Drinks

Mojito

Mojito.

There are many stories about the Mojito, about how to prepare it correctly and about who actually invented it. But what is legend, what could be true? Does it really come from Cuba or was it perhaps invented in Brooklyn before?

40 ml Eminente 3 rum
15 ml lime juice
10 ml sugar syrup (2:1)
130 ml Thomas Henry soda water

Preparation: Prepared in a Collins glass. Stir the mint three times. First without soda, then with some soda, then some more soda and finally top up with soda.

Before we can give an answer to these questions, we should first look at the numerous myths of origin.

The origin myths

The Mojito of Sir Francis Drake

Sir Francis Drake, around 1580.
Sir Francis Drake, around 1580. [13]

Fernando Campoamor is the first to report that the predecessor of the Mojito is a mixed drink made by Sir Francis Drake, born in 1549. The latter improved the unpleasant taste of the rum of the time, sometimes called aguardiente instead, by mixing it with mint, lime (or lemon; the separation of the two is not always clear in Spanish) and sugar. This mixture also helped with stomach ailments and was very popular with the buccaneers. The Spaniards called Drake by his Spanish name Draque, and this Spanish name was also used to refer to his mixed drink. [1] [2] [3-64] [5] [7-132] [7-134] [9] [10] [25-481] There is also the statement that this mixed drink was drunk by Sir Francis Drake, but not developed by him. Rather, the inventor was Richard Drake. However, he was not related to Francis Drake, his captain. [3-64] [7-132] [9]

This statement is in the tradition that the seafarers of the Elizabethan age already knew of mint as a remedy for stomach problems, so it must also have been known to Francis Drake. He undertook privateering voyages on behalf of Queen Elizabeth to board Spanish ships. He was knighted for his services and loyalty to the English crown. [5] [9] [12] Rum on ships was not a matter of course at this time, for it was not until 1655 that Admiral Penn, who had conquered Jamaica for England, replaced the daily beer ration on his ships with rum. It was not until 1731 that the British Admiralty made a daily rum ration compulsory for all ships. [5] [8-109]

In the novella “El Cólera en Habana”, published in 1838, the draque is mentioned. There it says: “I take a draquecito every day at eleven o’clock and it does me good“. [3-64] [9] [11] [25-481]

But as José Alfonso Castro Gómez knows from his studies and after reviewing Campoamor’s book, this theory is only a conjecture. There is no evidence for it, and it will almost certainly only be a myth. [1] [10] [25-481]

What other reports are there about the origin of the Mojito? We have summarised them briefly below.

The Mojito of Emilio Gonzales

Plaza Hotel, Havanna, around 1937.
Plaza Hotel, Havanna, around 1937. [14]

In the 1930s, the bar of the Plaza Hotel was frequented by many foreign tourists and by Havana’s bourgeoisie. The famous bartender Emilio Gonzales, also known as the “King of Bartenders”, worked there. He created the Mojito on the basis of a Mint Julep. [10]

The Mojito from “La Concha” Beach

According to Erasmo Brito, a former member of the “Club de Cantineros de la Républica de Cuba”, which existed from 1924 to 1961, the Mojito was created in the first decade of the 20th century. Around 1910, a bar in Marianao, a district of Havana, located on a beach called “La Concha”, was very popular. A bartender named Rogelio worked in the bar, who had received the recipe for the Mojito from a colleague whose name is unknown and who worked in an aristocratic club on the same beach. [9] [10] [25-481]

The Mojito from the “Siboney” beach

Jesús Piña Despaigne, a very popular bartender in Santiago de Cuba, tells us that the Mojito originated in Santiago. Many cocktails were invented here, which were then brought to Havana and other places, such as the Daiquiri. The Mojito was invented on a beach called “Siboney” by Mr. Méndez, a native of Santiago who died of a heart attack in 1957 or 1958. There were three bars on that beach, they experimented with mint there, and out came the Mojito. [10] But there is no real proof for this theory. [10]

Der Bodeguita-Mojito

Ernest Hemingway expressed: “My Mojito in the Bodeguita and my Daiquiri in the Floridita“. The owner of the bodeguita, a Mr Martinez, was the creator of the Mojito. [10] But when he opened his bodeguita, the Mojito was already known throughout Havana. He bought it in 1942 and changed its name to Bodeguita del Medio on 26 April 1950. So the Mojito could not have originated here. [10]

From New Orleans to Havana

With Prohibition, many North Americans came to Cuba. They were used to drinking Mint Juleps, a combination of mint, lemon, bitters, sugar and bourbon. This is what they wanted to drink in Cuba. However, there was no bourbon there, but rum. The vast majority of Cuban bartenders replaced the bourbon with rum and supplemented the whole thing with soda water. [10] Some are of the opinion that the interpretation of the Mojito as a variant of the Mint Julep came instead from an American bartender who had gone to Cuba because of Prohibition. [1]

The Mojito of the Slaves

The Mojito was invented by slaves on Cuban sugar cane plantations in the late 19th century. [3-64] [4]

The Mojito of the farmers

The Mojito was invented by farmers in Cuba in the late 19th century, then became popular in Havana, and subsequently in other places. [6-241]

Conclusion

We are not alone in thinking that probably all these interpretations are nothing more than myths, because there is no clear evidence for any of them. [10]

How long has the Mojito been around?

The time of origin of the Mojito is somewhat uncertain. Some say it originated at the end of the 19th century, [3-64] or it was around 1910, [2] [7-134] others speak of the 1920s. [1] Basically, the prevailing opinion is that the Mojito was originally a Cuban drink and that it was very popular among Americans during Prohibition. [2] [3-64] [5] [7-131] [9] [10]

The name

The term “Mojito”, it is said, comes from the Spanish word “mojo”, which is used to describe a Cuban sauce or spice mixture that originated in the Canary Islands. Various ingredients are mixed in it, including citrus fruits, and generally garlic, onion, chilli and other spices. There are different recipes for its preparation. Sometimes this spice sauce is also called “mojito” in Cuba. [2] [4] [9] [10] [19] [20]

Some, however, say that “mojo” means soul, so the Mojito would be a little soul. [1]

Another interpretation says that the origin of its name lies in West Africa. There, a “mojo” is a cloth bag full of magical spices and magic objects. Thus, a Mojito is nothing other than a small magic or a small magic bag. [2] [7-131] [9]

Also under discussion for the origin of the name is the theory that the name Mojito is a variation of the Spanish word mojado (wet) or mojar (to make wet). [2] [4] [9]

However, we have not found a really good reason why one or the other interpretation should be correct; but we have come to our own conclusion based on the sources.

Our conclusion

Anonymus: El arte de hacer un cocktail. Havanna, 1927. Page 172.
Anonymus: El arte de hacer un cocktail. Havanna, 1927. Page 172. [15-172]

The first printed recipe we could find dates back to 1927. In the book “El arte de hacer un cocktail” a Mojo Criolo is listed. [15-172] However, this is basically the recipe for a Daiquiri: it consists of rum, lime and sugar. Mint is not used. This now raises a question that no one seems to have considered yet: Is the predecessor of the Mojito perhaps even the Daiquiri? We will go into this question in more detail later.

Juan A. Laser: Libro de cocktail. The Cocktail Book. 1929. Page 38-39.
Juan A. Laser: Libro de cocktail. The Cocktail Book. 1929. Page 38-39. [16-38] [16-39]

This is followed in 1929 by Juan A. Laser’s “Libro del cocktail” with the recipe for a Rum Cocktail, also called “Rum Mojo”, consisting of sugar, lime juice and lime peel, mint, Bacardi and soda water. Even though this mixture is called a rum cocktail, it is clearly a Mojito. [16-38] [16-39]

Gerardo Corrales: Club de Cantineros. La Habana, 1930. Page 112.
Gerardo Corrales: Club de Cantineros. La Habana, 1930. Page 112. [17-112]

It was not until 1930 that we found the name “Mojito” in Gerardo Corrales’ “Club de Cantineros de la Republica de Cuba”, for a mixture of sugar, lime, rum, mint and mineral water. [17-112]

It is striking that all the publications first appear in Cuba. It was not until 1935 that Albert Stevens Crocket included the Mojito in his book, and it is the first recipe we could find that was published outside Cuba. So there is a lot to suggest that the Mojito either originated in Cuba, or was at least popularised there.

In our opinion, a look at these recipes also allows us to draw conclusions about the origin of the name. The Mojo Criollo from 1927 corresponds in principle to a Daiquiri. As an analysis of the Daiquiri shows, the original Daiquiri, as conceived by Jennings Cox, was a rum punch, prepared with a lot of water.

