de glace, un verre
à madère de Whisky, un trait de Cherry Brandy,
remuer et saupoudrer de muscade.

1927 Pedro Chicote: El bar americano en España. Seite 131. Whisky-Sangaree.

Prepárese en copa de vino:
3 pedacitos de hielo picado.
1 cucharada de las de café de azúcar en polvo.
El resto, hasta terminar la copa, de whisky.
Con una cucharilla se remueve hasta que el azú-
car quede disuelta y después se florea con un po-
quito de nuez moscada, rallada, sirviéndose en la
misma copa acompañado de unas pajas.

1928 Pedro Chicote: Cocktails. Seite 322. Whisky-Sangaree.

Prepárese en copa de vino:
3 pedacitos de hielo picado.
1 cucharada de las de café de azúcar en polvo.
El resto, hasta terminar la copa, de whisky.
Con una cucharilla se remueve hasta que el azú=
car quede disuelta y después se florea con un po=
quito de nuez moscada rallada, sirviéndose en la
misma copa arompañado de unas pajas.

1929 Adolphe Torelli: American Drinks Dictionary. Seite 143. Rhum Sangarée.

Dans un verre à bor-
deaux, une cuillère à café de sucre, dissoudre avec
un peu d’eau de Seltz, un morceau de glace. Rem-
plir avec un verre à madère de Rhum, remuer et
saupoudrer de muscade.

1929 Adolphe Torelli: American Drinks Dictionary. Seite 181. Whisky Sangarée.

Dans un verre
moyen, une cuillère à café de sucre, dissoudre
avec un peu d’eau, un morceau de glace, un verre
à madère de Whisky, un trait de Cherry Brandy,
remuer et saupoudrer de muscade.

1929 P. Dagouret: Le Barman Universel. Seite 83. Rhum Sangaree.

Timbale au 1/4 de glace pilée:
1 cuiller à café sucre en poudre.
1 cuiller à café d’eau froide.
1/2 verre à madère de rhum.
Former le shaker. Frapper.
Passer dans le verre n° 8. Muscader. Servir.

1929 P. Dagouret: Le Barman Universel. Seite 83. Whisky Sangaree.

Timbale au 1/4 de glace pilée.
1 cuiller à café sucre en poudre.
1 cuiller à café d’eau froide.
1/2 verre à madère de whisky.
Former le shaker. Frapper.
Passer dans le verre n° 8. Muscader. Servir.

1930 Knut W. Sundin: Two Hundred Selected Drinks. Seite 68. Whisky Sangaree.

Dissolve a tablespoonful of sugar in a small
wine glass of water. Pour this into a large tumb-
ler and fill up with Rye Whisky and water.

1930 Pedro Chicote: La ley mojada. Seite 342. Whisky-Sangaree.

Prepárese en copa de vino:
3 pedacitos de hielo picado.
1 cucharada de las de café de azúcar en polvo.
El resto, hasta terminar la copa, de whisky. Con
una cucharilla se remueve hasta que el azúcar que-
de disuelta y después se florea con un poquito de
nuez moscada rallada, sirviéndose en la misma copa
acompañado de unas pajás.

1930 William T. Boothby: „Cocktail Bill“ Boothby’s World Drinks. Seite 127. Rum Sanagree.

Rum . . . . . . . . . . . 1 1/2 jiggers Sugar Syrup . . . . . . . . . 2 spoons
. Nutmeg . . . . . . . . . to taste
Stir well with ice in highball glass. Fill with ice water, grate nutmeg over
and serve.

1930 William T. Boothby: „Cocktail Bill“ Boothby’s World Drinks. Seite 128. Whisky Sangaree.

Whisky . . . . . . . . . 1 1/2 jiggers Sugar Syrup . . . . . . . 2 spoons
. Nutmeg . . . . . to taste
Stir well with ice in highball glass. Fill with ice water, grate nutmeg over
and serve.

1931 Louis Leospo: Traité d’industrie hotelière. Seite 645. Sangarees.

Préparation des Short Drinks. — On met dans un shaker une
cuillerée de glace pilée, une demi-cuillerée de sucre en “poudre, puis
la liqueur demandée. On remue fortement le shaker et on verse le
contenu dans un verre à Bordeaux. On y ajoute une pointe de mus-
cade.
Préparation des Longs Drinks. — Dans un tumbler moyen, on
met d’abord le sucre et la glace pilée, puis on ajoute la bière demandée,
tout en remuant avec une cuillère. La marque de la bière donne son
nom au long drink. On ajoute une pointe de muscade.

1931 Louis Leospo: Traité d’industrie hotelière. Seite 646. Whisky-sangaree.

1/2 cuillerée à café de sucre en poudre.
1 verre 1/2 à liqueur de whisky.
Pointe de muscade.

1933 Anonymus: The Bartender’s Friend. Seite 144. Whiskey Sangaree.

Follow recipe for Brandy Sangaree, but
use rye whiskey in place of brandy.

Seite 50. Brandy Sangaree.

Brandy Into a mixing glass put 1 teaspoonful
Port Wine of powdered sugar dissolved in water
Sugar sufficient, fill up with fine ice, add 1
Ice jigger of brandy, shake, and strain into
Nutmeg small bar glass. Float a teaspoonful of
Water Port Wine, and sprinkle with nutmeg.

1933 Antonio Josa: Cocktelera Universal. Seite 71. Sangarees.

Prepárese en Cocktelera una cucharada de
hielo rayado.
1/2 cucharadita de azúcar en polvo y des-
pués el licor que indica la fórmula.
Agítese bien y sírvase en una copa de las
de vino. Floréase con nuez-moscada ra-
yada.

1933 Antonio Josa: Cocktelera Universal. Seite 72. Whisky-Sangaree.

1/2 cucharadita de azúcar en polvo.
Copita y media de Whisky.
Floréese con nuez-moscada.

1933 Fred W. Swan: When Good Fellows Get Together. Seite 60. Whiskey Sangaree.

(use small bar glass)
Prepare same as Brandy Sangaree, substi-
tuting Whiskey for Brandy.

Seite 59. Brandy Sangaree.

(use small bar glass)
2 ice cubes.
1/2 wineglass water.
1 teaspoon sugar.
1 glass Brandy.
Stir well with a spoon. Top with grated
nutmeg, and serve.

