Drinks

Daiquiri

Daiquiri.

The Daiquiri is usually made as a Sour. But that is not its original recipe. Rather, you have to think of it as a low-alcohol Punch. We reconstruct its history and its original recipe.

Sour version:

70 ml Eminente Rum 3 years
30 ml lime juice
20 ml sugar syrup (2:1)
Preparation: Shaken.

Punch version:

70 ml Eminente Rum 3 years
10 ml lime juice
6,25 ml sugar syrup (2:1)
40 ml water
Preparation: Shaken. Serve in a Collins glass with 4 ice cubes.

Cuban rum and Cuban drinking customs

If you want to understand the Daiquiri, you have to understand Cuban rum. The origin of this style of rum lies in the mid-19th century, when column distillation and charcoal filtering began to be used. [8-42] [17-97] This style was largely influenced by Facundo Bacardí. He came to Santiago de Cuba from Spain with his family in 1836 at the age of fifteen. In 1862 he acquired a rum distillery with one of his brothers. [12-166]

He was looking for a way to make the rum lighter, smoother and tastier. Using a new type of filter system, he succeeded in removing the heavier and oilier impurities. Presumably he used a filtration system of charcoal and sand; we don’t know for sure, because it remains a family secret to this day. His light rum produced in this way won a gold medal at the Philadelphia Centennial Exhibition in 1876. [12-167]

Soon there were imitators and the so-called Cuban style began to establish itself. Such a rum was easy to drink and mixed well with everything. [12-180]

Evening Star. 18. June 1898, page 23.
Evening Star. 18. June 1898, page 23. [16]

Bacardi’s rum became successful and was widely drunk. In 1898, a newspaper reporter reported on Santiago: “Opposite of the Club de San Carlos is the Cafe Venus, where, an enthusiastic traveler declares, as good a meal can be had as at Delmonico’s. There is less wine drunk in Cuba than in most Latin countries, but there is a native rum, called bacardi, which is made of molasses, and which, well mixed with water and cooled with ice, makes a very smooth sort of beverage and a somewhat insidious one. A quart bottle of this rum costs only 50 cents, and as a good deal of it is usually drunk at the midday meal it is not to be wondered at that a nap immediately follows it.[16]

Buffalo Evening News. 26. July 1899, page 2.
Buffalo Evening News. 26. July 1899, page 2. [15]

Diese Mischung aus Bacardí und Wasser, mit Eis gekühlt, trank man offensichtlich viel und oft, auch in seiner verfeinerten Form, bei der Sodawasser verwendet wurde. So berichtet im Jahr 1899 Laurence W. Miller über diese Mischung namens Mismo: [12-168] [12-169]Story of a Popular Drink. Laurence W. Miller, recently returned from Cuba, tells this story of how a popular drink received a singular name in a singular manner: “Mayor Bacardi of Santiago makes a very fine brand of rum, to which he has given his name,“ said Mr. Miller. “Not long ago a party of Spaniards and Americans were gathered together in the Cosmopolitan Club, which is the new name for the old Anglo-American Club. When the time came for a drink all around one of the Spaniards ordered Bacardi rum and seltzer. The next man said ‘So mismo,’ [sic!] which, being translated, means ‘the same.’ The Americans, not knowing the Spanish names of their pet drinks, all chimed in ‘mismo.’ Evidently the concoction pleased them, for the next day one of the Americans dropped in with some companions and ordered four ‘mismos.’ It happened that the same waiter was on duty, and he had intelligence enough to know what the Americans meant. Accordingly the Bacardi rum and seltzer was brought, and the waiter told the joke to all his friends. It spread with remarkable rapidity, until now every barkeeper in Santiago knows what you are after if you ask for a ‘mismo.’ In fact, you rarely ever hear Bacardi rum and seltzer spoken in any other way now.” – New York Tribune.[15]

The origin of the Daiquirí

We can see from these reports that around 1898 it was common practice in Cuba to drink Bacardí with ice and water or soda. This is the environment in which the Daiquirí was created, and it was created – as we will see – by adding a little lime juice and sugar.On the other hand, one often reads that the predecessor of the Daiquirí was the Canchánchara, a mixture of rum, lime juice and honey.  [8-136] Doch wer dies sagt, irrt. But those who say this are mistaken. The Canchánchara was not an alcoholic drink. Only since the 1980s has a recipe similar to the Daiquirí been called Canchánchara.

There are divergent stories about the origins of the Daiquirí, which we will address in the following.

1. Jennings Cox and Francesco Domenico Pagliuchi

Jennings Cox.
Jennings Cox. [18]

The most widespread account of the origins of the Daiquiri Cocktail tells of a meeting between Jennings Stockton Cox and Francesco Domenico Pagliuchi. The former was the manager of a company that exploited Cuba’s iron ore mines. Both were members of the American Institute of Mining Engineers. In addition, Francesco Domenico Pagliuchi was a correspondent for Harper’s Monthly. In 1940, Emilio “Maragato” González, a bartender, died. [3-121] The editor of El Pais wrote in his obituary that he had invented the Daiquiri. Francesco Domenico Pagliuchi wrote a letter to the editor on this occasion: [3-121]

Hilario Alonso Sanchez El arte del cantinero. 1948, page 275.
Hilario Alonso Sanchez El arte del cantinero. 1948, page 275. [4-275]

“Sr. Director de “El País”, Habana. Muy señor mío: En su apreeiable periódico “El País”, edición de la tarde de hoy, he leído un artículo titulado, “Murió anoche “Maragato”, el inventor del “Daíquirí”. Permítame aclarar que el delicioso “Daiquirí” no se inventó en La Habana, sino en las minas de Daiquirí, por el Ingeniero Cox, director de esas minas y el que suscribe. Concluida la guerra de independencia de Cuba, en la cual tuve parte muy activa, conseguí capital americano para reactivar las viejas minas del Cobre, situadas cerca de Santiago de Cuba, de las cuales yo era el director; mientras estaba ocupado en este trabajo, tuve ocasión de ir a Daiquirí para hablar con el señor Cox. Concluido el asunto que me llevara a Daiquirí, le pregunté al señor Cox si me iba a convidar con un cock-tail. En el aparador del comedor de las minas, no había ni gin ni vermouth; sólo había Bacardí, limones, azúcar y hielo. Con estos elementos hicimos un cock-tail bien batido y muy frío que me gustó mucho. Entonces le pregunté a Cox: —Y esto ¿cómo se llama? Él contestó: “Rum Sour”. En los Estados Unidos hay una bebida que se llama “Whisky Sour”, que se hace con whisky, azúcar, jugo de limón y hielo, pero yo le dije: “Este nombre es muy largo, ¿por qué no llamarlo Daiquirí? Después, fuimos para Santiago de Cuba; en el Bar del “Club Americano”, donde ya había unos cuantos conocidos, pedimos un Daiquirí. El Cantinero contestó que no sabía lo que era. Entonces Cox le explicó cómo se hacía, recomendando batirlo hasta servirlo muy frío. Algunos de los amigos que estaban en el Bar, también pidieron un Daiquirí. A todos les gustó, y muy pronto este cock-tail se hizo popular en Santiago, de donde pasó a La Habana y hoy tiene fama mundial. Lo arriba descripto es la verdadera versión de cómo se inventó el famoso “Daiquirí”. “De usted atento S. S. Ingeniero P. D. Pagliuchi, comandante del Ejército Libertador de Cuba”.[4-274] [4-275]