The Rum Cocktail of the Year 1929 also seems to be in this tradition. It uses soda water instead of still water and also mint. It can therefore be understood as a variation of the Daiquiri Punch, garnished with additional mint. Its dual-language name is also revealing. The Rum Cocktail is also called Rum Mojo. This gives us a clue that mojo does not just mean the familiar sauce, as Erasmo Brito states that the term “mojo” also generally just means something like “mixture.” [10] Just as any mixed drink is now generally referred to as a cocktail, it could be that the Rum Cocktail was referred to as a mixed rum drink, i.e. Rum Mojo. There is no other way to explain the equivalence. This train of thought is confirmed by the “Libro del cocktail” if one compares the Spanish part with the English. The successive mixed drinks in English are called Manhattan Cocktail (Dry), Rum Cocktail (Rum Mojo), Gin Cocktail, Creole Cocktail (Old Fashioned) and Dry Martini. In Spanish, on the other hand, it is written: Manhattan Cocktail (seco), Mojo de Ron, Mojo de Ginebra, Mojo Criollo (antiguo), Martini Cocktail – Dry (seco).

Finally, in 1930, the Rum Mojo became a Mojito. One can well imagine that the diminutive form prevailed because it was generally preferred. Perhaps the diminutive Mojito was used because the addition of soda water reduced the alcohol content, or perhaps just because it was considered chic. This idea would not be so far-fetched either. Isn’t it also often the case in German that people don’t drink a “Bier” (beer), but a “Bierchen” (little beer)?

We consider the derivation of the term Mojito as a diminutive of mojo, denoting a mixed drink in general, to be more coherent and credible than the other etymologies usually given, as this can really be proven with the sources given.

The ingredients in detail

Let’s now go into the individual ingredients of the mojito. What can we say about them?

George Sinclair believes in the origin of the Mint Julep, which is why he prepares the Mojito with crushed ice, as it is a “Cuban Mint Julep”. [1] However, whether you take this or cube ice, he says, depends on personal preference. Since a Mojito with cube ice contains more soda and the mint leaves therefore rise to the top, one should leave the leaves on the stem to fix them. [1] He also aptly adds that a Mojito made with ice cubes is like a Rum Collins with mint. [1] Others, however, disagree and say that the Mojito is not a Rum Collins. [10] We would like to contradict this statement.

Anistasia Miller and Jared Brown write: “Outside of Cuba, it’s virtually impossible to find a Mojito made the classic Cuban way. Was ice simply so expensive in Cuba that the bartenders there only put a few ice cubes in each drink? British pub owners are known to put only three or four ice cubes in their Gin Tonics for this very reason. Today, however, bartenders in London’s best bars always fill Mojitos to the brim with crushed ice. But it’s not mainly the ice that sets the Cuban Mojito apart.[9]

In any case, you should not add too much ice, otherwise the Mojito will become watered down too quickly. [10]

When asked whether lemon or lime should be used for a Mojito, George Sinclair answers that there are recipes for both. [1] He also writes that one should not muddle the lime but only use the juice, after all, one is preparing a Mojito, not a Caipirinha. [1]

The truth, however, lies somewhere in between. Because correctly, you should use neither lemon nor lime – by the way, this also applies when preparing a Daiquiri – because in Cuba they use a special variant called “limón criollo”. It is typical for Cuba. It is small, does not have much juice, but is very acidic. [10]

Anistatia Miller and Jared Brown agree, because for them the Mojito is a Rum Collins, which is why you should only use the juice. [2] [9] They write: “It is important to remember that the Mojito is an aromatized Rum Collins or Rickey. Many bartenders try to rusticate the recipe by muddling lime in the drink rather than using fresh lime juice or try to substitute brown sugar for white. These create interesting drinks but not Mojitos. The best Cuban versions always use lime juice and white castor sugar. The use of castor sugar is important as it acts as an abrasive on the mint releasing it’s fragrant oils without it being necessary to totally pulverize it as it so often the case. Also cracked rock ice is most appropriate not crushed ice, the dilution comes from the addition of soda. Crushed ice merely pulverizes the mint creating a green soup.[7-135] [9]

Regarding sugar, George Sinclair agrees. One should not use brown sugar. He writes that this variation probably stems from the idea that Cubans are poor and can only afford brown sugar. But this is wrong, he says, and you should use refined sugar, as in a Caipirinha. [1] Others write that one should use cane sugar. [2]

The use of crystalline sugar is said to help extract the mint flavours. Stir in a sprig of mint, without crushing the sprig, and stir the sugar and lemon juice for a few seconds to dissolve the sugar, adding a dash of soda water to facilitate the process. Then you should add a sprig of mint to macerate with the sugar residue in the liquid. However, one should not make the mistake of crushing or chopping the whole sprig, otherwise you will have crushed leaves in the drink and produce a visual disaster. Some Cuban bartenders therefore prefer to remove the macerated branch and add a new one for decoration. [10] Our own experiments have shown that it is not necessary to follow these instructions. An excellent Mojito can also be made with sugar syrup and without crushing the leaves. In our opinion, it is important to stir sufficiently to allow the mint aromas to pass into the liquid without crushing the leaves.

It is much more important to use a suitable mint. There are numerous types of mint. The most important mint for a Cuban Mojito is a variety called “Hierba Buena” in Cuba. This is a red-stemmed mint with the scientific name Mentha nemorosa, which is also called grove mint or Hemingway mint. It has a refreshing, less pungent aroma profile.[9] [10]

Some Cubans also add a dash of bitters on top of the finished Mojito, one uses Angostura Bitters, but this is not a common practice. [1] [9] [10]

The ancestry

We have not yet dealt with the question of which other drinks the Mojito probably descends from, even though it has already been mentioned in what has already been written. In general, after reviewing the given statements, one can only shortlist the Mint Julep, the Collins and the Daiquiri. So let’s take a look at each of these candidates.

Mint Julep

John B. Escalante: Manual del cantinero. Habana, 1915. Page 48.
John B. Escalante: Manual del cantinero. Habana, 1915. Page 48. [18-48]

It is regularly expressed that the predecessor of the Mojito is the Mint Julep. [1] [10] This opinion is also justified by the recipe for a Ron Bacardi Julep published in 1915 by John B. Escalante. [5] According to this recipe, one should make a Ron Bacardi Julep like a Mint Julep, but use a rum instead of the cognac. [18-48] But comparing this mixture to a Mojito is a bit of a stretch, as it is still a Julep by definition. The essential thing is missing: the dilution with soda water.

Collins

Anistatia Miller and Jared Brown are not the only ones to argue that the Mojito is a mint-flavoured Rum Collins and that all the more modern ways of making it evolved from it. [2] [5] [6-241] Jeff Berry also states in the Oxford Companion that the Mojito is essentially a Collins with mint. [25-481]

As early as 1946, Charles H. Baker wrote in his “Gentleman’s Companion” about the Sloppy Joe’s Mojito that it was nothing other than a Bacardi Collins. [21-76] David Embury, in his book “The Fine Art of Mixing Drinks”, published in 1948, sees it the same way: “The Rum Collins, decorated with sprigs of mint, is sometimes called a MOJITO” [22-280]

It should also be repeated here that a Collins is nothing more than a Punch made with soda water.

Daiquiri

We have already described in this article that the Mojito can also be regarded as a variation of the original Daiquiri, which was prepared as a punch. We went into more detail about this in the post about the Daiquiri.

Our conclusion

A Mojito is made with rum, lime juice, sugar and soda water. If we now take as a basis the nomenclature for a Punch presented in the sixth part of our series of contributions on the Punch, we must conclude that a Mojito is nothing other than a Modern Simple Punch refined with mint. The original Daiquiri, even more than its more modern variant, and the Collins are also nothing other than a Punch. So if you want to answer the question of which drink the Mojito evolved from, the answer has to be: From the Punch, and it is a variation of the Punch, which is only modified by the use of mint.

While the use of mint and the rest of the ingredients may suggest a Mint Julep and the use of mint in a Mojito may also be inspired by this, from our point of view a Collins or a Daiquiri, or more precisely the Punch, is a much more sensible predecessor. The path from Punch to Collins to Mojito is much shorter than from Julep to Mojito.

The Brooklyn Eagle from 1877

If we now postulate that a Mojito is nothing more than a Rum Collins refined with mint, we should not be surprised to find the same drink outside Cuba long before the Mojito appeared on the island. Others, too, have obviously had the same idea.