1933 George A. Lurie: Here’s How. Seite 136. Rum Sangaree.

Rum . . . . . . . . . 1 1/2 jiggers Sugar Syrup . . . . . . . . . 2 spoons
. Nutmeg . . . . . . . to taste
Stir well with ice in highball glass. Fill with ice water,
grate nutmeg over and serve.

1933 George A. Lurie: Here’s How. Seite 137. Whisky Sangaree.

Whisky . . . . . . . . 1 1/2 jiggers Sugar Syrup . . . . . . . . . 2 spoons
. Nutmeg . . . . . . . to taste
Stir well with ice in highball glass. Fill with ice water,
grate nutmeg over and serve.

1933 P. Dagouret: Le barman universel. Seite 83. Rhum Sangaree.

Timbale au 1/4 de glace pilée:
1 cuiller à café sucre en poudre.
1 cuiller à café d’eau froide.
1/2 verre à madère de rhum.
Former le shaker. Frapper.
Passer dans le verre n° 8. Muscader. Servir.

1933 P. Dagouret: Le barman universel. Seite 83. Whisky Sangaree.

Timbale au 1/4 de glace pilée.
1 cuiller à café sucre en poudre.
1 cuiller à café d’eau froide.
1/2 verre à madère de whisky.
Former le shaker. Frapper.
Passer dans le verre n° 8. Muscader. Servir.

1934 A. T. Neirath: Rund um die Bar. Seite 123. Sangaree.

von „sangria” (blutend)
abgeleitet. Ein Getränk aus
West-Indien, das den Blut-
kreislauf günstig beeinflus-
sen soll. Das westindische
Rezept lautet: Wein, Brandy
und Limesaft, gesüßt und
gewürzt.

1934 A. T. Neirath: Rund um die Bar. Seite 287. Sangarees.

über die Herleitung des Wortes Sangaree wurde bereits
im Teil I dieses Lehrbuches, im Kapitel „Fachausdrücke und
Erklärungen” (Seite 123) Aufschluß gegeben.
Das Charakteristische an den Sangarees ist die Verwen-
dung von geriebener Muskatnuß. Als Grundstoff für
Sangarees werden Ale, Porter, Brandy, Gin, Whisky, Rum,
Portwein und Sherry verwendet. Die aus Ale und Porter
hergestellten Sangarees können heiß und kalt getrunken
werden. Man beachte aber, daß bei den kalten Sangarees
kein Eis verwendet wird, deshalb müssen die verwendeten
Weine und Spirituosen unbedingt vorgekühlt sein.
Das allgemein gültige Rezept ist folgendes:
1 Teelöffelvoll – bei Ale u. Porter – 1 Eßlöffelvoll Zucker
in wenig Wasser aufgelöst, in eine breite Champagner-
schale gegeben und mit Ale, Porter, Sherry, Portwein,
Brandy (Weinbrand), Gin, Whisky oder Rum je nach
Wunsch aufgefüllt. Darüber Muskatnuß reiben.
Heiße Ale- und Porter-Sangarees werden ebenso zu
bereitet, nur werden die Biersorten bis nahe an den
Siedepunkt erhitzt. Man beachte, daß die Biere sehr
schäumen und gieße daher sehr vorsichtig in das Glas.

1934 William T. Boothby: „Cocktail Bill“ Boothby’s World Drinks. Seite 227. Rum Sangaree.

Rum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 1/2 jiggers Sugar Syrup . . . . . . . . 2 spoons
. Nutmeg . . . . . . . . . . . . to taste
Stir well with ice in highball glass. Fill with ice water, grate nutmeg over
and serve.

1934 William T. Boothby: „Cocktail Bill“ Boothby’s World Drinks. Seite 228. Whisky Sangaree.

Whisky . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 1/2 jiggers Sugar Syrup . . . . . . . . 2 spoons
. Nutmeg . . . . . . . . . . . . to taste
Stir well with ice in highball glass. Fill with ice water, grate nutmeg over
and serve.

1935 Albert Stevens Crockett: The Old Waldorf-Astoria Bar Book. Seite 148. Rum Sangaree.

Spoonful Sugar, dissolved in
small wine-glass Water
Pour into large tumbler or tall
glass
Fill up with Jamaica Rum and
Water in desired proportions
One or two lumps Ice; serve with
spoon

1935 Leo Cotton: Old Mr. Boston. Seite 138. Whiskey Sangaree.

1 Jigger Old Mr. Boston Whis- ­
key
1/2 Teaspoon Sugar
Shake well with cracked ice and
strain into 3 oz. Cocktail glass hav­-
ing enough room in which to float
a tablespoon of Port Wine.

1935 O. Blunier: The Barkeeper’s Golden Book. Seite 176. Sangarees.

The Sangaree is a relation to the Rickey, with the difference, that
not only are the usual spirits, like Gin, Brandy or Whisky used,
but also Southern Wines, English beers. Ale and Porter, sugared,
strewn with nutmeg and without ice. Sangarees mixed with Spirits
and Wines are served in small tumblers, those with beer however
in medium or even large tumblers. Beer-Sangarees are also served
hot, however they need great care while boiling. They must be
taken off the fire as soon as they reach the boiling-point. In regard
to the origin of the Sangaree various views exist. It very probably
originated in India. It is also thought that it was used in the
Southern States of the U. S. A. for the wounded and for patients.
The name is supposed to be derived from Sangari = a blood-drink.

Le Sangaree est un parent proche du Rickey, avec la seule diffé-
rence que I’on y emploie non seulement les spiritueux ordinaires,
tels que Gin, Brandy, Whisky, mais également les vins du sud et
les bières anglaises, les Ales et le Porter sucré, poudré de muscade
et sans glace. Les Sangarees mélangés avec des spiritueux et des vins
sont servis dans le petit Tumbler, ceux à base de bière dans le
Tumbler moyen ou meme grand. Les Sangarees a biere sont aussi
servis chauds, exigent une main sûre pour la cuisson et doivent être
retirés du feu au moment de I’ébullition.
Quant à I’origine des Sangarees on n’est point tombé d’accord. On
prétend qu’ils ressortent des Indes. Mais on dit aussi qu’ils ont
servi aux soins que I’on portait aux soldats blessés et malades des
Etats du Sud.