Anistatia Miller and Jarred Brown find it noteworthy that in this text Francesco Domenico Pagliuchi speaks of “limón”, i.e. lemon, not of “lima” (lime) or “limónes criollos” (key limes). [3-124] However, the lime can also be called limón, so we must not overstate this objection. [5]

This general disagreement about whether lime or lemon is meant is evident in many places. One example is the book of the Bar La Floridita, published in 1937. In Spanish it says “limón verde”, which clearly means lime, alias “green lemon”, but in the English translation next to it it says “lemon”. [9-24]

There is a small inaccuracy in Francesco Domenico Pagliuchi’s report. There was only one Anglo-American Club in Santiago de Cuba. The American Club, on the other hand, was in Havana. [3-128]

2. Jennings Cox and Harry E. Stout

Charles H. Baker The Gentleman's Companion. 1939, page 30-31.
Charles H. Baker The Gentleman’s Companion. 1939, page 30-31. [6-30] [6-31]

In 1939, however, Charles H. Baker reported a somewhat different story: “The 2 originators were my friend Harry E. Stout, now domiciled in Englewood, New Jersey, and a mining engineer associate, Mr. Jennings Cox. TIME: summer of 1898. PLACE: Daiquiri, a village near Santiago and the Bacardi plant, Cuba. Hence the name “Daiquiri.”[3-124] [6-30] [6-31]

What are we to make of this alternative story? There was no Harry E. Stout, only a Henry E. Stout. According to his 1918 passport application, he resided in Port Limon, Costa Rica (from 1901 to 1903), Yucatan, Mexico (1904-1905) and Felton, Cuba (1911 to October 1916). He gave Camaguey, Cuba, as his residence and was workshop foreman there for the Cuba Railroad, an American company. At the time of his passport application in 1918, he was retired and planning to visit relatives in Audobon, New Jersey. He was not an engineer as described by Charles Baker. While it is possible that he travelled to Cuba before moving to Costa Rica, there is no record of him on any passenger list for those leaving the USA. [3-125]

3. Bacardí’s Story

Gran Hotel "Venus", Santiago de Cuba. Bar, café and barber shop.
Gran Hotel “Venus”, Santiago de Cuba. Bar, café and barber shop. [19]

In the 1930s, another story circulated, told by Facundo M. Bacardí, published in The Miami Herald on 14 March 1937: “Origin Is Disclosed of Daiquiri Cocktail: One of Group of American Engineers Named the Drink at Santiago Bar. … Shortly after the Spanish-American war, there was a popular trysting plce in Santiago, known as the Venus bar. One day a group of American engineers who had come into town from the Daiquirí mines were imbibing their favourite drinks in this restful spot. … A joval fellow by the name of Cox spoke up. “Caballeros y amigos, we have been enjoying this delicious mixture for some time, but strange to admit the drink has no name. Don’t you think it is about time something was done to extricate us from this sad predicament?” It was unanimously agreed that the drink should be named without further procrastrination. There was silence for several minutes as each man became immersed in deep thought. Suddenly Cox’s voice was heard again. “I have it, men! Let’s call it the ‘Daiquirí’,” and so it was named.[3-129] [3-130]

Hotel Venus und Katedrale, Santiago de Cuba.
Hotel Venus und Katedrale, Santiago de Cuba. [20]

A recipe is also given in the text: “The juice of half a large, or one small lime was squeezed into a shaker containing one teaspoonful of granulated sugar. Two ounces of Ron Bacari (Carta Blanca) were added and a generous quantity of shaved ice prepared the shaker for frosting. When the mixture was thoroughly frapped it was then poured (not strained) into a chilled glass known as a “flute”.[3-130]

At this point, let’s recall the newspaper article from 1898 quoted earlier, according to which one can dine very well at Café Venus, and that in Cuba they drink Bacardí with water and ice.

Basil Woon When it's Cocktail Time in Cuba. 1928, page 39.
Basil Woon When it’s Cocktail Time in Cuba. 1928, page 39. [24-39]

This story was already published in less detail in the book “When it’s Cocktail Time in Cuba”, published in 1928: “One morning in the Venus Cox said: “Boys, we’ve been drinking this delicious little drink for some time, bit we’ve never named it. Let’s christen it now. The boys milled around a bit and finally Cox said: “I’ll tell you what, lads – we all work at Daïquiri and we all drank this drink first there. Let’s call it a daïquiri!” The daïquiri is now the best-known drink in Cuba. This recipe for the real daïquiri was given me by Facundo Bacardi and confirmed by one of the men who was present at the christening: half one lime, squeezed onto one teaspoonful of sugar; pour in onw whiskey-glassful of bacardi; plenty of ice; shake until shaker is thoroughly frosted outside. Meanwhile, chill a tall wine-glass of the kind known as a flute, fill it with shaven ice, and pour in the mixture. Must be drunk frozen or is not good.[24-39]

4. Another narrative

An article on Wikipedia states that the persons said to have been present at the Venus Bar were, in addition to Jennings Cox, the American engineers J. Francis Linthicum, C. Manning Combs, George W. Pfeiffer, De Berneire Whitaker, C. Merritt Holmes and Proctor O. Persing. Unfortunately, no source is given for this statement. [3-132] [7] Anistatia Miller and Jarred Brown have searched passenger lists and have found records for the chemist J. Francis Linithicum, the miner C. Mannings Combs, George W. Pfeiffer and Proctor O. Persing. The latter travelled from Santiago de Cuba to New York on board the SS Prinz August Wilhelm on 15 September 1911. Also on board this ship were Facundo Bacardí and Arturo Schueg, son of Henri Schueg, Emilio Bacardí’s brother-in-law and largely responsible for Bacardí’s international marketing. [3-132] [3-133] [3-134]

5. William Shafter

However, the military officer William Shafter is also said to have invented the Daiquiri. He landed near Santiago in 1898 during the Spanish-American War. He is said to have tasted a drink made by Cuban patriots, mixed together from rum, lime juice and sugar. He liked it and thought the only thing missing was ice. He added it – and that is how the Daiquiri is said to have been created. [12-170] [12-171]

Which story is true?