The Brooklyn Daily Eagle, 6. July 1877, page 2.
The Brooklyn Daily Eagle, 6. July 1877, page 2. [23]

As proof we quote from The Brooklyn Daily Eagle published on 6 July 1877. There it says: “THE BROOKLYN EAGLE, in an article upon Summer drinks, alludes to the “John Collins” as a beverage made of “water, soured with lemon juice, sugar, pepermint and a little old Santa Cruz rum!” and adds that it “was named after John Collins, an Irish actor of some repute!!” We really cannot allow the truth of history thus to be trifled with, and we must protest against such an interpretation of a venerable drink being accepted anywhere outside of the slums of Brooklyn, where we are not surprised that if concocted on this recipe it moves its devotees to devour the substance of the widow and the Presbyterian Church, to throw their wives out of third story windows, and to corrupt the virtue of Indipindint Aldermen. Soured water, peppermint, sugar and rum, forsooth! O, shame, where is thy blush? O, blush, where is thy shame? The “John Collins” proper is composed of half a lemon squeezed into a soda tumbler (half filled with pounded ice, or not, as individual tastes may dictate) a liberal wine glass of Old Tom gin – Holland’s may be substituted when Old Tom in unattainable, but the result is necessarily inferior – a bottle of soda and a heaping tablespoonful of powdered white sugar, last of all, the compound to be drunk immediately. It has a positive merry fragance of what Tennyson calls “the gin within the juniper,” an enlivening efferescense, an electric tang said to be peculiarly grateful to the palate of a morning. When for the Old Tom there is substituted Santa Cruz or Jamaica rum, the result is a “Masked Battery,” the significance of which name will be apparent to the philiosophical philologist or to the individual who absorbs several of them. This ambrosia was the invention of the head waiter at Limmer’s, the famous London hotel which passed out of existence last Winter. His name and occupation have been immortalized in verse: “My name is John Collins, head waiter at Limmer’s, Corner of Conduit street, Hanover square; My chief occupation is filling of brimmers For all the young gentlemen frequenters there.” The drink speedly received the approbation of the officers of the British Army, and is now poured by them as libations to the rosy fingered Aurora from Aldershott to Australia – “England’s morning, ‘John Collins,’ ” in the fine words of Webster, “following the sun and circling the world.” The beatific beverage was, by the way, introduced into the United States, at the Clarendon, in this city, some twenty years ago, by a very eminent officer of the Royal Artillary, now retired upon his honors in London.[23]

Mojito.
Mojito.
Sources
  1. https://archive.org/details/The_Mojito/mode/2up/search/mojito?q=mojito George Sinclair: The Mojito. 2007?
  2. https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mojito Mojito.
  3. https://archive.org/details/CubaAtACrossroadsTheNewAmericanStrategy/page/n59/mode/2up/search/mojito?q=Draquecito Daniel Bruno Sanz: Cuba at a Crossroads. The New American Strategy. ISBN 1-4392-3699-2. South Carolina, 2009.
  4. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mojito Mojito.
  5. https://mixology.eu/mojito-original-cocktail-rezept/ Der Mojito: Das Wiener Schnitzel der Bar? Von Gabriel Daun, 5. September 2015.
  6. Wayne Curtis: And a Bottle of Rum. ISBN 978-0-307-33862-4. New York, 2006.
  7. Miller/Brown: Cuba. The Legend of Rum. ISBN 0-9760937-8-2. First edition, 2009.
  8. Victoria Bar: Schule der Trunkenheit. ISBN 978-3-8493-0323-5. 1. Auflage 2013.
  9. Anistatia Miller und Jared Brown: Der Mojito. Mixology 5/2009, Seite 42-44.
  10. https://www.facebook.com/laguiadelcantinero/photos/completo-an%C3%A1lisis-sobre-el-mojito-cocktaildel-maestro-por-jos%C3%A9-alfonso-castro-g%C3%B3/1969539256656471/ COMPLETO ANÁLISIS SOBRE EL MOJITO COCKTAIL. Von José Alfonso Castro Gómez, Asociación Cantineros de Cuba, 1. October 2017.
  11. https://it-it.facebook.com/eziofalconi/photos/mojito-criollo-the-mojito-is/521436474586613/ Mojito Criollo. Von Arimo American Champage Bar, 24. April 2013.
  12. https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Francis_Drake Francis Drake.
  13. https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Francis_Drake,_por_un_artista_an%C3%B3nimo.jpg Sir Francis Drake, um 1580.
  14. https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Plaza_Hotel,_Havana,_Cuba.jpg Plaza Hotel, Havana, circa 1937.
  15. Anonymus: El Arte de Hacer Un Cocktail y Algo Mas. Havana, Compañia Cervecera Internacional S. A., without Jahr.
  16. Juan A. Laser: Libro de cocktail. The Cocktail Book. 1929.
  17. Gerardo Corrales: Club de Cantineros de la Republica de Cuba. Manual Oficial. La Habana, 1930.
  18. John B. Escalante: Manual del cantinero. Habana, 1915.
  19. https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kanarische_K%C3%BCche#Mojos Kanarische Küche – Mojos.
  20. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mojo_(sauce) Mojo (Sauce).
  21. Charles H. Baker, Jr.: The Gentleman’s Companion. New York, 1946.
  22. David A. Embury: The Fine Art of Mixing Drinks. New York, 1948.
  23. https://bklyn.newspapers.com/image/50377693/?terms=%22john%2Bcollins%22 The Brooklyn Daily Eagle, 6. July 1877, page 2.
  24. https://www.enotes.com/shakespeare-quotes/flaming-youth Shakespeare’s quotes: Flaming youth.
  25. David Wondrich & Noah Rothbaum: The Oxford companion to spirits & cocktails. ISBN 9780199311132. Oxford University Press, 2022.

Historical recipes

1927 Anonymus: El arte de hacer un cocktail. Seite 172. Mojo criollo.

Vasito de ron.
Gotas de limón.
Cucharadita de azúcar.
Sírvase en vasito mediano con hielo y cucharita.

1929 Juan A. Laser: Libro del Cocktail. Seite 38. Rum Cocktail (Rum Mojo).

Use a chilled glass.
In medium sized glass.
One teaspoonful of sugar.
The juice of a medium sized green lemon cut
in two parts.
The rind of one of these halves to be scraped
into strainer and poured into glass.
One Sprig of mint.
Several pieces of broken ice.
Two or three fingers of bacardi.
Fill glass with soda water.
Stir with large teaspoon.

1930 Gerardo Corrales: Club de Cantineros de la Republica de Cuba. Manual Oficial. Seite 112. Mojito.

En vaso de highball.
Cucharadita de azúcar.
Pedazos de hielo.
1/2 limón.
Vasito de ron.
Ramito de yerbabuena.
Complétese con agua mineral.

1930 Pedro Chicote: La ley mojada. Seite 193. Mojito Criollo-Cocktail.

Prepárese en vaso grande:
Unos pedacitos de hielo.
1 cucharada pequeña de azúcar en polvo.
1        —              —       de jugo de limón.
1 corteza de limón.
Unas hojitas de hierbabuena.
1 copita de ron Bacardi.
Remuévase con una cucharilla y termínese de lle-
nar de sifón.

1931 Blanche Z. De Baralt. Cuban Cookery. Rum Cocktail (Cuban mojo).

In medium size glass put:
One teaspoonful sugar
Juice and rind of a green lime
Sprig of mint
One jigger Bacardi Rum
Several pieces of ice
Fill glass with soda water. Serve
with long spoon.

1932 Anonymus: Sloppy Joe’s Cocktails Manual 1931-32. Seite 9. Mojito.

1 Teaspoonful of
sugar.
One half of a Lemon
1 Part of Rum.
Seltzer water.
Leaves of Mint.
Serve in a High Ball glass
with Cracked ice.

1932 Anonymus: Sloppy Joe’s Cocktails Manual 1931-32. Seite 13. Mojito.

The juice of a Lemon.
1 Teaspoonful of
sugar.
Leaves of Mint.
1 Part of Gin.
Seltzer water.
Serve in a High Ball glass,
with ice.

1932 Anonymus: Sloppy Joe’s Cocktails Manual 1932-33. Seite 9. Mojito.

1 Teaspoonful of sugar.
One half of a Lemon
1 Part of Rum.
Seltzer water.
Leaves of Mint.
Shell of lemon.
Serve in a High Ball glass with
Cracked ice.