Der Sangaree steht dem Rickey sehr nahe, nur mit dem Unter-
schiede, daß nicht nur die gewohnlichen Spirituosen wie Gin,
Brandy, Whisky in Frage kommen, sondern auch Südweine und
die engl. Biere, Ale und Porter, gezuckert, mit Muskat bestreut
und ohne Eis. Mit Spirituosen und Wein vermischte Sangarees
werden im kleinen Tumbler serviert, die mit Bier jedoch im mitt-
leren oder sogar im großen Tumbler. Die Bier-Sangarees werden
auch heiß getrunken, brauchen viel Sorgfalt beim Kochen und
müssen auf Siedepunkt abgehoben werden.
Ueber die Herkunft der Sangarees ist man verschiedener Ansicht;
er soll aus Indien stammen. Auf der andern Seite soll er in den
Südstaaten der U. S. A. für Verwundete und Kranke Verwendung
gefunden haben und soll der Name (Sangaris gesprochen) von
Sangari (Blutgetränk) herrühren.

Seite 171. Rickeys.

The Rickey is the great Sour Drink of American origin. From
this drink have developed the Sangaree, the Sour and the Fizz. The
principal part of it, the lime, a small lemon-like fruit without seed,
is replaced on the Continent by lemons.
The Lime is cut in pieces, pounded in an old-fashioned glass and
added to the desired alcohol. Gin, Cognac, Rum &c. The whole is
stirred up with a wooden spoon, sprinkled with soda and served
with a lump of ice.

Le Rickey, la boisson américaine la plus originale, servant de base
au Sangaree, au Sour et au Fizz, a pour partie intégrante la lime,
un petit fruit semblable au citron, par lequel il est remplacé au
continent.
Le lime est coupé en morceaux, broyé dans un verre old fashioned
et arrosé avec I’alcool désiré: Gin, Cognac, Rhum, etc. Le tout est
remué avec une cuiller en bois, arrosé d’une giclée de soda, et servi
avec un morceau de glace.

Der Rickey ist das Ur-Sauergetränk amerikanischer Abstammung,
auf welchem der Sangaree, der Sour und der Fizz aufgebaut sind.
Dessen Hauptbestandteil, die Lime, eine kleine zitronenartige
Frucht ohne Kerne, wird auf dem Kontinent durch Zitronen er-
setzt. Die Lime wird in Stücke geschnitten, in einem old-fashioned
Glas zerrieben, der gewünschte Alkohol, Gin, Kognak, Rum etc.
beigegeben. Das Ganze wird mit einem Holzlöffel aufgerührt, mit
einem Schuss Soda gespritzt und nebst einem Stück Eis serviert.

1935 O. Blunier: The Barkeeper’s Golden Book. Seite 178. Whisky Rock Sangaree.

1 Barspoon Rock Candy Syrup
balance Rye Whisky
stir well
serve with Ice pieces
Into old fashion glass
Nutmeg

1936 Frank Meier: The Artistry of Mixing Drinks. Seite 66. Whiskey Sangaree.

as Brandy Sangaree, using li-
quor chosen. See page 86.

Brandy Sangaree.

In heated tumbler: a teaspoon
of Sugar dissolved in little boil-
ling water, one glass of Brandy;
fill with boiling water, serve
with grated Nutmeg.

1936 Frank Meier: The Artistry of Mixing Drinks. Seite 66. Whiskey Sangaree.

as above using liquor chosen.

Above = Brandy Sangaree.

In small tumbler: one-half tea-
spoon of Sugar dissolved in
little water, a piece of Ice, one
glass of Brandy; stir, grate Nut-
meg on top and serve.

1936 Raymond Porta Mingot: Gran manual de cocktails. Seite 106. Sangarees.

El Sangaree es otra de las bebidas desconocidas en
nuestro país, cuya popularidad abarca a Norte América, Es-
paña, Francia y Centro América.
De preparación fácil, como se advertirá en sus fórmu-
las, se singulariza por llevar en todas sus formas, como ele-
mentos esenciales, alladuras de nuez moscada.
Los más comunes se hacen a base de Cognac, Gin, Ron
y Whisky.

1937 R. de Fleury: 1800 – And All That. Seite 311. Jamaica Rum Sangaree.

Dissolve a teaspoonful
of Sugar in a wineglass
of Water and pour into
a tumbler. Fill up
with equal quantities
of Jamaica Rum and
Water. Put a few
lumps of Ice into the
glass and serve with
grated Nutmeg on top.

1937 R. de Fleury: 1800 – And All That. Seite 313. Whisky Sangaree.

This is made like the
Ale Sangaree, but
Scotch or Rye Whisky
is used instead of Ale.
Also put 1 or 2 lumps
of Ice in the glass.

Seite 311. Ale Sangaree.

Put a teaspoonful of
sifted Sugar into a large
tumbler with a table-
spoonful of Water to
dissolve it. Add a
small lump of Ice and
fill up with a mixture
of Bitter and Burton
Ales. Dust with Nut­-
meg.

1938 Bud Caroll: Popular Drinks of Today. Seite 40. Whisky Sangaree.

Whisky . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 jigger Sugar . . . . . . . . . . . 2 spoons
. Nutmeg . . . . . . . . . . to taste
Stir well with ice in highball glass. Fill with ice
water, grate Nutmeg over and serve.

1938 Jean Lupoiu: Cocktails. Seite 41. Brandy Sangaree / Whisky Sangaree.

Dans un petit gobelet:
1 morceau déglace, 1/2 cuillerée de sucre
en poudre, 1 verre de Cognac Hine.
Mélanger et passer la râpe à muscade,
puis servir.
On prépare de la même façon le Gin,
Porto, Rhum ou Whisky Sangaree, en se
servant du liquide demandé.
On peut également les servir chauds à
volonté.