Let’s summarise the various origin myths once again:

  1. Francesco Domenico Pagliuchi reports how he visited Jennings Cox in Daiquirí and was served a rum punch by him. The former gave this mixed drink the name Daiquirí.
  2. Charles H. Baker reports that Harry E. Stout and Jennings Cox invented the Daiquirí together in Daiquirí in the summer of 1898.
  3. Facundo Bacardí tells us that a group of American engineers, including Jennings Cox, met in Santiago de Cuba in the bar of the Hotel Venus. There Jennings Cox gave the name Daiquirí to the mixed drink that the group had been drinking for some time. It has been handed down which persons were part of the group, and one of them, Proctor O. Persing, met Facundo Bacardí and Arturo Schueg, who was responsible for Bacardí’s international marketing, on the SS Prince August Wilhelm in 1911.
  4. The officer William Shafter is said to have tasted a mixture of rum, lime juice and sugar near Santiago de Cuba in 1898. He added ice, and that is how the Daiquiri is said to have been born.

These myths contradict or complement each other. If we had to put forward a thesis, it would be this: The most credible account is that of the eyewitness: Francesco Domenico Pagliuchi was served a Rum Punch by Jennings Cox and gave it the name Daiquirí. One may assume that this Rum Punch was not a spontaneous invention, but an everyday drink for Jennings Cox, because at that time it was common to drink Bacardí with water and ice, and adding some citrus juice and sugar is nothing unusual. It’s simply an iced Rum Punch. His friends and acquaintances may also have enjoyed this drink when they met. Later, when Jennings Fox visited the bar of the Venus Hotel, he recalled his meeting with Francesco Domenico Pagliuchi, and also suggested the name Daiquirí to his friends. The two accounts do not contradict but complement each other. Only the account by Charles H. Baker does not quite fit into the overall picture and seems to be the least credible. But perhaps it was similar to the Venus Bar. Harry E. Stout came to Daiquirí and was served the Rum Punch, which Francesco Domenico Pagliuchi had previously called Daiquirí. Then this story also fits. The account of William Shafter can also be considered credible. It merely states that he added ice to a local mixture of rum, lime juice and sugar, but not that he had already called it a Daiquiri.

The Daiquiri comes to Havana

Regardless of what exactly happened, there is no doubt that a Rum Punch prepared by Jennings Cox was given the name Daiquirí. This name spread and reached Havana. [8-139] It came to the Venus Hotel in Santiago de Cuba and then also to the Plaza Hotel in Havana. [8-139] The aforementioned Emilio Gonzáles, also called Maragato, worked there. [8-139]

Constantino Ribalaigua preparing his Daiquiri at La Floridita.
Constantino Ribalaigua preparing his Daiquiri at La Floridita. [21]

Another bartender, Constantino Ribalaigua Vert, took over the La Floridita in Havana in 1918. He had learned about the Daiquiri from Emilio Gonzáles in the nearby Plaza Hotel and developed it further. This is how the variant called “Hemingway Special” was created, but also other variants, which were numbered consecutively for the sake of simplicity, from Daiquiri No. 1 to Daiquiri No. 4. [8-139] [12-172] [12-173]

Anonymus Bar La Floridita. Habana, 1937, page 9.
Anonymus Bar La Floridita. Habana, 1937, page 9. [9-9]

In 1937, the journalist Jack Cuddy described how Constantino prepared a daiquiri: “His repertoire, I learned, includes the three of Cuba’s most popular cocktails – Daiquiri No. 4, the Presidente and the Pepin Rivero – all his own inventions The Daiquiri No. 4, it developed, is his ace in the hole and this how its done: You take two ounces of “Martí” Rum and toss it into a cocktail shaker. Add one teaspoon of finely granulate sugar. Do not use powdered sugar which Constantino insits has starch in it. Then add one teaspoon of Marraschino – a cordial which is made from wild cherries grown in Dalmatia. Squeeze in the juice of half a lime. Next toss in finely shaved ice until the shaker is nearly full. This ice must be shaved so fine that it’s almost snow. Do not use scracked ice. Then place the shaker under an electric mixer one of those malted milk stirrers in American Drug stores. Let it stir for about three minutes. If you haven’t an electric mixer, shake it rapidly in a regular cocktail shaker for about four minutes. Meanwhile chill your glasses by pouring in cracked ice and a bit of water. Now – toss out the cracked ice and water, and strain your Daiquiri from the shaker into the glasses through a half-strainer – one that is not too fine.[9-9]

Further on in the book, the other Daiquiri recipes are given. However, it is noticeable that there is a deviation from Jack Cuddy’s description. Daiquiri No. 4 is prepared with crushed ice and served as a frappé.

Anonymus Bar La Floridita. Habana, 1937. page 24 & 26.
Anonymus Bar La Floridita. Habana, 1937. page 24 & 26. [9-24] [9-26]

“Daiquiri Num. 1. 2 Ounces “Martí” Rum. 1 Teaspoonful of Sugar. Juice of 1/2 Lemon. Cracked Ice. Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.[9-24] It should be noted here that even in this book there is a commonly committed translation error that regularly causes much confusion. The Spanish original says “limón verde”. This is translated into English as “lemon”, although it should be “lime”.

Daiquiri Num. 2. 2 Ounces “Martí Rum. Several Dashes Curacao. 1 Teaspoonful Orange Juice. 1 Teaspoonful Sugar. Juice of 1/2 Lemon. Cracked Ice. Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.[9-24]

Daiquiri Num. 3. 2 Ounces “Martí Rum”. 1 Spoonful Sugar. 1 Teaspoonful Grape Fruit Juice. 1 Teaspoonful Marrasquino. Juice of 1/2 Lemon. Shake well and strain into cocktail glass. Serve frappe.[9-26]

“Daiquiri Num. 4. 2 Ounces “Martí” Rum. 1 Spoonful Sugar. 1 Teaspoonful Marrasquino. Juice of 1/2 Lemon. Shake well with cracked ice. Serve frappe.[9-26]

Anonymus: Bar La Floridita. Habana, 1937, page 15.
Anonymus: Bar La Floridita. Habana, 1937, page 15. [9-15]

Interestingly, the recipes of La Floridita Bar do not indicate a Bacardí rum, but a “Martí” rum. Fortunately, there is also an advertisement for this rum in the book, so we can understand what kind of rum was used. The “Ron Marti Especial” is advertised as an “extra viejo” rum of the “Compania Cubana de Ron S.A.” from Havana. [9-15] We may therefore assume that the Daiquiris in La Floridita were prepared with a Cuban rum. Since the recipes did not call for “Martí especial”, but only “Martí”, it is probably a shorter-aged version. Rum is mentioned very often in the book. Perhaps because the company subsidised the printing of the book? So it is quite possible that a different Cuban rum was used in the bar. By the way, in the other editions of the work, a Bacardi rum is given.