1932 Anonymus: Sloppy Joe’s Cocktails Manual 1932-33. Seite 14. Mojito.

The juice of a Lemon.
1 Teaspoonful of sugar.
Leaves of Mint.
1 Part of Gin.
Seltzer water.
A shell of lemon.
Serve in a High Ball glass, with ice.

1933 Anonymus: Sloppy Joe’s Cocktails Manual. Seite 9. Mojito.

1 Teaspoon ful of sugar.
One half of a Lemon
1 Part of Rum.
Seltzer water.
Leaves of Mint.
Shell of lemon.
Serve in a High Ball glass with
Cracked ice.

1933 Anonymus: Sloppy Joe’s Cocktails Manual. Seite 14. Mojito.

The juice of a Lemon.
1 Teatpoonful of sugar.
Leaves of Mint.
1 Part of Gin.
Seltzer water.
A thell of lemon.
Serve in a High Ball glass, with ice.

1934 Anonymus: Bar La Florida, Cocktails. Mojito Criollo.

En un vaso de 8 onzas.                  Use 8-ounces glass.
Hielo menudo. Varias rami-         Cracked Ice.
tas hierba buena, la cáscara         Several sprigs pepper-mint.
de un limón con el jugo ex-         1 Lemon Peel, squeezing
primido dentro.                              juice into glass.
1 Cucharadita de azúcar.             1 Teaspoonful Sugar.
2 Onzas Ron Bacardí.                   2 Onces Bacardi Rum.
Agítese con una cuchara pa-       Stir with a spoon. Add spar-
jugo. Agréguese agua car-           kling water and serve with-
ra que la hierba suelte el             out straining.
bonatada y sírvase sin colar.

1934 Anonymus: Bar La Florida, Cocktails. Mojito Criollo No. 2.

En un vaso de 8 onzas.                  Use 8-ounces glass.
Hielo menudo.                                 Cracked Ice.
Varias ramitas hierba buena.       Several sprigs pepper-mint.
La cascara de un limón con         1 Lemon Peel, squeezing
el jugo exprimido dentro.             juice into glass.
1 Cucharadita de azúcar.              1 Teaspoonful Sugar.
2 Onzas Ginebra Gordon.             2 Onces Gordon’s Gin
Agítese con una cuchara pa-       Stir with spoon.
ra que la Agréguese agua car-     Add sparkling water and
bonatada y sirva sin colar.           serve without straining.

1934 Anonymus: Bar La Florida, Cocktails. Mojito Criollo No. 3.

En un vaso de 8 onzas.                  Use 8-ounces glass.
Hielo menudo.                                 Cracked Ice.
Varias ramitas hierba buena.       Several sprigs pepper-mint.
La cáscara de un limón ver-         1 Lemon Peel, squeezing
de con el jugo exprimido              juice into glass.
dentro del vaso.
2 Onzas Cognac Soberano.         2 Ounceas Soberano Cognac
Cucharadita de azúcar.                1 Teaspoonful Sugar.
Agítese con la cuchara pa-          Stir with spoon.
ra que la hierba sue!te el
jugo. Agréguese agua car-          Add sparkling water and
bonatada y sirva sin colar.          serve without straining.

1934 Anonymus: Sloppy Joe’s Cocktails Manual. Seite 9. Mojito.

1 Teaspoonful of sugar.
One half of a Lemon
1 Part of Rum.
Seltzer water.
Leaves of Mint.
Shell of lemon.
Serve in a High Ball glass with
Cracked ice.

1934 Anonymus: Sloppy Joe’s Cocktails Manual. Seite 14. Mojito.

The juice of a Lemon.
1 Teaspoonful of sugar.
Leaves of Mint.
1 Part of Gin.
Seltzer water.
A shell of lemon.
Serve in a High Ball glass, with ice.

1935 Albert Stevens Crockett: The Old Waldorf-Astoria Bar Book. Seite 136. Mojito.

Same as Bacardi Rickey, with little
Sugar and few sprigs of Mint
added

Seite 135. Bacardi Rickey.

Two lumps Ice in high-ball glass
Juice of half Lime
One jigger Bacardi
“Split” of aerated Water

1935 Anonymus: Bar La Florida Cocktails. Seite 42. Mojito Criollo.

En un vaso de 8 onzas.                  Use 8-ounces glass.
Hielo menudo. Vanas rami-          Cracked Ice.
tas hierba buena, la cáscara         Several sprigs pepper-mint.
de un limón con el jugo ex-          1 Lemon Peel, squeezing
primido dentro.                               juice into glass.
1 Cucharadita de azuúcar.           1 Teaspoonful Sugar.
2 Onzas Ron Bacardí.                    2 Onces Bacardi Rum.
Agítese con una cuchara pa-       Stir with a spoon. Add spar-
jugo. Agréguese agua car-            kling water and serve with-
ra que la hierba suelte el              out straining.
bonatada y sírvase sin colar.

1935 Anonymus: Bar La Florida Cocktails. Seite 42. Mojito Criollo No. 2.

En un vaso de 8 onzas.                   Use 8-ounces glass.
Hielo menudo.                                 Cracked Ice.
Varias ramitas hierba buena.       Several sprigs pepper-mint.
La cáscara de un limón con         1 Lemon Peel, squeezing
el jugo exprimido dentro.             juice into glass.
1 Cucharadita de azúcar.              1 Teaspoonful Sugar.
2 Onzas Ginebra Gordon.             2 Ounces Gordon’s Gin.
Agítese con la cuchara pa-           Stir with spoon.
ra que la hierba suelte el             Add sparkling water and
jugo. Agréguese agua car-           serve without straining.
bonatada y sirva sin colar.

1935 Anonymus: Bar La Florida Cocktails. Seite 45. Mojito Criollo No. 3.

En un vaso de 8 onzas.                  Use 8-ounces glass.
Hielo menudo.                                Cracked Ice.
Varias ramitas hierba buena.       Several sprigs pepper-mint.
La cascara de un limón ver­-         1 Lemon Peel, squeezing
de con el jugo exprimido             juice into glass.
dentro del vaso.
2 Onzas Cognac Soberano.          2 Ounceas Soberano Cognac
1 Cucharadita de azúcar.              1 Teaspoonful Sugar.
Agítese con la cuchara pa­-
ra que la hierba suelte el
jugo. Agréguese agua car­-           Add sparkling water and
bonatada y sirva sin colar.           serve without straining.

1935 Anonymus: Sloppy Joes Cocktail Manual. Seite 9. Mojito.

1 Teaspoonful of sugar.
One half a lime.
1 Part of Rum.
Seltzer water.
Leaves of Mint.
Shell of lime.
Serve in a High Ball glass with
Cracked ice.

1935 Anonymus: Sloppy Joes Cocktail Manual. Seite 11. Planter’s Punch.

The juice of a lime.
1 Teaspoonful of sugar.
Leaves of Minf.
1 Part ot Gin.
Seltzer water.
A shell of a lime.
Serve in a High Ball glass, [with]
ice.

1936 Anonymus: Sloppy Joe’s Cocktails Manual. Seite 9. Mojito.

1 Teaspoonful of sugar.
One half a lime.
1 Part of Rum.
Seltzer water.
Leaves of Mint.
Shell of lime.
Serve in a High Ball glass with
Cracked ice.

1936 Anonymus: Sloppy Joe’s Cocktails Manual. Seite 14. Mojito.

The juice of a lime.
1 Teaspoonful of sugar.
Leaves of Mint.
1 Part of Gin.
Seltzer water.
A shell of a lime.
Serve in a High Ball glass, with
ice.

1937 Anonymus: Bar Florida Cocktails. Seite 46. Mojito Criollo.

En un vaso de 8 onzas.                     Use an 8-ounce glass.
Hielo menudo. Varias rami-           Cracked Ice.
tas hierba buena, la cáscara           Several sprigs of Mint.
de un limón con el jugo ex-            1 Lemon Peel, squeezing
primido dentro.                                 juice into glass.
1 Cucharadita de azúcar.                 1 Teaspoonful Sugar.
2 Onzas Ron “Marti”.                        2 Ounces “Marti” Rum.
Agítese con la cuchara pa-             Stil with spoon.
ra que la hierba suelte el                Add sparkling water and
jugo. Agréguese agua car-              serve without straining.
bonatada y sírvase sin colar.