1938 Robert Vermeire: L’art du cocktail. Seite 90. Sangarees.

Les « Sangarees » se font d’habitude à la
bière ou au vin, mais parfois aussi au gin,
au whisky, au brandy, au rhum, etc.
Préparés à base de bière, ces drinks doivent
être servis avec beaucoup de soin, car ce
sont surtout les bières anglaises qu’on
emploie et quand celles-ci sont trop nouvel-
lement brassées, elles donnent beaucoup de
mousse et sont difficiles à servir. La bière
doit avoir une température normale ni trop
chaude, ni trop froide et pour le
Ale Sangaree

1938 Robert Vermeire: L’art du cocktail. Seite 90. Scotch Sangaree.

Scotch Sangaree
et tous autres sangarees, préparer comme
l’ale sangaree en substituant respectivement
à la base « ale », brandy, Champagne, rye,
scotch, etc.

Seite 90. Ale Sangaree.

on dissout une cuillerée à potage de sucre
dans un verre à vin d’eau fraîche. On
transfère ce liquide dans un grand tumbler
auquel on ajoute de la bière « ale », soit
« bitter ale », soit « ale on draught », soit
« bottled ale » selon les circonstances. On
mélange le tout légèrement à la cuiller et on
râpe un peu de noix muscade dessus.

1940 Charles: The Cocktail Book. Seite 119. Sangarees.

Sugar instead of sugar syrup is used in the preparation
of sangarees. The sugar is first dissolved in water and
then the solution is poured into a tumbler, in which the
sangaree itself is prepared and served.

1940 Charles: The Cocktail Book. Seite 120. Whisky Sangaree.

Prepare as for Sherry Sangaree, using Scotch whisky
instead of sherry, and adding water to taste.

Seite 119. Sherry Sangaree.

1 teaspoonful of sugar,
1/2 gill of water,
3/4 gill of sherry.
Add the sherry and half fill the glass with ice. Stir
well, decorate with grated nutmeg, and serve.

1940 Pedro Talavera: Los secretos del cocktail. Seite 183. Ron Sangaré.

En la cocktelera, unos pedacitos de hielo.
1 cucharadita de azúcar.
1 copa de Ron Saint-James.
Agítese bien y se pasa a la copa núm. 6 con un poco
de nuez moscada.

1940 Pedro Talavera: Los secretos del cocktail. Seite 220. Whisky Sangaré.

En la cocktelera, unos pedacitos de hielo.
1 cucharadita de miel.
6 gotas de Curaçaó La Campana.
1 copa de Whisky Anitiquary.
Agítese bien y se pasa a la copa núm. 6, con un
poco de nuez moscada.

1943 Jacinto Sanfeliu Brucart: Cien Cocktails. Seite 100. Whisky-Sangaree.

Póngase en la cocktelera unos pedacitos
de hielo y añadir:
1 cucharadita de Azúcar
I copita de Whisky
Agítese bien y sírvase en copa de vino, ra-
llando nuez moscada.

1943 Jacinto Sanfeliu Brucart: Cien Cocktails. Seite 100. Gin, Coñac, Ron-Sangaree.

Se preparan con la msima fórmula que el
anterior, sustituyendo el Whisky por el licor
preferido.

1945 R. M. Barrows & Betty Stone: 300 Ways to Mix Drinks. Seite 41. Rum Sangaree.

1 Teaspoon Sugar, dissolved
in seltzer
3 Oz. Jamaica Rum
5 Oz. Seltzer
2 Cubes of Ice
Grate nutmeg on top.

1947 A. Vermeys: Cocktails. Seite 77. Rhum Sangaree.

(Voir Brandy Sangarée)

Seite 24. Brandy Sangaree.

(dans un petit gobelet)
1 morceau de glace: 1/2 cuillerée de sucre:
1 verre de Cognac. Mélanger et passer râpe
à muscade.
On prépare de la même façon le Gin,
Porto, Rhum ou Whisky Sangarée, etc.
On peut également les servir chauds à vo-
lonté.

1947 A. Vermeys: Cocktails. Seite 91. Whisky Sangaree.

(Voir Brandy Sangarée)

Seite 24. Brandy Sangaree.

(dans un petit gobelet)
1 morceau de glace: 1/2 cuillerée de sucre:
1 verre de Cognac. Mélanger et passer râpe
à muscade.
On prépare de la même façon le Gin,
Porto, Rhum ou Whisky Sangarée, etc.
On peut également les servir chauds à vo-
lonté.

1947 Karl Büskens: Mixbuch für Jedermann. Seite 89. Sangarees.

Brandy.

Im kleinen Tumbler: In small tumbler:
1/2 Teelöffel Zucker in etwas 1/2 teaspoon of sugar dissolv-
Wasser auflösen ed in litle water
1 Stück Eis 1 piece of ice
1 Glas Brandy 1 glass of Brandy
gut rühren, Muskatnuß über stir well, grate nutmeg on
der Oberfläche zerreiben top

Gin, Port, Rum, Sherry oder Gin, Port, Rum, Sherry or
jeder Whisky Sangaree ge­- either Whisky Sangaree as
nau so wie oben, aber mit above except use liquor
der jeweils erwählten Flüs­- chosen
sigkeit

1947 Pedro Chicote: Cocktails mundiales. Seite 313. Whisky-Sangaree.

Prepárese en copa de vino:
3 pedacitos de hielo picado.
Una cucharada de las de café de azúcar en polvo.
El resto, hasta terminar la copa, de whisky. Con
una cucharilla se remueve hasta que el azúcar quede
disuelta, y después se florea con un poquito de nuez
moscada rallada, sirviéndose en la misma copa acom-
pañado de unas pajas.

1948 Adolphe Torelli: 900 Recettes de Cocktails et Boissons Américaines. Seite 143. Rhum Sangarée.

Dans un verre à bor-
deaux, une cuillère à café de sucre, dissoudre avec
un peu d’eau de Seltz, un morceau de glace. Rem-
plir avec un verre à madère de Rhum, remuer et
saupoudrer de muscade.

1948 Adolphe Torelli: 900 Recettes de Cocktails et Boissons Américaines. Seite 181. Whisky Sangarée.

Dans un verre
moyen, une cuillère à café de sucre, dissoudre
avec un peu d’eau, un morceau de glace, un verre
à madère de Whisky, un trait de Cherry Brandy,
remuer et saupoudrer de muscade.