The Waring Blender, pictured in: Evening Star. 10 December 1940, page B-6.
The Waring Blender, pictured in: Evening Star. 10 December 1940, page B-6. [10]

The use of an electric blender was the great evolution of the Daiquiri. When the “Waring blender” came on the market in the USA in 1938, La Floridita was among the first to use it. [8-140]

But contrary to what is commonly said, the use of such a mixer was already common practice before. In his book “Club de cantineros de la Republica de Cuba”, published in Havana in 1930, Gerardo Corrales reported on the “Daiquiri Frapé Cocktail” that an electric mixing cup should be used for preparation.[31-35]

Ernest Hemingway

Ernest Hemingway set a literary monument to this type of Daiquiri in his novella “Islands in the Stream”, published posthumously in 1970: “He was drinking another frozen Daiquirí with no sugar in it and as he lifted it, heavy and the glass frost-rimmed, he looked at the clear part below the frapped top and it reminded him of the sea. The frapped part of the drink was like the wake of a ship an the clear part was the way the water looked when the bow cut it when you were in shallow water over marl bottom. That was the exact color.[8-141] [22-77] [22-78] [12-174] [12-175]

Hemingway Statue at La Floridita, erected in 2003.
Hemingway Statue at La Floridita, [11] erected in 2003. [12-183]

A Daiquiri version was created especially for Ernest Hemingway. He lived in Cuba from 1939 to 1960. At first, he lived in room 511 in the Ambos Mundos Hotel at Calle Obispo 153, where he began writing his novella “For Whom the Bell Tolls”. At the other end of the street was the La Floridita, and he became a regular at this bar, ordering Daiquiris from Constantino Ribalaigua Vert. Contrary to his doctors’ opinion, Ernest Hemingway was convinced that he was suffering from diabetes and as a result avoided eating sugar. So Constantino offered him a sugar-free version, with twice as much rum as usual. This “Daiquirí Del Salvaje” quickly became the “Daiquirí a la Papa”, then the “Daiquirí Como Papa”. [8-146] [12-161] [12-173] [12-174] [13] [22-75] [22-76] Later, Antonio Meilan modified the recipe by adding grapefruit juice and calling this mixture the “Hemingway Special” or “Papa Doble.” [8-146][22-76] The recipe for the Papa Doble is as follows: 60 ml Cuban rum, 15 ml grapefruit juice, 10 ml maraschino, 5 ml lime juice. It is shaken and strained into a chilled guest glass. If you prepare it in a blender, double the amount of maraschino before adding about 300 ml of crushed ice. [8-147]

Even after Ernest Hemingway no longer stayed in the hotel, but in his house “La Finca Vigía”, he stayed at La Floridita. Sometimes he even brought thermos flasks and had Daiquiris poured into them. Ernest Hemingway referred to this as “viaticum”, the Latin term for travel provisions, or his “trago del camino”, his “sip for the road”. [8-147]

The Daiquiri and the USA

In 1909, the future Admiral Lucius W. Johnson met Jennings Cox in Daiquirí and was served a Daiquirí. He reported on the meeting in the Baltimore Sun in 1950 and wrote about Jennings Cox:- „He mixed in each glass a jigger of rum, the juice of half a lime, a teaspoonful of sugar. He then filled the glass with finely shaved ice and stirred it well. In that hot, humid weather the ice melted rapidly and the glass quickly became frosted. We were delighted with the drink.[12-172] [28] [29]

Back in the USA, Lucius Johnson introduced the Daiquiri at the Army Navy Club in Washington D.C., and soon the Daiquiri Lounge was opened there, which still exists today. He also introduced the Daiquiri in other places he visited, in Baltimore and San Francisco, but also in Honolulu, Guam and Manila. [29]
During Prohibition, Cuba was a popular destination among North Americans because you could legally drink alcoholic beverages there. [12-163 ff] At the latest during these times, the Daiquiri also became known and popular among North Americans.

The recipe

Jennings Cox: Original Daiquiri-Recipe.
Jennings Cox: Original Daiquiri-Recipe. [1]

In the library of the University of Miami there is a handwritten note on which Jennings Cox’s original recipe for a Daiquiri is said to be found. It comes from the document collection of Carmen Puig, and the library states that these documents “primarily document Puig’s family ties to Jennings Cox, Puig’s step-grandfather and the American credited with inventing the daiquiri cocktail. Cox was an engineer with Bethlehem Iron Works in charge of mines in Daiquirí, a town in Cuba’s southeast region. Cox reportedly invented the famous daiquiri cocktail in 1898 by mixing together white Bacardi rum, mineral water, sugar, lemon juice, and crushed ice. From this collection, selected photographs and the original daiquiri recipe are digitized and available online.[2]

Anistatia Miller and Jarred Brown comment on this find that the note in the upper right corner is strange because it says “Original Mr. Cox’s”. The Diffords Guide writes that this recipe comes from Jennings Cox’s personal diary. But if it came from his diary, one had to ask why there was a note in the top right-hand corner, on a piece of paper that was obviously an index card. Simon Difford also stated that Jennings Cox’s granddaughter told a different version of the story. According to this version, Jennings Cox had no more gin when he had Americans as guests. He didn’t want to serve pure rum, so he added lime and sugar. However, from his obituary it appears that only his father and his wife were alive when he died. [3-135] [3-136] [3-137]

But let us leave these discrepancies aside. The provenance of the recipe can only lead to the conclusion that it is trustworthy, regardless of whether it is written on a diary page or on an index card, and regardless of whether it was written down by Jennings Cox himself or by a family member.

The recipe is:

“Daiquiri” for 6 persons –
The juice of 6 lemons
6 teaspoonsful of sugar
6 Bacardi cups – “Carta Blanca
2 small cups of Mineral Water
Plenty crushed ice –
Put all ingredients in a cocktail
shaker – and shake well –
Do not strain as the glass may
be served with some ice –[1]

This is supposed to be a Daiquiri? It is very different from the recipes commonly used today. For example, this is from the Cocktailian: “6 cl white rum, 3 cl lime juice, 2 cl sugar syrup (2:1). Put all the ingredients in a shaker, fill it with ice cubes and shake vigorously for 10 to 15 seconds (10 to 15 times). Strain into the pre-chilled guest glass.[17-189]

But that’s how it is, the Daiquiri, as it is understood today, calls itself a Daiquiri, but strictly speaking it is not one at all. It is rather a Cuban Rum Sour. In comparison, it is made with far too much acid and is not served on ice. The original, on the other hand, is a classic Rum Punch, served with ice. For a better understanding, let’s go into the individual ingredients of the original recipe.

Citrus juice

It is stated that lemons should be used. However, this must be a translation error or the linguistic usage of the time. We have already pointed out that limes were often called lemons in the English translation. This is also how David Embury describes it: “If you acquire a cocktail recipe book from any of the bars in Cuba, whatch out for their translation of the word “limon” (lee-moan’), which means both lime and lemon. This is almost invariably incorrectly translated into English as “lemon”. Sometimes the author specifies “limon verde” to avoid this confusion but the tanslator is likely to render this as “green lemon” or even “unripe lemon.” Actually lemons are almost unknown in Cuba, whereas lime trees grow in everyone’s own yard.[23-118]

Moreover, a taste test shows that it can only be limes. Lime juice harmonises better with a light Cuban rum than with lemon juice. The rum has nothing to offer against the latter. A Rum Sour, for example, made with a strong Demerara rum, benefits from the distinctive aroma of the lemon juice; lime juice is too weak here to counterbalance the rum.