1937 Anonymus: Bar Florida Cocktails. Seite 46. Mojito Criollo Num. 2.

En un vaso de 8 onzas.                           Use an 8-ounce glass.
Hielo menudo.                                         Cracked Ice.
Varias ramitas hierba buena.               Several sprigs of Mint.
La cáscara de un limón con                  1 Lemon Peel, squeezing
el jugo exprimido dentro.                      juice into glass.
1 Cucharadita de azúcar.                       1 Teaspoonful Sugar.
2. Onzas Ginebra Gordon.                    2 Ounces Gordon’s Gin.
Agítese con la cuchara pa-                   Stil with spoon.
ra que la hierba suelte el                      Add sparkling water and
jugo. Agréguese agua car-                    serve without straining.
bonatada y sírvase sin colar.

1937 Anonymus: Bar Florida Cocktails. Seite 48. Mojito Criollo Num. 3.

En un vaso de 8 onzas.                         Use an 8 ounce glass.
Hielo menudo.                                       Cracked Ice.
Varias ramitas hierba buena.             Several sprigs of mint.
La cáscara de un limón ver-                1 Lemón Peel, squeezing
de con el jugo exprimido                     juice into glass.
dentro del vaso.
2 Onzas Cogñac Soberano.                 2 Ounces Soberano Cognac.
1 Cucharadia de azúcar.                      1 Teaspoonful Sugar.
Agítese con la cuchara para               Stir with spoon.
que la hierba suelte el jugo.              Add sparkling water and
Agréguese agua carbonata-               serve without straining.
da y sirva sin colar.

1937 Anonymus: Here’s How. A Great Mixer in Any Company. Seite 17. Mojito (Moe-Hee-Toe).

Juice 1/2 lime
1 jigger Bacardi white
Mint sprigs
1 teaspoon sugar
Squeeze juice 1/2 lime into highball glass,
add sugar and stir until juice is sweet-
ened. Add cube ice, jigger Bacardi, fill
from Sparklet Syphon. Garnish with mint
sprigs.

1937 Salvador Trullos Mateu: Recetario internacional de cock-tails. Seite 168. Mojito.

En vaso de highball.
Cucharadita de azúcar.
Pedazos de hielo.
Medio limón.
Vasito de BACARDI.
Ramito de hierbabuena.
Complétese con agua mineral SAN AGUS­-
TIN.

1938 Anonymus: Sloppy Joe’s Cocktail Manual. Seite 9. Mojito.

1 Teaspoonful of sugar.
One half a lime.
2 oz. of Rum.
Seltzer water.
Leaves of Mint.
Shell of lime.
Serve in a High Ball glass with
Cracked ice.

1938 Anonymus: Sloppy Joe’s Cocktail Manual. Seite 14. Mojito.

The juice of a lime.
1 Teaspoonfui of sugar.
Leaves of Mint.
2 oz. of Gin.
Seltzer water.
A shell of a lime.
Serve in a High Ball glass with
ice.

1938 Hyman Gale & Gerald F. Marco: The How and When. Seite 127. Movito Cocktail.

(5 oz. Glass)
Juice of 1/2 Lime
1 barspoon Sugar
1 jigger Cuban Rum
Fill with water
Dress with Mint

1939 Anonymus: Bar La Florida Cocktails. Seite 45. Mojito Criollo.

En un vaso de 8 onzas.                      Use an 8-ounces glass.
Hielo menudo. Varias rami-            Cracked ice.
tas hierba buena, la cás-                  Several sprigs of Pepper-
cara de un limón con el                   mint.
jugo exprimido dentro.                    1 Lemon Peel, squeezing
1 Cucharadita de azúcar.                  juice into glass.
2 Onzas Bacardí.                                1 Teaspoonful Sugar.
Agítese con la cuchara para            2 Ounces Bacardi.
que la hierba suelte el                      Stir with spoon.
jugo. Agréguese agua Ca-                Add sparkling water Canada
nada Dry y sírvase sin                      Dry and serve without
colar.                                                     straining.

1939 Anonymus: Bar La Florida Cocktails. Seite 45. Mojito Criollo No. 2.

En un vaso de 8 onzas.                     Use an 8-ounces glass.
Hielo menudo.                                   Cracked ice.
Varias ramitas de hierba                  Several sprigs of Pepper-
buena.                                                   mint.
La cáscara de un limón con             1 Lemon Peel, squeezing
con el jugo exprimido                      juice into glass.
dentro.                                                 1 Teaspoonful Sugar.
1 Cucharadita de azúcar.                 2 Ounces Urania Gin.
2 Onzas Ginebra Urania.                 Stir with spoon.
Agítese con la cuchara para           Add sparkling water Canada
que la hierba suelte el                     Dry and serve without
jugo. Agréguese agua Ca-               straining.
nada Dry y sírvase sin
colar.

1939 Anonymus: Bar La Florida Cocktails. Seite 47. Mojito Criollo No. 3.

En un vaso de 8 onzas.                  Use an 8-ounces glass.
Hielo menudo.                                Cracked ice.
Varias ramitas de hierba               Several sprigs of Pepper-
buena.                                                mint.
La cárcara de un limón ver-          1 Lemon Peel, squeezing
de con el jugo exprimido               juice into glass.
dentro del vaso.                               2 Ounces Soberano Brandy.
2 Onzas Coñac Soberano.             1 Teaspoonful Sugar.
1 Cucharadita de azúcar.               Stir with spoon.
Agítese con la cuchara para         Add sparkling water Canada
que la hierba suelte el                   Dry and serve without
jugo. Agréguese agua Ca-             straining.
nada Dry y sírvase sin
colar.

1939 Anonymus: Cuna del Daiquiri Cocktail. Seite 40. Bacardi Mojito.

En un vaso para high-ball ponga        In a highball glass with two
dos pedazos de hielo.                            cubes of ice.
El jugo de un limón.                              The juice of one lemon.
2 Gotas de amargo Angostura.            2 Dashes of Angostura bitters.
2 Onzas de Bacardí, Carta                   2 Ounces of Bacardí, White
Blanca.                                                     Label.
Llene el vaso con Agua Mi-                 Fill glass with Soda Water and
neral y adórnelo con ramitas             garnish with several sprigs of
de menta.                                                 mint.

1939 Anonymus: Cuna del Daiquiri Cocktail. Seite 41. Mojito Criollo No. 1.

En un vaso de 8 onzas.                     Use an 8-ounces glass.
Hielo menudo. Varias ramitas        Cracked ice.
de hierba buena, la cascara            Several sprigs of Peppermint.
de un limón con el jugo ex-            Green lemon Peel, squeezing
primido dentro.                                  juice into glass.
2 Onzas Bacardí.                                1 Teaspoonful Sugar.
1 Cucharadita de azúcar.                 2 Ounces Bacardí.
Agítese con la cuchara para que    Stir with spoon.
la hierba suelte el jugo. Agre-        Add sparking Canadá Dry water
gúese agua Canadá Dry y sír-         and serve without straining.
vase sin colar.

1939 Anonymus: Cuna del Daiquiri Cocktail. Seite 41. Mojito Criollo No. 2.

En un vaso de 8 onzas.                       Use an 8 ounces glass.
Hielo menudo.                                     Cracked ice.
Varias ramitas de hierba buena.      Several sprigs of Peppermint.
La cáscara de un limón verde           Green lemon peel, squeezing
con el jugo exprimido dentro           juice into glass.
del vaso.                                                 1 Teaspoonful Sugar.
1 Cucharadita de azúcar.                   2 Ounces Gin.
2 Onzas Ginebra.                                 Stir with spoon.
Agítese con la cuchara para que     Add sparkling water and serve
la hierba suelte el jugo. Agré-          without straining.
guese agua y sírvase sin colar.

1939 Anonymus: Cuna del Daiquiri Cocktail. Seite 42. Mojito Criollo No. 3.

En un vaso de 8 onzas.                        Use an 8 ounces glass.
Hielo menudo.                                       Cracked ice.
Varias ramitas de hierba buena.        Several sprigs of Peppermint.
La cáscara de un limón verde            1 Lemon Peel, squeezing juice
con el jugo exprimido dentro            into glass.
del voso.                                                  2 Ounces Brandy.
2 Onzas Coñac.                                     1 Teaspoonful Sugar.
1 Cucharadita de azúcar.                    Stir with spoon.
Agítese con la cuchara para que      Add sparking Canada Dry water
la hierba suelte el jugo. Agre-           and serve without straining.
guese agua Canada Dry y sír-
vase sin colar.