1948 David A. Embury: The Fine Art of Mixing Drinks. Seite 297. Sangarees.

A Sangaree is a chilled and sweetened beer, wine, or
liquor, served in a Highball glass, and dusted over the
top with grated nutmeg. Many present-day recipe
books overlook the Sangarees made of beer, ale, and
porter and, on the other hand, in recent years the
category has been broadened to take in drinks made
with spirituous liquors diluted with water. These, of
course, are substantially the same as cold Toddies and
Slings.

1948 David A. Embury: The Fine Art of Mixing Drinks. Seite 298. Rum Sangaree. Whisky Sangaree.

Made exactly the same as those with a base
of sherry or other fortified wine.

Seite 298. Sherry Sangaree.

Made the same as the other wine San-
garees except that only about 3 ounces of the fortified
wine is used and the glass is then filled up with ice
water.

Seite 298. “Wine Sangaree”.

Made the same as the Beer
Sangarees except that one or two lumps of ice are
placed in the glass to chill the wine. It is discretionary
whether to leave the ice in the glass or to remove it
before serving the drink.

Seite 297. Beer Sangaree.

Place 2 teaspoonfuls of sugar syrup in an 8-
ounce Highball glass; fill glass with the ale, beer, or
porter; stir gently with a bar snoon; dust top with
grated nutmeg and serve.

1948 David A. Embury: The Fine Art of Mixing Drinks. Seite 298. Hot Sangarees.

The Sangarees are also sometimes served hot. In the
case of the Ale, Beer, and Porter Sangarees, this is
accomplished by heating a poker or other iron rod to
white heat and then immersing it in the drink. The
nutmeg is not added until the drink has been heated.
The Sangarees made of spirituous liquors and fortified
wines are heated by using hot instead of cold water.
The Sangarees made of light wines are not served hot,
although they could be so served by heating the wine
itself either separately or by the hot-poker method.

1948 Jean Lupoiu: Cocktails. Brandy Sangaree / Whiskey Sangaree.

Dans un petit gobelet:
1 morceau de glace, 1/2 cuillerée de
sucre en poudre, 1 verre de Cognac
CAMUS.
Mélanger et passer la râpe à muscade,
puis servir.
On prépare de la même façon le Gin,
Porto, Rhum ou Whisky Sangaree, en se
servant du liquide demandé.
On peut également les servir chauds à
volonté.

1948 P. Dagouret – Le Barman Universel 10. Seite 85. Rhum Sangaree.

Timbale au 1/4 de glace pilée:
1 cuiller à café sucre en poudre.
1 cuiller à café d’eau froide.
1/2 verre à madère de rhum.
Former le shaker. Frapper.
Passer dans le verre n° 8. Muscader. Servir.

1948 P. Dagouret – Le Barman Universel 10. Seite 85. Whisky Sangaree.

Timbale au 1/4 de glace pilée.
1 cuiller à café sucre en poudre.
1 cuiller à café d’eau froide.
1/2 verre à madère de whisky.
Former le shaker. Frapper.
Passer dans le verre n° 8. Muscader. Servir.

1948 P. Dagouret – Le Barman Universel 11. Seite 84. Sangarees.

Boisson froide, muscadée, se divisant en deux types:
Le long sangaree est à base de bière: ale, bitter,
porter, stout; le servir dans le verre n° 3.
Le short sangaree est à base de spiritueux, de li-
queurs ou de vins liquoreux; le servir dans le verre
n° 8.

1948 P. Dagouret – Le Barman Universel 11. Seite 85. Rhum Sangaree.

Timbale au 1/4 de glace pilée:
1 cuiller à café sucre en poudre.
1 cuiller à café d’eau froide.
1/2 verre à madère de rhum.
Former le shaker. Frapper.
Passer dans le verre n° 8. Muscader. Servir.

1948 P. Dagouret – Le Barman Universel 11. Seite 85. Whisky Sangaree.

Timbale au 1/4 de glace pilée.
1 cuiller a café sucre en poudre.
1 cuiller à café d’eau froide.
1/2 verre à madère de whisky.
Former le shaker. Frapper.
Passer dans le verre n° 8. Muscader. Servir.

1948 Trader Vic: Bartender’s Guide. Seite 319. Hot Sangarees.

Dissolve 1 tsp. sugar in a little boiling water in a preheated
tumbler; add 2 oz. brandy; fill with boiling water and dust
with nutmeg. Note: Gin, port, rum, sherry, or bourbon may
be substituted for the brandy.

1949 Harry Schraemli: Das grosse Lehrbuch der Bar. Seite 279. Die Sangarees.

Diese Getränke waren ursprünglich eine indische Spe­-
zialität und werden auch heute noch fast ausschliesslich in
den Tropen genossen. Man unterscheidet zwischen kalten
und warmen Sangarees. Unser kontinentaler Geschmack
kann diesen Drinks beim besten Willen nichts abgewinnen
und es wäre daher falsch sie empfehlen zu wollen.
Man serviert die heissen Sangarees entweder in Punsch­-
oder Groggläsern, die kalten in Bowlekännchen.
Die Zubereitung kann mit den üblichen Spirituosen
aber auch mit Ale, Bier usw. erfolgen. Genaue Anweisung
hierüber findet der Leser jeweilen bei dem betreffenden
Stichwort im Rezeptteil.

1949 Harry Schraemli: Das grosse Lehrbuch der Bar. Seite 430. Rum-Sangaree.

Wird gleich zubereitet wie «Brandy-Sangaree».

Seite 315. Brandy-Sangaree.

Fülle den Shaker halbvoll mit feingeschlagenem Roh­-
eis, gebe dann 1 Esslöffel Zucker und 2 Glas Cognac
hinzu, schüttle sehr gut und seihe in ein Sangareeglas.
(Kleineres Punschglas oder Tumbler.) Auf das fertige
Getränk reibt man eine Idee Muskatnuss. Man serviere
mit Saughalm.

1949 Harry Schraemli: Das grosse Lehrbuch der Bar. Seite 433. Sangaree.

Dies ist ein nicht gerade populärer «long-drink», der
in Punschgläsern serviert wird. Sangarees kann man
kalt und warm servieren. Sie bestehen gewöhnlich aus
Spirituosen, etwas Zucker und ein wenig Muskatnuss.
(Siehe Grundrezepte.)