Of course, one can argue about how big Jennings Cox’s limes were. But let us assume an average of 30 ml of juice per lime, as postulated by Jeffrey Morgenthaler. [26-17] This results in 180 ml of lime juice.

Sugar

It is noticeable that surprisingly little sugar is added in the recipe. Should we conclude from this that a Daiquiri should be prepared sour? We don’t think so, because if the acidity of the lime juice is not balanced by sufficient sweetness, the drink becomes unbalanced. The low sugar content, we suspect, is due to the fact that Jennings Cox was able to use ripe fruit with a higher sugar content in Cuba. He was able to harvest them ripe from the tree; what we can acquire cannot be harvested ripe because it is not transportable that way.

George Cheyne: An essay of health and long life. 1724, page 56, 57, 59.
George Cheyne: An essay of health and long life. 1724, page 56, 57, 59. [25-56] [25-57] [25-59]

As proof of this truism, let us take Dr. George Cheyne, whom we already quoted in our contribution to Punch. He wrote in 1724: “And if we consider, that a Lemon or Orange could never be transported half Seas over to us, without rotting or spoiling, if gathered when wholly ripe, we should have no great Opinion of their Juices. Every Spanish or Portugal Merchant can inform us, that they must be gathered green, or at least a Month before they are ripe, else they are not fit to be sent beyond the Seas.[25-56] [25-57] [25-59]

Jennings Cox uses 6 teaspoons of sugar; if you want to achieve a balanced sweet and sour ratio, you must use about 120 ml of sugar syrup (2:1) for 180 ml of lime juice.

Rum

When it comes to rum, the indication seems clear: according to the original recipe, a Bacardi Carta Blanca is to be used. This was ubiquitous at the time and can be considered an example of a light Cuban rum. A Daiquiri must be prepared with such a rum to be a Daiquiri. Otherwise it is simply a Rum Sour or a Rum Punch. Only white Cuban rum that has not been barrel-aged for too long makes a Daiquiri a Daiquiri.

Should it therefore be prepared preferably or exclusively with Bacardi rum? Everyone must answer this question for themselves. Ultimately, it is a question of personal taste. It must also be said that Bacardi rum must have been very different in the past from the products offered today. Wayne Curtis, author of the book “And a Bottle of Rum”, is quoted as proof of this statement. He tells of a meeting with Stephen Remsberg. As they talk about the different types of rum and taste appropriate samples,”He returns to his shelf and pulls down a bottle of white rum … .”This doesn’t look like much.” he says. He’s right; it doesn’t. It’s a bottle of white Bacardi dating from 1925, straight out of the crypt of Prohibition. I wrinkle my nose slightly – I find most white Bacardi harsh and industrial tasting, and I drink it only when nothing else is available. Remsberg notices and smiles. “You should really taste this,” he says to me. “This would have been the old Bacardi White Label they used to make the first daiquiris in Havana. This would have been aged four years, then they would have stripped the color out of it by filtering it through charcoal. I don’t have limes or I would make you Constantino’s El Floridita daiquiri. But you can say this is what started the daiquiri – this rum.” He pours out a bit more than a thimbleful into a glass, and I bring it under my nose. It’s not in the least medicinal, but complex and inviting.I sip. My word. It’s like tasting in Technicolor – it’s full, complex, and not too flowery, but also lacking any trace of unpleasant heaviness. It’s unlike any other white rum I’ve tasted. Rensberg was grinning at my inability to hide my shock. “So you can see why Prohibition-starved Americans flooding El Floridita would have said, ‘This is good!’ There was something about those early Cuban cocktail rums. They were just better rums than the world had seen. Nobody is producing a white rum today as pleasing as this.[12-238]

And so Wayne Curtis also advises: “Here’s my advice: don’t use a thin, cheap rum like Bacardi white — a spirit that’s a mere shadow of what it once was. Yes, this would have been the original rum in El Presidente — Bacardi was omnipresent in Havana during Prohibition — but the company has lost either the will or the way to make an exceptional rum. I’ve sipped Bacardi white that was distilled in 1925, and, my friend, I’m here to tell you that the Bacardi of today does not even live in the same neighborhood. If you can get some of Prichard’s white rum, made in Tennessee, I’d use that instead. Otherwise, substitute a decent aged rum, even if it’s dark.[14]

We feel the same way as Wayne Curtis, even though we haven’t tried the Prohibition Bacardi yet, of course, which is why we opted for another Cuban rum. Whether a Tennessee rum is a suitable substitute remains to be seen. From our point of view, a Daiquiri should be made with a tasty rum that has been aged for around four years and then filtered.

A cup is an Anglo-American measure of space, and a US cup holds 236 ml. [27] Thus Jennings Cox used 1416 ml of Bacardi Carta Blanca.

Water

A very essential element of the original recipe is the water. Not only is additional water added before shaking, but the shaken mixture is added to the glass along with the ice. Not only the small amount of lime juice used, but also the additional water shows us that the Daiquiri is to be understood as a Punch, not a Sour.

Jennings Cox used “2 small cups”, i.e. a little less than 472 ml of water.

Ice

Jennings Cox states that you should put plenty of crushed ice in the shaker, then shake everything thoroughly, and then pour the contents of the shaker, including ice, into a glass. This also shows us that we are looking at an iced Punch, not a Sour.

Conclusio

Daiquiri Punch.
Daiquiri Punch.

So if we reduce the original recipe to 70 ml rum, we get as approximate amount for the remaining ingredients: 8.9 ml lime juice, 5.9 ml sugar syrup (2:1), a little less than 23 ml water. This mixture should be shaken with plenty of crushed ice.

We don’t usually have crushed ice available, so we started a small series of experiments to work out how to prepare a pleasant-tasting Punch without it, without having to forego sufficient dilution by melted water or cooling by ice in the glass. Our suggestion is:

Daiquiri Punch.
Daiquiri Punch.

70 ml Eminente 3-year-old rum
10 ml lime juice
6.25 ml sugar syrup (2:1)
40 ml water
Shaken. Serve in a Collins glass with ice cubes.

Interestingly, this ratio, which we found after a lot of trial and error, is pretty much the same as our recipe for a “Daiquiri Sour”, with the difference that some of the lime juice and sugar syrup have been replaced by water:

70 ml Eminente 3-year-old rum
30 ml lime juice
20 ml sugar syrup (2:1)
Shaken.

It therefore seems to us that the original Daiquiri was soon changed by increasing its acidity and dispensing with serving it with ice, thus turning a Punch into a Sour. It is not surprising that the two recipes are so closely related, since the Sour, as we explained in our article on the origins of the Sour, is nothing other than a Punch with a high citrus juice content.

But there is one big difference: you don’t want to drink too many glasses of a Daiquiri Sour in a row, because the large amount of lime juice quickly makes you want something else. If you prepare a Daiquiri Punch, however, you can drink loads of it in a row. It has very little acidity and is incredibly refreshing, similar to a Collins, which is nothing other than a Punch.