1939 Anonymus: Floridita Cocktails. Seite 47. Mojito Criollo No. 1.

En un vaso de 8 onzas.                          Use an 8-ounces glass.
Hielo menudo. Varias ramitas            Cracked ice.
de hierba buena, la cáscara de           Several sprigs of Peppermint.
un limón con el jugo expri-                 1 Lemon Peel, squeezing juice
mido dentro.                                           Into glass.
2 Onzas Havana Club.                          1 Teaspoonful Sugar.
1 Cucharadita de azúcar.                     2 Ounces Havana Club.
Agítese con la cuchara para que        Stir with spoon.
la hierba suelte el jugo. Agré-            Add sparking Canada Dry water
gúese agua Canada Dry y sír-             and serve without straining.
vase sin colar.

1939 Anonymus: Floridita Cocktails. Seite 47. Mojito Criollo No. 2.

En un vaso de 8 onzas.                          Use an 8-ounces glass.
Hielo menudo.                                        Cracked ice.
Varias ramitas de hierba buena.        Several sprigs of Peppermint.
La cáscara de un limón verde             1 Lemon Peel, squeezing juice
con el jugo exprimido dentro              into glass.
del vaso.                                                    1 Teaspoonful Sugar.
1 Cucharadita de azúcar.                      2 Ounces Gordom Gin
2 Onzas Ginebra Gordom.                   Stir with spoon.
Agítese con la cuchara para que        Add sparkiing water Canada Dry
la hierba suelte el jugo. Agré-             and serve without straining.
guese agua Canada Dry y sír-
vase sin colar.

1939 Anonymus: Floridita Cocktails. Seite 48. Mojito Criollo No. 3.

En un vaso de 8 onzas.                              Use an 8-ounces glass.
Hielo menudo.                                            Cracked ice.
Varias ramitas de hierba buena.            Several sprigs of Peppermint.
La cáscara de un limón verde                1 Lemon Peel, squeezing juice
con el jugo exprimido dentro                into glass.
del vaso.                                                       2 Ounces M. del Mérito Brandy.
2 Onzas Coñac M. del Mérito.               1 Teaspoonful Sugar.
1 Cucharadita de azúcar.                         Stir wlth spoon.
Agítese con la cuchara para que           Add sparkiing Canada Dry water
la hierba suelte el jugo. Agré-                and serve without stralning.
guese agua Canada Dry y sír-
vase sin colar.

1939 Anonymus: Sloppy Joe’s Cocktail Manual. Seite 10. Mojito.

Teaspoonful of sugar.
Juice of a lime.
2 oz. of Rum.
Seltzer water.
Leaves of Mint.
Shell of a lime.
Serve in a High Ball glass with Cracked
ice.

1939 Anonymus: Sloppy Joe’s Cocktail Manual. Seite 14. Jin Mojito.

The juice of a lime.
Teaspoonful of sugar.
Leaves of Mint.
2 oz. of Gin.
Seltzer water.
A shell of a lime.
Serve in a High Ball glass with ice.

1939 Charles H. Baker, Jr.: The Gentleman’s Companion, Volume II. Seite 76. Sloppy Joe’s Mojito.

SLOPPY JOE’S MOJITO, which Is a BACARDI COLLINS, PLUS
Cubans and snobbish Americanos can sneer all they please at
Sloppy Joe’s, the fact still remains that there are as good, and better,
and more varied cocktails suitable to our somewhat exacting taste
than any other spot in Cuba. Granted that the Vedado Club, the Coun-
try Club, the Nacional, La Florida – all have their known specialties,
still Sloppy Joe’s assortment is not with them.
This is a greatly improved rum collins, and is best made with Carta
de Oro Bacardi, or any good medium light Santa Cruz, Haiti, or
Barbados rum. If Jamaica is used, don’t use it straight, mix with white
rum, one part to four of latter.
Put several lumps of ice into a 16 oz collins glass, toss in 1 tsp sugar
or gomme, insinuate a spiral green lime peel about the ice, turn in 1 1/2
jiggers of Bacardi; white, or Gold Seal, and the strained juice of 1
small green lime – not a lemon. Stir once, fill with really good club
soda and garnish with a bunch of fresh mint . . . . If for a lady, use
grenadine instead of sugar.
WORDS to the LIQUID WISE No. XII, on the PRETTY SENSE
of USING VARIOUS COLOURED FRUIT SYRUPS for SWEET-
ENING ALL SORTS of COLLINS DRINKS
Mix the usual Tom or John Collins, only instead of using sugar use
raspberry, strawberry, mint, cherry, or other soda fountain syrups.
They add a slight bouquet and taste, make a pretty looking drink.
Vary by using stone bottle ginger beer for soda.

1940 Anonymus: Sloppy Joe’s Cocktails Manual. Seite 8. Mojito.

Teaspoonful of sugar.
Juice of a lime.
2 oz. of Rum Sloppy Joe’s.
Seltzer water.
Leaves of Mint.
Shell of a lime.
Serve in a High Ball glass with
Cracked ice.

1940 Anonymus: Sloppy Joe’s Cocktails Manual. Seite 11. Gin Mojito.

The juice of a lime.
Teaspoonful of sugar;
Leaves of Miut.
2 oz. of Gin.
Seltzer water.
A shell of a lime.
Serve in a High Ball glass with
ice.

1943 Oscar Haimo: Cocktail Digest. Seite 53. Mojito Highball.

2 oz. Rum
1 tsp. Sugar
Juice of Half Lime and rind
1 Cube Ice
Serve in highball glass
Fill with soda
Decorate with 3 sprigs of mint
Stir.

1944 Oscar Haimo: Cocktail Digest. Seite 64. Mojito Highball.

Juice of 1⁄2 Florida Seedless Lime and
rind
1 tsp. Sugar
2 oz. White Rum
Serve in highball glass with 2
cubes ice
Top with Sparkling Canada Dry Water
Stir
Decorate with few sprigs of
mint.

1946 Charles H. Baker, Jr.: The Gentleman’s Companion. Seite 76. Sloppy Joe’s Mojito.

SLOPPY JOE’S MOJITO, which Is a BACARDI COLLINS, PLUS
Cubans and snobbish Americanos can sneer all they please at
Sloppy Joe’s, the fact still remains that there are as good, and better,
and more varied cocktails suitable to our somewhat exacting taste
than any other spot in Cuba. Granted that the Vedado Club, the Coun­-
try Club, the Nacional, La Florida — all have their known specialties,
still Sloppy Joe’s assortment is not with them.
This is a greatly improved rum collins, and is best made with Carta
de Oro Bacardi, or any good medium light Santa Cruz, Haiti, or
Barbados rum. If Jamaica is used, don’t use it straight, mix with white
rum, one part to four of latter.
Put several lumps of ice into a 16 oz collins glass, toss in 1 tsp sugar
or gomme, insinuate a spiral green lime peel about the ice, turn in 1 1/2
jiggers of Bacardi; white, or Gold Seal, and the strained juice of 1
small green lime — not a lemon. Stir once, fill with really good club
soda and garnish with a bunch of fresh mint. . . . If for a lady, use
grenadine instead of sugar.

1946 Lucius Beebe: The Stork Club Bar Book. Seite 58. Mojito Highball.

2 oz. rum
1 tsp. sugar
juice of half lime and rind
1 cube ice
Serve in highball glass. Fill with soda. Dec-
orate with 3 sprigs of rind. Stir.

1946 Oscar Haimo: Cocktail and Wine Digest. Seite 71. Mojito Highball.

Juice of 1/2 Lime and rind
1 tsp. Sugar
2 oz. Rum
Serve in highball glass with 2
cubes ice
Tap with Sparkling Canada Dry Water
Stir
Decorate with few sprigs of
mint

1946 Trader Vic: Trader Vic’s Book of Food and Drink. Seite 57. Mojito.

I don’t know who originated this one, but
every bar in the West Indies serves it, practically
every rum recipe booklet gives the formula for
it, so my little collection of rum drinks would
hardly be complete without it. Such popularity
must be deserved, and it is. It’s a swell drink!
1/2 lime
1 teaspoon sugar
Mint leaves
2 ounces Puerto Rican rum (Ron Meiito, Boca
Chica, or Brugal)
Charged water
Squeeze lime and drop shell in 10-ounce glass;
add sugar to juice, add mint leaves, and fill glass
with shaved ice. Pour rum over ice and swizzle.
Add dash of charged water.

1946 Trader Vic: Trader Vic’s Book of Food and Drink. Seite 58. Mojito Criollo.

The La Florida’s version.
Cracked ice
Several sprigs of mint
1 lemon
1 teaspoon sugar
2 ounces Bacardi
Build in an 8-ounce glass; use peel and juice of
the lemon. Stir with spoon and fill glass with
sparkling water.