1949 Harry Schraemli: Das grosse Lehrbuch der Bar. Seite 465. Whisky-Sangaree.

Man fülle den Shaker halbvoll mit feingeschlagenem
Roheis und füge 2 Barlöffel Zucker und 2 Glas Whisky
hinzu. Sehr gut und lang schütteln und in ein San-
gareeglas seihen. Man reibe eine Idee Muskatnuss auf
das fertige Getränk.

1949 P. Dagouret: Le Barman Universel. Seite 84. Sangarees.

Boisson Iroide, muscadée, se divisant en deux types:
Le long sangaree est à base de bière: ale, bitter,
porter, stout; le servir dans le verre n° 3.
Le short sangaree est à base de spiritueux, de li-
queurs ou de vins liquoreux; le servir dans le verre
n° 8.

1949 P. Dagouret: Le Barman Universel. Seite 85. Rhum Sangaree.

Timbale au 1/4 de glace pllée:
1 cuiller à café sucre en poudre.
1 cuiller à café d’eau froide.
1/2 verre à madère de rhum.
Former le shaker. Frapper.
Passer dans le verre n° 8. Muscader. Servir

1949 P. Dagouret: Le Barman Universel. Seite 85. Whisky Sangaree.

Timbale au 1/4 de glace pilée.
1 cuiller à café sucre en poudre.
1 cuiller à café d’eau froide.
1/2 verre à madère de whisky.
Former le shaker. Frapper.
Passer dans le verre n° 8. Muscader. Servir.

1949 Wilhelm Stürmer: Cocktails by William. Seite 85. Sangarees.

“Let’s have a Sangaree, darling,” bat die kleine Jeanette aus Kairo, wenn
wir durch die sonnenheihen Strafzen der ägyptischen Hauptstadt bummelten.
“Sangaree!” rief der junge Leutnant, wenn wir mit eingezogenem Kopf
durch eine niedrige, weiß gestrichene Tür in die erfrischende Kühle einer
dämmerigen Kellerbar traten.
“A Sangaree, Mixer”, murmelten abends die Gäste in das Surren der Ven­-
tilatoren in einem der unglaublich komfortablen Hotels in Luxor. Der Mixer
ergriff zum xten-Male Wein und Wasser, Brandy und Cognacflasche,
mischte, süßte, würzte und und bot höflich lächelnd die Gläser dar. “Your
Sangaree, Sir; your Sangaree, Mademoiselle.”
Wäre den Pharaonen vor viertausend Jahren dieser Göttertrank schon be- ­
kannt gewesen, dann hätte man beim Öffnen ihrer Grabkammern in den
Pyramiden bestimmt einen Topf voll Sangaree gefunden.

1951 Ted Saucier: Ted Saucier’s Bottoms Up. Seite 16. Sangaree.

A drink made of wine and sugar served in a small bar glass
with ice and topped with grated nutmeg; or red wine and.
water, spiced and sugared.

Anmerkung: Gleichwohl kennt Ted Saucier auch andere Sangarees, beispielsweise Brandy Sangaree oder Gin Sangaree.

1952 Anonymus: Cocktails. Seite 116. Gin, Port, Rum, Sherry ou Whisky Sangaree.

Comme le Brandy Sangaree, en rempla-
çant le cognac par du gin, du Porto, du
rhum, du sherry ou du whisky.

Seite 116. Brandy Sangaree.

Dans un tumbler chauffé:
Une cuiller à café de sucre.
Dissoudre dans un peu d’eau bouillante et
ajouter un verre de cognac.
Remplir avec de l’eau bouillante et servir
avec de la noix de muscade râpée.

1952 Charles: The Cocktail Bar. Seite 119. Sangarees.

Sugar instead of sugar syrup is used in the preparation
of sangarees. The sugar is first dissolved in water and
then the solution is poured into a tumbler, in which the
sangaree itself is prepared and served.

1952 Charles: The Cocktail Bar. Seite 120. Whisky Sangaree.

Prepare as for Sherry Sangaree, using Scotch whisky
instead of sherry, and adding water to taste.
Similar sangarees may be prepared with brandy, dry
gin, and rum.

Seite 119. Sherry Sangaree.

1 teaspoonful of sugar,
1/2 gill of water,
3/4 gill of sherry.
Add the sherry and half fill the glass with ice. Stir
well, decorate with grated nutmeg, and serve.

1953 Anonymus: The U.K.B.G. Guide to Drinks. Seite 142. Whisky Sangaree.

Same as for Brandy Sangaree
but use Whisky instead of
Brandy.

Seite 142. Brandy Sangaree.

1 teaspoonful of Fine Sugar.
2 oz. Water.
2 oz. Brandy.
Fill glass with Crushed Ice.
Stir and Grate Nutmeg on top.

1953 Leo Cotton: Old Mr. Boston Official Bartender’s Guide. Seite 152. Whiskey Sangaree.

1 1/2 oz. Old Mr. Boston Rye or
Bourbon Whiskey
1 Teaspoon Powdered Sugar
Shake well with cracked Ice and strain
into 3 oz. Cocktail glass, leaving
enough room in which to float a table­
spoon of Port Wine.

1953 Marcel et Roger Louc: Cocktails et Grand Crus. Seite 35. Sangarees.

Long drinks, qui pouvant aussi se servir en short drinks, sont
caractérisés par la présence du sucre et de la noix muscade dans les
spiritueux choisis, vins ou bières désirés. Dans certains cas peuvent
se servir chauds. Les long drinks sont à base de bière, les short
drinks à base de spiritueux ou vin. Ils se préparent au shaker ou
directement dans un verre à cocktail rempli de glace pilée ou petits
morceaux.

1953 S. S. Field: The American Drinking Book. Seite 225. Rum Sangaree.

1 teaspoon of brown sugar, slice of lemon, cracked
ice and 2 ounces of Rum. Proceed as above.

1954 Eddie Clark: King Cocktail. Seite 18. Sangaree.

Similar drink to a Cobbler.

Seite 17: Cobbler.

A summer drink made of iced wines or spirits, with
fruit juices and liqueurs, served in a fairly large wine goblet
glass, containing crushed ice and decorated with fresh fruit.