Historical recipes in analysis

We have not yet analysed in detail the Daiquiri recipes that have been handed down in bar books. This is not necessary because the sources are so good. It is clear how a Daiquiri is commonly prepared today, namely as a Sour. Equally clear is the recipe handed down by Jennings Cox, which corresponds to a Punch.

Nevertheless, a brief look at the books is in order. What is there in them that is worth mentioning? First of all, although it seems obvious, the first printed recipe called Daiquiri that we could find in a book comes from a Cuban book, John B. Escalante’s “manual del cantinero” from 1915. This one, however, is already a variation of the original, because it omits additional water and also adds curaçao and grenadine syrup.

Occasionally, a Daiquiri Cocktail is also prepared with Grenadine syrup – as for example with Harry McElhone in 1926. But then it is what is commonly called a Bacardi Cocktail. This is one of the few legally protected cocktails. In 1936, Bacardi led a court case to establish that a Bacardi Cocktail must always be made with Bacardi rum. [30]

As always, there are exceptions, and so you will also find recipes that are called Bacardi Cocktail but are sweetened with sugar syrup – and thus correspond to a Daiquiri. Then there is also the Cuban Cocktail, which sometimes corresponds to a Daiquiri, but is sometimes something else. We have therefore included both the Bacardi Cocktail and the Cuban Cocktail in the recipe collection in the appendix for the interested reader.

The Daiquiri met a similar fate as the Martini. Numerous mixed drinks emerged that basically no longer had much in common with a Dauquiri except for the name. This trend already began in the early 1970s. An example is Trader Vic, who gives the recipes for Anejo Daiquiri, Banaquiri, Mint Daiquiri, Peach Daiquiri, Jamaica Daiquiri, Lichee Nut Daiquiri, Mango Daiquiri, Mister Nephew’s Daiquiri, Orange Daiquiri, Passion Daiquiri, Royal Daiquiri and Trader Vic Daiquiri.

Sources
  1. https://merrick.library.miami.edu/cdm/singleitem/collection/chc0484/id/147/rec/4 Original Daiquiri recipe by Mr. Cox.
  2. https://merrick.library.miami.edu/cubanHeritage/chc0484/ Carmen Puig Papers.
  3. Anistatia Miller & Jarred Brown: Cuban Cocktails. ISBN 078-1-907434-10-5. 2012.
  4. Hilario Alonso Sanchez: El Arte del Cantinero o lis vinos y los licores. La Habana, P. Fernandez y cia., 1948.
  5. https://dict.leo.org/spanisch-deutsch/limette Limette.
  6. Charles H. Baker, Jr.: The Gentleman’s Companion, Volume II. Being an Exotic Drink Book or, Around the World With a Jigger, Beaker and Flask. Including: A personally collected Regiment of World-Famous Lively Liquid Masterpieces from Greater & Lesser Ports of Orient & Occident, & the South Seas. Not Forgetting: The Proper & Civilized Service of Beverages with Foods, together with Proven Formulae for Home Construction of Certain Bitters, Wines, Meads & Cordials; a Meaty Kernel of Advice for Those Departing for the Bars, & in the Last a Sextet of Temperance Delights, & a Platoon of Picker-Uppers of Proven Worth & Discretion. New York, The Derrydale Press, 1939.
  7. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Daiquir%C3%AD Daiquirí.
  8. Anistatia Miller & Jarred Brown: Cuba. The Legend of Rum. ISBN 0-9760937-8-2. Havana Club Collection, Mixellany Books. 2009.
  9. Anonymus: Bar La Floridita. Habana, ohne Jahr (1937).
  10. https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045462/1940-12-10/ed-1/seq-24/#date1=1789&sort=date&date2=1963&searchType=advanced&language=&sequence=0&index=0&words=Blender+Waring&proxdistance=5&rows=20&ortext=&proxtext=&phrasetext=waring+blender&andtext=&dateFilterType=yearRange&page=1 Evening Star. 10. December 1940, page B-6.
  11. https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Datei:Statue_of_Hemingway_at_Floridita_2016.jpg Image from the interior of the Floridita bar, in Havana, Cuba. Statue of Ernest Hemingway by Cuban artist José Villa Soberó.
  12. Wayne Curtis: And a bottle of rum. A history of the new world in ten cocktails. ISBN 978-0-307-33862-4. 2006.
  13. https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ernest_Hemingway#21_Jahre_auf_Kuba Ernest Hemingway. 21 Jahre auf Kuba.
  14. http://lostmag.matthewbrian.com/issue6/elpresidente.php Wayne Curtis: El Presidente. Mai 2006.
  15. https://www.fultonhistory.com/Newspapers%2021/Buffalo%20NY%20Evening%20News/Buffalo%20NY%20Evening%20News%201899/Buffalo%20NY%20Evening%20News%201899%20-%204777.pdf#xml=https://www.fultonhistory.com/dtSearch/dtisapi6.dll?cmd=getpdfhits&u=ffffffffe107814d&DocId=440808&Index=Z%3a%5cDISK%20V&HitCount=6&hits=11b3+11b4+11b5+11b6+11b7+11b8+&SearchForm=%2fFulton%5fform%2ehtml&.pdf Buffalo Evening News. 26. July 1899, Seite 2.
  16. https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045462/1898-06-18/ed-1/seq-23/#date1=1789&sort=date&date2=1963&searchType=advanced&language=&sequence=0&index=0&words=around+country+houses+infested+Santiago&proxdistance=5&rows=20&ortext=&proxtext=&phrasetext=The+country+houses+around+Santiago+are+infested&andtext=&dateFilterType=yearRange&page=1 Evening Star. 18. June 1898, page 23.
  17. Helmut Adam, Jens Hasenbein, Bastian Heuser: Cocktailian 2. Rum und Cachaça. ISBN 978-3-941641-46-4. 2011.
  18. https://merrick.library.miami.edu/cdm/singleitem/collection/chc0484/id/0/rec/5 Jennings Cox.
  19. https://www.elchago.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/D91D59CD-C02E-4A76-963D-112B618A5FFB.jpeg Gran Hotel “Venus”, Santiago de Cuba. Bar, Café y Barbería.
  20. https://www.elchago.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/11/292B0EB4-2BC5-4B18-A0DF-AAC65A6C677D-1024×646.jpeg Cathedral & Hotel Venus.
  21. https://oncubanews.com/cuba/constante-ribalaigua-el-rey-espanol-del-daiquiri-a-la-gran-pantalla/ Atahualpa Amerise: Constante Ribalaigua: el rey español del daiquirí a l agran pantalla. Therein the photo https://oncubanews.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/11/constante_daiquiri-750×536.jpg Constante Ribalaigua preparando su célebre daiquirí en El Floridita. Foto: Havana Club.
  22. Philip Greene: To Have and Have Another. A Hemingway Cocktail Companion. ISBN 978-0-399-53764-6. 2012.
  23. David A. Embury: The Fine Art of Mixing Drinks. London, Faber And Faber Limited, 1953.
  24. Basil Woon: When it’s Cocktail Time in Cuba. New York, 1928.
  25. https://archive.org/details/b30505161/page/54/mode/2up?q=punch George Cheyne: An essay of health and long life. London, 1724.
  26. Jeffrey Morgenthaler: The Bar Book. ISBN 978-1-4521-1384-5. 2014.
  27. https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cup_(Raumma%C3%9F) Cup (Raummaß).
  28. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jennings_Cox Jennings Cox.
  29. https://archive.org/details/TheGrog-Vol6Number2-Spring2011/page/n21/mode/2up?q=%22he+mixed+in+each+glass%22 The Grog. A Journal of Navy Medical History and Culture. Vol. 6 No. 2, Frühjahr 2011.
  30. https://www.diffordsguide.com/cocktails/recipe/143/bacardi-cocktail Bacardi Cocktail.
  31. Gerardo Corrales: Club de Cantineros de la Republica de Cuba. Manual Oficial. La Habana, 1930.
Daiquiri.
Daiquiri.