1947 Pedro Chicote: Cocktails mundiales. Seite 197. Mojito Criollo-Cocktail.

Prepárese en vaso grande:
Unos pedacitos de hielo.
Una cucharada pequeña de azúcar en polvo.
Una cucharada pequeña de jugo de limón.
Unas hojitas de hierbabuena.
Una copita de ron Bacardí.
Remuévase con una cucharilla y termínese de lle-
nar de sifón.

1948 Anonymus: Ron Daiquiri Coctelera Cocktail Book. Seite 22. Mojito Cocktail.

1 Teasponful ol sugar.
One half of a Lemon.
1 Part of Daiquiri Coctelera Rum.
Seltzer water.
Peel of lemon.
Decorate with Mint.
Serve in a highball glass with cracked ice.

1948 David Embury: The Fine Art of Mixing Drinks. Seite 280. Mojito.

PEDRO COLLINS or RUM COLLINS Use Cuban rum,
either white or gold label.
The Rum Collins, decorated with sprigs of mint,
is sometimes called a MOJITO (moe-hee’-toe).

Seite 280. Tom Collins.

1 tablespoonful Sugar Syrup
Juice of 1 medium-sized Lemon
3 to 4 ounces (2 jiggers) Gin
Stir together in Collins glass, add 4 large ice cubes,
fill glass with charged water, stir again quickly, and
serve. If Old Tom gin is used, reduce sugar by half.

1948 Hilario Alonso Sanchez: El Arte del Cantinero. Seite 436. Mojito.

En vaso de highball échese:
Cucharadita de azúcar.
Pedacitos de hielo.
1/2 limón.
Vasito de ron.
Ramito de hierbabuena.
Complétese con agua mi-
neral. Revuélvase.

1948 Trader Vic: Bartender’s Guide. Seite 339. Movito.

1 1/2 oz. Cuban rum                     1/2 tsp. sugar
.                              Juice 1/2 lime
Shake with cracked ice; strain over ice in 5-oz. glass. Stir
and fill with seltzer. Garnish with fresh mint.

1948 Trader Vic: Bartender’s Guide. Seite 403. Smashes and Mojitos.

Smashes and Mojitos seem to be miniature Juleps,
embodying the use of sugar, mint, shaved ice, and
strong liquor. Mojitos are a tropical version of a
Smash and are made with rums.

1948 Trader Vic: Bartender’s Guide. Seite 404. Mojito.

1/2 lime                                           3 sprigs mint
1 tsp. bar sugar                             2 oz. Puerto Rican rum
Squeeze lime and drop shell in 10-oz. glass; add sugar to
juice and mint leaves and muddle. Fill glass with shaved ice;
pour rum over ice; stir or swizzle until glass frosts. Add dash
of charged water; garnish with mint and serve with straws.

1948 Trader Vic: Bartender’s Guide. Seite 404. Mojito Criollo.

1 lemon                                          1 tsp. bar sugar
6 sprigs mint                                  2 oz. Bacardi
Cut lemon; squeeze halves and drop into 8-oz. glass; add
sugar and leaves of the sprigs of mint; muddle and fill glass
with shaved ice. Add rum; stir well and fill glass with seltzer
water. Serve with straws and garnish with mint.

1951 Ted Saucier: Ted Saucier’s Bottoms Up. Seite 170. Mojito.

Courtesy, The Colony Restaurant, New York City
Juice and rind 1/2 lime
1 teaspoon sugar
2 oz. rum
Serve in highball glass with 2 ice cubes. Fill with
soda water and top with sfrigs of mint.

1953 Anonymus: Esquire’s Handbook for Hosts. Seite 159. Mojito (or Mohito).

Juice of one-half lemon
Scant teaspoon sugar
1 jigger rum
Shake, strain into tall glass containing
ice cubes, fill with seltzer. Decorate
with fresh mint leaves.

1953 David A. Embury: The Fine Art of Mixing Drinks. Seite 283. Mojito.

PEDRO COLLINS or RUM COLLINS Use Cuban rum, either
white or gold label.
The Rum Collins, decorated with sprigs of mint, is sometimes
called a MOJITO (moe-hee’-toe).

Seite 283. Tom Collins.

1 tablespoonful Sugar Syrup
Juice of 1 medium-sized Lemon
3 to 4 ounces (2 jiggers) Gin
Stir together in Collins glass, add 4 large ice cubes, fill glass with
charged water, stir again quickly, and serve. If Old Tom gin is used,
reduce sugar by half.

1956 Patrick Gavin Duffy: The Official Mixer’s Manual. Seite 130. Mojito.

1-1/3 Jiggers Puerto Rican Rum
1/2 Lime
1 Teaspoon Sugar
Mint Leaves
Squeeze Lime into 10-ounce
glass and drop in Rind. Add
other ingredients and fill 2/3
full with shaved ice. Add Soda
Water, stir and serve.

1957 Lawrence Blochman: Here’s How. Seite 117. Mojito.

2 ounces light rum                    1/2 lime (juice and peel)
1 teaspoon sugar                       10 fresh mint leaves
Soda
Fill a 10-ounce glass half full of crushed ice, add the
sugar, lime, and mint leaves (bruised). Pour in the rum,
fill with cold soda, and stir.

1959 Anonymus: Manual de Cocteleria. Mojito Criollo.

Un vaso de ocho onzas
Una cucharadita de azúcar
Un ramito de yerbabuena
1/4 onza de jugo de limón
1 1/2 onza de Ron Carta Blanca
Pedazos de hielo y soda.

1960 Anonymus: Recetas para cocteles. Seite 43. Mojito Criollo.

En vaso de ocho onzas.
Una cucharadita de azúcar
Un ramito de yerbabuena
1/4 onza de jugo de limón
1 1/2 onza de Ron Carta Blanca
Pedazos de hielo y soda.

1961 Pedro Chicote – El bar en el mundo. Seite 172. Mojito Criollo Cocktail.

Prepárese en vaso grande:
Unos pedacitos de hielo.
Una cucharada pequeña de
azúcar en polvo.
Una cucharada pequeña de
jugo de limón.
Una corteza de limón.
Unas hojitas de hierbabuena.
Una copita de ron Bacardí.
Remuévase con una cuchari-
lla y termínese de llenar
de sifón.

1965 Robert London & Anne London: Cocktails and Snacks. Seite 87. Mojito.

2 ounces white label rum Juice and rind of 1/2 lime
1 teaspoon fine grain sugar Few sprigs of mint
This drink is similar to a Mint Julep except that it is made with rum.
Muddle a few sprigs of mint and the sugar in a tall highball glass. Add
rum, juice, and whole rind of lime. Fill with shaved ice and stir until
glass frosts. Garnish with an additional few sprigs of mint.

1966 Oscar Haimo: Cocktail and Wine Digest. Seite 70. Mojito Highball.

Juice of 1/2 Lime and rind. 1 tsp. Sugar. 2 oz. Rum
Serve in highball glass with 2 cubes ice. Top with Canada
Dry Club Soda. Stir. Decorate with few sprigs of mint.

1972 Trader Vic: Trader Vic’s Bartender’s Guide. Seite 392. Mojito – 1.

1/2 lime
1 teaspoon bar sugar
3 sprigs mint
2 ounces light Puerto Rican rum
Club soda
Squeeze lime juice into a 10-ounce glass; add spent shell. Add
sugar and mint leaves, and muddle. Fill glass with shaved ice.
Add rum. Stir or swizzle until glass frosts. Add a dash of soda.
Garnish with mint. Serve with straws.

1972 Trader Vic: Trader Vic’s Bartender’s Guide. Seite 392. Mojito – 2.

1/2 teaspoon bar sugar
6 or 7 mint leaves
2 ounces light Puerto Rican rum
1 dash dark Jamaica rum
Fill planter’s punch glass half full of shaved ice. Add sugar
and mint leaves. Bruise leaves on ice with a stirrer or mud­
dler. Fill glass with shaved ice. Add light rum. Stir thoroughly.
Float Jamaica rum. Decorate with fresh mint sprig dusted
with bar sugar.

1972 Trader Vic: Trader Vic’s Bartender’s Guide. Seite 392. Mojito Criolla.

1 lemon
6 mint sprigs
1 teaspoon bar sugar
2 ounces light Puerto Bican rum
Club soda
Cut lemon in half; squeeze juice into 8-ounce glass; add spent
shells. Add sugar and mint leaves. Muddle. Fill glass with
shaved ice. Add rum. Stir well. Fill glass with soda. Garnish
with mint. Serve with straws.