1955 Anonymus: The U.K.B.G. Guide to Drinks. Seite 142. Sangarees.

A possible relative of the Rickey. In this case, however,
the drink can be made not only with the usual spirits, but
also with wines and other bases. Various views exist as
to its origin; it is very likely that it originated in India,
but other stories say it was used in the Southern States of
the U.S.A. in war-time for the wounded and invalids.
The name is supposed to be derived from Singari, meaning
“blood drink”.
Use small tumbler. Serve with straws

1955 Anonymus: The U.K.B.G. Guide to Drinks. Seite 142. Whisky Sangaree.

Same as for Brandy Sangaree
but use Whisky instead of
Brandy.

Seite 142. Brandy Sangaree.

1 teaspoonful of Fine Sugar.
2 oz. Water.
2 oz. Brandy.
Fill glass with Crushed Ice.
Stir and Grate Nutmeg on top.

1955 Jean Lupoiu: Cocktails. Seite 35. Brand Sangaree / Whisky Sangaree.

Dans un petit gobelet:
1 morceau de glace, 1/2 cuillerée de
sucre en poudre, 1 verre de Cognac
Renault.
Mélanger et passer la râpe à muscade,
puis servir.
On prépare de la même façon le Gin,
Porto, Rhum ou Whisky Sangaree, en se
servant du liquide demandé.
On peut également les servir chauds à
volonté.

1956 Patrick Gavin Duffy: The Official Mixer’s Manual. Seite 141. Sangarees.

A Sangaree is always served in a
tumbler which may be either
small or large, depending on the
ingredients used. Regardless of
size, it will always have a grating

1960 Anonymus: The U.K.B.G. Guide to Drinks. Seite 127. Sangarees.

A possible relative of the Rickey. In this case, however,
the drink can be made not only with the usual spirits, but
also with wines and other bases. Various views exist as
to its origin; it is very likely that it originated in India,
but other stories say it was used in the Southern States of
the U.S.A. in war-time for the wounded and invalids.
The name is supposed to be derived from Singari, meaning
“blood drink”.

1960 Anonymus: The U.K.B.G. Guide to Drinks. Seite 127. Whisky Sangaree.

Same as for Brandy Sangaree
but use Whisky instead of
Brandy.

Seite 127. Brandy Sangaree.

1 teaspoonful of Fine Sugar.
2 oz. Water.
2 oz. Brandy.
Fill glass with Crushed Ice.
Stir and Grate Nutmeg on top.

1961 Pedro Chicote: El bar en el mundo. Seite 249. Whisky sangaree.

Prepárese en copa de vino:
3 pedacitos de hielo picado.
Una cucharada de las de café
de azúcar en polvo.
El resto, hasta terminar la
copa, de whisky. Con una
cucharilla se remueve has-
ta que el azúcar quede di-
suelta, y después se florea
con un poquito de nuez
moscada rallada, sirvién-
dose en la misma copa
acompañado de pajas.

1963 Luigi Veronelli: I cocktails. Seite 27. Whisky Sangaree.

1 bicchiere e 1/2 di scotch whisky
1 cucchiaio di sciroppo di zucchero (in mancanza,
1 cucchiaino di zucchero)
un pizzico di noce moscata grattugiata
ghiaccio a cubetti
Introdurre qualche cubetto di ghiaccio nel mixer. Versare
lo scotch e lo sciroppo di zucchero e mescolarli con l’ap-
posito cucchiaio; aggiungere la noce moscata. Mescolare
piuttosto forte, lasciar riposare uno o due secondi, ri-
prendere infine a mescolare ma lentamente. Servire subito.

1963 Luigi Veronelli: I cocktails. Seite 271. Whisky Sangaree.

1 bicchiere e 1/2 di scotch WHISKY
1 cucchiaio di sciroppo di zucchero (in mancanza,
1 cucchiaino di zucchero)
un pizzico di noce moscata grattugiata
ghiaccio a cubetti
Introdurre qualche cubetto di ghiaccio nel mixer. Versare
lo scotch e lo sciroppo di zucchero e mescolarli usando
l’apposito cucchiaio; aggiungere la noce moscata. Mesco­-
lare piuttosto forte, lasciar riposare un secondo, ripren­-
dere infine ad agitare ma lentamente. Servire subito.

1964 Anonymus: Manual del bar. Seite 309. Sangarees.

Es esta bebida poco conocida en nuestro medio y en
consecuencia ele muy escaso consumo.
Se prepara en el mismo vaso en que se sirve y su par-
ticulariclad consjste en adicionarle nuez moscada rallada.

1965 Aladar von Wesendonk: 888 Cocktails. Seite 129. Sangarees.

Sangarees
sind die indische Version von Smashes und entsprechend stärker
gewürzt. Ersetzt man das Cobblereis durch kochendes Wasser, ent=
steht ein Hot Sangaree, den man im Punschglas serviert.

1965 Aladar von Wesendonk: 888 Cocktails. Seite 130. Whiskey Sangaree.

Den shaker halbvoll mit Eis fül=
len
1 TL Honig
1 TL Cherry Brandy
1 Cocktailmaß Whiskey Bourbon
gut schütteln, in einen tumbler
abseihen und mit Muskatnuß
überstreuen

1965 Anonymus: The U.K.B.G. Guide to Drinks. Seite 130. Sangarees.

A possible relative of the Rickey. In this case, however,
the drink can be made not only with the usual spirits, but
also with wines and other bases. Various views exist as
to its origin; it is very likely that it originated in India,
but other stories say it was used in the Southern States of
the U.S.A. in war-time for the wounded and invalids.
The name is supposed to be derived from Singari, meaning
“blood drink.”

Use small tumbler. Serve with straws.

1965 Anonymus: The U.K.B.G. Guide to Drinks. Seite 130. Whisky Sangaree.

Same as for Brandy Sangaree
but use Whisky instead of
Brandy.

Seite 130. Brandy Sangaree.

1 teaspoonful of Fine Sugar.
2 ozs. Water.
2 ozs. Brandy.
Fill glass with Crushed Ice.
Stir and Grate Nutmeg on top.