Historische Rezepte

1915 John B. Escalante: Manual del cantinero. Seite 15. Daiquiri Cocktail.

(Daiquiri cockteil)
USE LA GINCOTELERA
Echese la necesaria cantidad de hielo gordo para me-
diarla, y agréguese:
Limón verde exprimido . . . . . . Uno.
Azúcar en polvo . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 cucharada.
Jarabe de granadina . . . . . . . . 1 cucharada.
Curaçao . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 cucharada.
Ron Bacardi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 copita.
Agítese bien hasta que esté bien frappé, cuélese en
una copa de las de champán, y sírvase.

1917 Jacob A. Didier: The Reminder. Seite 159. Cost Line Cocktail.

Use mixing glass.
1/2 lime (juice).
1 teaspoon sugar.
1 drink Cuban rum.
1/2 glass cracked ice.
Shake, strain and serve.

1920 Anonymus: Gooderham & Worts Limited. Seite 8. Bacardi Cocktail.

In a shaker use:
1/3 Hyde Park London
Dry Gin
2/3 Bacardi Rum
1 teaspoonful Grenadine
Juice of half a lime
Add ice and agitate
slowly.

1922 Robert Vermeire: Cocktails. Seite 25. Daiquiri.

Daïquiri is the well-known iron mine
situated in the southern part of Cuba. The
Daïquiri Cocktail is well nown in Cuba and
the Southern States of the U.S.A.
Fill the shaker half full of broken ice
and add:
2/6 gill of Bacardi.
1/6 gill of fresh Lime Juice.
Sweeten with Grenadine.
Shake well and strain into a cocktail-glass.

1924 Carlo Beltramo: Les cocktails t les boissons américaines. Seite 26. Daiquiri cocktail.

Ce cocktail, très populaire dans les mines
de fer de Cuba, est aussi très connu dans les
Etats du sud de l’Amérique.
Se prépare dans le grand gobelet a moitié
rempli de glace en morceaux: 2/6 dl. de ba-
cardi (alcool de canne à sucre), le Jus d un
demi citron, adoucir avec un verre a liqueur
de sirop de grenadine. — Bien remuer et ser-
vir dans un verre à cocktail.

1924 León Pujol & Oscar Muñez: Manual del cantinero. Seite 14. Daiquiri.

1 Vasito de ron bacardí.
1/2 Cucharadita de granadina.
1/2 Cucharadita Jugo limón.
112 l ucLaradita .fugo limón.
Bien batido, en copa de Clover.

1924 León Pujol & Oscar Muñez: Manual del cantinero. Seite 14. Daiquiri seco.

Lo mismo que el anterior, poniéndole en vez de granadina
1(2 cucharadita de azúcar.

1925 Anonymus: About Town Cocktail Book. Seite 11. Daiquiri.

Daiquiri is the well-known iron mine situated in the southern
part of Cuba. The Daiquiri Cocktail is well known in Cuba
and the Southern States of the U.S.A.
Fill the shaker half full of broken ice and add:
2-6 gill of Bacardi
1-6 gill of fresh Lime Juice
Sweeten with Grenadine
Shake well and strain into a cocktail glass.

1925 „Robert“ Buckby & George Stone: The Buckstone Book of Cocktails. Seite 20. Daiqueri Cocktail.

2/3 Bacardi Rum, 1/6 orange juice, 1/6 lemon
juice, 1/2-teaspoonful sugar.
Shake and strain.

1926 Anonymus: The Cocktail Book. Seite 31. Bacardi Rum Cocktail.

Use Shaker
ONE teaspoon sugar; one portion Bacardi
rum; half portion orange juice; half
portion lemon juice. Fill with ice, shake
until very cold, and strain into a cocktail
glass.

1926 Anonymus: The Cocktail Book. Seite 31. Bacardi Rum Cocktail – Dry.

Use Shaker
ONE dash grenadine; one portion Bacardi
rum; one portion lemon juice. Fill
with ice, shake until very cold, and strain
into a cocktail glass.

1926 Anonymus: The Cocktail Book. Seite 31. Daiquiri Cocktail.

Use Shaker
ONE portion grenadine syrup, three por-
tions Bacardi rum, juice of one lime.
Shake well, and strain into a cocktail glass.

1926 Harry McElhone: Harry’s ABC of Mixing Cocktails. Seite 35. Dacqueri Cocktail.

2/3 Bacardi, Juice of a Fresh Lime, 1/6 Grenadine.
Shake well, and strain into cocktail glass.
(This was a very popular cocktail in America
before Prohibition came in. Bacardi is made in
Cuba.)

1927 Anonymus: El arte de hacer un cocktail. Seite 25. Daiquiri.

3 partes de ron.
Jugo de 1/2 limón.
Cucharadita de azúcar.
Bátase y sírvase.

1927 Anonymus: El arte de hacer un cocktail. Seite 25. Daiquiri Dulce.

1/2 de ron.
1/2 jugo de limón.
Un poco de granadina.
Bátase y sírvase.

1927 Anonymus: The Cocktail Book. Seite 31. Bacardi Rum Cocktail.

Use Shaker
ONE teaspoon sugar; one portion Bacardi
rum; half portion orange juice; half
portion lemon juice. Fill with ice, shake
until very cold, and strain into a cocktail
glass.

1927 Anonymus: The Cocktail Book. Seite 31. Bacardi Rum Cocktail – Dry.

Use Shaker
ONE dash grenadine; one portion Bacardi
rum; one portion lemon juice. Fill
with ice, shake until very cold, and strain
into a cocktail glass.

1927 Anonymus: The Cocktail Book. Seite 31. Daiquiri Cocktail.

Use Shaker
ONE portion grenadine syrup, three por-
tions Bacardi rum, juice of one lime.
Shake well, and strain into a cocktail glass.

1927 Nina Toye & A. H. Adair: Petits & grands verres. Seite 41. Le Daiquiri. Daiquiri Cocktail.

Remplir le gobelet à moitié de glace pilée. Y verser
le jus de trois citrons, une cuillerée de grenadine et trois
pleins verres de rhum Bacardi. Frapper fortement.