1973 Oscar Haimo: Cocktail and Wine Digest. Seite 70. Mojito Highball.

Juice of 1/2 Lime and rind. 1 tsp. Sugar. 2 oz. Rum
Serve in Highball Glass with 2 cubes Ice. Top with Canada
Dry Club Soda. Stir. Decorate with few sprigs of mint.

1977 Stan Jones: Jones’ Complete Barguide. Seite 341. Mojito.

Tail Glass Shake
Muddle 1/2 oz lime juice with
1/2 tsp sugar and
Several mint leaves
Leave lime shell in glass
Fill 2/3 with shaved ice
1-1/2 oz rum
Fill with soda
Mint leaf

1977 Stan Jones: Jones’ Complete Barguide. Seite 342. Mojito Criollo.

Substitute lemon juice for the
lime in MOJITO

1977 Stan Jones: Jones’ Complete Barguide. Seite 344. Movito.

Hiball Glass Shake
1-1/2 oz rum
3/4 oz lime juice
1/2 tsp sugar
Fill with soda, ice
Mint sprigs

2007 George Sinclair https://archive.org/details/The_Mojito/page/n3/mode/2up/search/mojito?q=mojito Mojito. Here is the Mojito recipe that I used while working at Match, with Dick Bradsell: 50 ml Havana Club 3 years old Rum, 15 ml Fresh Lime Juice, 10 ml Fresh Lemon Juice, 15 ml Sugar Syrup, 6-8 Mint Leaves (lightly muddled in the bottom of the glass). Build over crushed ice, and then churn the iced mixture with a bar-spoon (as vigorously as you can); Garnish with a lemon slice, lime wedge, and a finelooking sprig of Mint.

2009 Anistatia Miller & Jarred Brown: Cuba. The Legend Of Rum. Seite 135. Mojito Criollo. 50 ml Havana Club 3 years or Añejo Blanco; 25 ml lime juice; 2 teaspoons Castor sugar; 6-8 mint leaves and two stems of mint. Add all to highball glass; leave to infuse for a few minutes; Fill with cracked ice and a splash of soda. Garnish: stems of mint.

2010 Jason Kosmas & Dushan Zaric: Speakeasy, Classic Cocktails reimaged, from New York’s Employees Only Bar. Seite 79. Havana-Style Mojito. 3 pinches mint leaves; 1 1/2 teaspoon superfine sugar; 1/2 oz Mint Syrup; 1 1/4 oz lime juice; 1 3/4 oz Flor de Caña 4 year old rum; 1 oz club soda; 2 dashes Angostura bitters. Lightly muddle mint leaves with sugar in Collins glas. Add rest except soda and bitters; fill with ice cubes. Add soda; Garnish: bitters.

2011 Helmut Adam, Jens Hasenbein, Bastian Heuser: Cocktailian 1. Seite 190. Mojito. 5 cl weißer Rum; 4-5 Minzzweige; 2-3 Barlöffel weißer Rohrzucker oder 2 cl Zuckersirup; 2 cl Limettensaft; 4 cl Soda. Garnierung: Minze. Zubereitung: Minze anklatschen, zusammen mit dem Rest ins Glas geben, mit Würfeleis auffüllen.

2011 Helmut Adam, Jens Hasenbein, Bastian Heuser: Cocktailian 2. Seite 257. Mojito. 5 cl weißer Rum; 4-5 Minzzweige; 2-3 Barlöffel weißer Rohrzucker oder 2 cl Zuckersirup; 2 cl Limettensaft; 4 cl Soda. Garnierung: Minze. Zubereitung: Minze anklatschen, zusammen mit dem Rest ins Glas geben, mit Würfeleis auffüllen.

2011 Jim Meehan: Das Geheime Cocktail-Buch. Seite 181. Mojito. 6 cl Banks 5 Island Rum; 3 cl Zuckersirup; 2 cl Limettensaft; 8 Minzblätter und 1 Minzzweig als Garnierung. Zuckersirup und Blätter zerstoßen; rest hinzugeben, shaken, in Collinsglas mit Eis abseihen. 3 Cl Soda hinzugeben. Garnierung: Minzzweig.

2012 Philip Greene: To Have and Have Another. Seite 168. Mojito. 2 oz white rum; juice of 1 lime; 1 tsp. sugar or 3/4 oz simple sirup; 1-2 oz seltzer; 5 mint leaves. Shake all except seltzer, strain, pour seltzer. Garnish: Mint sprig.

2013 Tristan Stephenson: The Curious Bartender. Seite 157. Mojito. 10 mint leaves; 50 ml Bacardi rum; 25 ml lime juice; 12,5 ml sugar syrup; soda water. Gently muddle mint in glass; add rest; crushed ice; top with soda water. Garnish: mint sprig.

2014 David Kaplan, Nick Fauchald, Alex Day: Death & Co. Seite 147. Mojito. 6 mint leaves; 3/4 oz. simple syrup; 2 oz. Caña Brava rum; 1 oz. lime juice; 2 drops Angostura bitters; Gently muddle mint and syrup; add rest; quick shake; dump into glass; add crushed ice. Garnish: mint bouquet.

2014 Jeffrey Morgenthaler: The Bar Book. Seite 233. Mojito. 1 bunch mint; 15 ml 2:1 simple syrup; 60 ml white rum; 30 ml lime juice and 1 spent lime half; 60 ml soda water. Muddle 12 leaves and syrup; add rum and lime; fill with crushed ice; add soda water.

2015 Duggan McDonnell: Drinking the devil’s acre. Seite 125. Mojito. 10-15 mint leaves and 1 sprig; 60 ml white rum (Appleton Estate or Rhum Barbancourt); 30 ml lime juice; 30 ml cocktail syrup; 60 ml seltzer. Lightly muddle mint in glass. add rest, add ice. Garnish: mint sprig.

2016 André Darlington & Tenaya Darlington: The New Cocktail Hour. Seite 130. Mojito. 60 ml white rum (Flor de Caña 4 years); 22 ml lime juice plus rind of 1/2 lime; 6-8 mint leaves plus a sprig;30-60 ml sparkling mineral water. Gently muddle mint leaves; add rest; fill with crushed ice; top with mineral water. Garnish: mint sprig.

2016 Brian Silva: Mixing in the Right Circles at Balthazar London. Seite 78. Mojito. 50 ml Bacardi rum; 10 ml Myer’s dark rum; 3 lime wedges; 15 ml lime juice; 15 ml gomme; 6 mint leaves; soda water. muddle mint leaves and lime wedges; add lime juice and gomme, Bacardi rum and crushed ice; stir; add soda; float with dark rum.

2016 Sasha Petraske: Regarding Cocktails. Seite 195. Mojito. 8-10 mint leaves and whole mint sprigs; 30 ml lime juice; 22 ml simple syrup; 1 brown sugar cube; 60 ml white rum. gently muddle mint, lime juice, simple syrup and sugar cube; arr rum; pour into glas, add crushed ice. Garnish: mint sprigs.

2017 Gary Regan: The Joy of Mixology. Seite 252. Mojito. 4 lime wedges; 2 to 3 teaspoons grannulated sugar; 8 to 8 fresh mint leaves; 2 ounces light rum; club soda; garnish: 2 or 3 mint sprigs.

2017 Jim Meehan: Meehan’s Bartender Manual. Seite 249. Mojito. 2 oz. Caña Brava 3 year old rum; 1 oz club soda; 1 oz simple syrup; 0,75 oz lime juice; 8 mint leaves and 1 mint sprig; muddle mint and syrup, add rum and lime juice; shake; strain into glas with ice. Add club soda. Garnish: mint sprig.

2018 Alex Day, Nick Fauchald, David Kaplan: Cocktail Codex. Seite 134. Mojito. 10 mint leaves; 3/4 oz. simple syrup; 1 white sugar cube; 2 ounces Caña Brava white rum; 1 oz. lime juice. Gently muddle mint and syrup; add rest; quick shake; dump into glass; add crushed ice. Garnish: mint bouquet.

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About

Hi, I'm Armin and in my spare time I want to promote bar culture as a blogger, freelance journalist and Bildungstrinker (you want to know what the latter is? Then check out "About us"). My focus is on researching the history of mixed drinks. If I have ever left out a source you know of, and you think it should be considered, I look forward to hearing about it from you to learn something new. English is not my first language, but I hope that the translated texts are easy to understand. If there is any incomprehensibility, please let me know so that I can improve it.

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