1965 Harry Schraemli: Manuel du bar. Seite 332. Les sangarees.

A l’origine ces boissons étaient une spécialité indienne et elles sont consommées,
aujourd’hui encore, presque exclusivement dans les tropiques. On fait une distinc-
tion entre sangarees froids et chauds. Notre goût continental, avec la meilleure
volonté, ne trouve à ces drinks rien de particulier et il sera donc faux de vouloir
les recommander. On sert les sangarees chauds soit dans des verres à punch ou à
grog, les froids dans des petites cruches à bol.
La préparation peut s’effectuer avec les spiritueux usuels, mais aussi avec de l’aie,
de la bière, etc. Le lecteur trouvera une instruction précise à ce sujet sous la rubrique
correspondante dans la partie des recettes.

1965 Robert London & Anne London: Cocktails and snacks. Seite 90. Sangarees.

Sangarees are tall drinks made with port, sherry, or sauterne wine.
Combine 3 or 4 ounces of desired wine in a tall glass. Add 1 teaspoon
fine grain sugar or bar syrup, lots of cracked ice, and a slice of lemon.
Fill glass with water. Stir and sprinkle a little grated nutmeg on top
before serving.

1966 Harry Schraemli: Le roi du bar. Seite 15. Sangarees.

Une catégorie de boissons que nous n’ai-
mons pas. Elles peuvent être servies aussi
bien froides que chaudes. Les recettes en
sont les suivantes: a) froid: Remplir le
shaker à moitié avec de la glace-cobbler,
1 cuillère à soupe de sucre, 2 verres-
mesures de cognac. Agiter comme il faut
et passer dans un verre à punch. Râper
un soupçon de noix de muscade dessus,
b) chaud: Amener les mêmes quantités
que ci-dessus dans une casserole au point
d’ébullition.

1966 Mario Kardahi: Tratado Práctico de Coctelería, Pastelería y Afines. Seite 48. Sangaree.

“Trago Largo” (Long Drink). Sus
componentes son: vino, limón (en rodajas), azúcar, fru-
tas y nuez moscada. Se sirve en vaso para Collins.

1966 Mario Kardahi: Tratado Práctico de Coctelería, Pastelería y Afines. Seite 207. Sangaree.

Bebida preparada y servida en el mismo vaso a la
que se adiciona nuez moscada rallada.
Por ser poco conocida en nuestro medio, solo damos
tres recetas como ejemplo y a título de curiosidad.

1969 Mario Kardahi & Raul Echenique: El arte de la exquisitez y del buen beber. Seite 399. Sangarees.

Bebida que se prepara y se sirve en el mismo vaso, con unos
pedacitos de hielo, agregándole Nuez Moscada rallada. Por ser poco
conocida en nuestro medio, y en consecuencia de escaso consumo,
solo se dan tres recetas, como ejemplo.

1972 Leo Cotton: Old Mr. Boston. Seite 108. Whiskey Sangaree.

Dissolve 1/2 teaspoon powdered sugar
in 1 teaspoon of water. Add:
2 oz. Old Mr. Boston Whiskey*
2 cubes of Ice.
Serve in 8 oz. highball glass. Fill
balance with soda water. Stir. leav-
ing enough room on which to float a
tablespoon of Port Wine. Sprinkle
lightly with nutmeg.

* Bourbon, Blended, Rye or Canadian.

1973 Anonymus: 500 Ways to Mix Drinks. Seite 54. Rum Sangaree.

1 teaspoon powdered sugar
dissolved in charged water
2 jiggers Jamaica rum
3 cubes of ice
Fill glass with charged water.
Grate nutmeg on top.

1976 Anonymus: International Guide to Drinks. Seite 92. Sangarees.

A possible relative of the Rickey.
In this case, however, the drink
can be made not only with the
usual spirits, but also with wines
and other bases. Various views
exist as to its origin; it is very
likely that it originated in India,
but other stories say it was used
in the Southern States of the
USA in war-time for the
wounded and invalids. The name
is supposed to be derived from
‘Singari’, meaning ‘blood drink’.
Use old-fashioned glass. Serve
with straws.

1976 Anonymus: International Guide to Drinks. Seite 92. Whisky Sangaree.

Same as for brandy Sangaree
but use whisky instead.

Seite 92. Brandy Sangaree.

1 teaspoonful sugar
Equal parts of water and brandy
Fill glass with crushed ice
Stir and grate nutmeg on top

1977 Stan Jones: Jones’ Complete Barguide. Seite 308. Hot Sangarees.

Old Fashioned Glass Build
1 tsp sugar
hot water
add 2 oz brandy
Fill with hot water
Sprinkle nutmeg
(Use almost any liquor, port,
sherry, gin, whiskey)

1977 Stan Jones: Jones’ Complete Barguide. Seite 392. Sangaree.

Double Old Fashioned Build
Glass
1/4 tsp sugar dissolved with
water
Fill with ice
2 oz liquor of choice
Float 1/2 oz port on top
Nutmeg sprinkle

1977 Stan Jones: Jones’ Complete Barguide. Seite 395. Scotch Sangaree.

Double Old Fashioned Build
Glass
1/2 tsp honey dissolved with
soda
Fill with ice
Nutmeg, Lemon twist

1977 Stan Jones: Jones’ Complete Barguide. Seite 431. Whiskey Sangaree.

Old Fashioned Glass Build
1/2 tsp sugar dissolved in water
2 oz whiskey
Several ice cubes
Fill with soda
Float 1/2 oz port
Nutmeg

1980 Anonymus: Manual del bar. Seite 170. Sangarees.

Típica bebida de los países tropicales, que se pre-
para disolviendo 1 cucharadita de azúcar en agua y
agregando la bebida deseada (coñac, whisky, gin, o
jerez, oporto, cte. ) en un vaso tipo highball con hielo,
se termina de llenar con agua y sobre Ja superficie
flotando una cucharadita de vino aporto con ralladura
de nuez moscada.

explicit capitulum
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About

Hi, I'm Armin and in my spare time I want to promote bar culture as a blogger, freelance journalist and Bildungstrinker (you want to know what the latter is? Then check out "About us"). My focus is on researching the history of mixed drinks. If I have ever left out a source you know of, and you think it should be considered, I look forward to hearing about it from you to learn something new. English is not my first language, but I hope that the translated texts are easy to understand. If there is any incomprehensibility, please let me know so that I can improve it.

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