1927 Pedro Chicote: El bar americano en España. Seite 56. Daiquiri-Cocktail.

Prepárese en cocktelera:
3 ó 4 pedacitos de hielo picado.
2 cucharadas de las de café de jugo de limón.
10 gotas de granadina.
Termínese de llenar de ron Bacardi.
Agítese muy bien y sírvase en copa de cocktail.

1929 Adolphe Torelli: American Drinks Dictionary. Seite 24. Baccardy Cocktail.

Dans un shaker avec
de la glace pilée, une cuillère à café de grena –
dine, le jus d’un demi-citron, un demi-verre à
madère de Rhum Baccardy, agiter, passer dans
un verre à cocktail, garnir d’un zeste de citron.
Chalumeaux.

1929 Anonymus: Life and Letters of Henry William Thomas. Seite 35. Bacardi.

(Floyd Waggaman.) Proportions — one-half Bacardi rum and
one-half lemon juice. The latter had to be prepared with about
one-half by bulk of granulated sugar and water to make a sweet lemon
syrup. They had to be shaken very cold indeed. (Oh, you Mandy!)

1929 Anonymus: Life and Letters of Henry William Thomas. Seite 35. Bacardi.

(Col. Whitted.) Proportions — one-fourth gin, one-fourth Ba­-
cardi rum, one-fourth grapefruit juice, one-fourth orange juice, maple
syrup to sweeten. A table glass of syrup should sweeten about sixteen
cocktails.

1929 Anonymus: Life and Letters of Henry William Thomas. Seite 35. Bacardi.

Just Bacardi rum with the juice of one lime and a bar-spoon of
sugar.

1929 Anonymus: Life and Letters of Henry William Thomas. Seite 36. Daiquiri.

Just Bacardi rum with the juice of one lime and a dash of
Grenadine were used but it was well shaken.

1929 Frank Shay: Drawn form the Wood. Seite 181. Daiquiri.

Equal parts Rum Bacardi and Lime Juice
One teaspoonful powdered sugar

1929 Frank Shay: Drawn form the Wood. Seite 182. Bacardi Cocktail.

First of all make certain it is Bacardi that you are using
One and one half parts Bacardi
Jigger of Grenadine
Juice of half a lime
Ice, shake and strain into cocktail glass

1929 Juan A. Laser: Libro de cocktail. The Cocktail Book. Seite 10. Daiquiri Cocktail.

Use la copa fría
El jugo de medio limón verde.
Una cucharadita de agua.
Una cucharada rasa de azúcar.
Disuélvase bien.
Una toma de Ron Carta Blanca.
Batalo en la cotelera con hielo menudito, hasta
que la cotelera quede congelada por fuera, cuélelo y
sírvalo en la copa de Cocktail fría.

1929 Juan A. Laser: Libro de cocktail. The Cocktail Book. Seite 36. Daiquiri Cocktail.

Usa a chilled glass
The juice of one half green lemon.
One teaspoonful of sugar.
One leaspoonful of water.
Dissolve well.
ne portion of Bacardi (Carta Blanca).
Shake in cocktail shaker with plenty
chipped ice until the shaker become congealed on
outside. Strain and serve in chilled cocktail glass.

(1930er) Count Benvenito Martini: Cocktail-ology. Bacardi Cocktail (Dry).

3 parts Bacardi
1 part Lemon or Lime juice
Shake well and serve in cocktail glass.
Bacardi — the reason we are in favor
of America retaining her influence in
Cuba!

(1930er) Count Benvenito Martini: Cocktail-ology. Bacardi Cocktail (Sweet).

1-2 Bacardi
1-4 Lemon or Lime juice
1-4 Grenadine
Shake well and serve in cocktail glass.
What a boob Machado was, to leave a
country where such drinks can be had!

(1930er) Count Benvenito Martini: Cocktail-ology. Daiquiri Cocktail.

1 glass Rum
1-4 Lemon or Lime juice
1-4 Pineapple juice
1 teaspoonful powdered
sugar
Shake well, and strain into cocktail
glass. Sloppy Joe, who originated this,
is about to be given the whole island
of Cuba as his reward! He derserves it!

1930 Anonymus: Cocktails by „Jimmy“. Seite 33. Daiquiri.

2 parts Bacardi Rum
1 part Lime Juice
Grenadine to taste.

1930 Edgar Baudoin: Les Meilleurs Cocktails. Seite 13. Bacardi Cocktail.

1/6 Grenadine, le jus d’un citron, 2/3 Bacardi rum.

1930 Gerardo Corrales: Club de cantineros. Seite 35. Daiquiri Cocktail.

Cucharadita de azúcar.
Jugo de un limón.
Vasito de ron.
Bátase con hielo fino. Cuélese.

1930 Gerardo Corrales: Club de cantineros. Seite 35. Daiquiri Frapé Cocktail.

Jugo de 1/2 limón.
Cucharada de azúcar.
Cucharadita de marraschino.
Vasito de ron.
Póngase frapé en cotelera eléctrica.
Cuélese y sírvase.

1930 Harry Craddock: The Savoy Cocktail Book. Seite 54. Daiquiri Cocktail.

The Juice of 1/4 Lemon or
1/2 Lime.
1 Teaspoonful Powdered
Sugar.
1 Glass Bacardi Rum.
Shake well and strain into
cocktail glass.

“The moment had arrived for a Daiquiri. It was
a delicate compound; it elevated my contentment
to an even higher pitch. Unquestionably the
cocktail on my table was a dangerous agent, for it
held in its shallow glass bowl slightly encrusted
with undissolved sugar the power of a contemp
tuous indifference to fate; it set the mind free of
responsibility; obliterating both memory and to­-
morrow, it gave the heart an adventitious feeling of
superiority and momentarily vanquished all the
celebrated, the eternal fears. Yes, that was the
danger of skilfully prepared intoxicating drinks
. . . The word ‘ intoxicating’ adequately
expressed their power, their menace to orderly,
monotonous resignation. A word, I thought
further, debased by moralists from its primary
ecstatic content . . . but then, with a fresh
Daiquiri and a sprig of orange blossom in my
button-hole, it meant less than nothing.”
A short extract from Joseph Hergesheimer’s “San
Cristobal de la Habana,” which contains much
wisdom concerning Drinks, Cigars and the Art of
Fine Living.
(Quoted by kind permission of the publishers, Messrs. William Heineman
Ltd., and Messrs. Alfred A. Knopf, Inc.)

1930 Harry McElhone: Harry’s ABC of Mixing Cocktails. Seite 34. Cuban Cocktail.

2/3 Brandy, 1/3 Apricot Brandy, Juice of half a
Lime.

1930 Harry McElhone: Harry’s ABC of Mixing Cocktails. Seite 35. Dacqueri Cocktail.

2/3 Bacardi, Juice of a Fresh Lime, 1/6 Grenadine.
Shake well, and strain into cocktail glass.
(This was a very popular cocktail in America
before Prohibition came in. Bacardi is made in
Cuba.)

1930 Harry McElhone: Harry’s ABC of Mixing Cocktails. Seite 23. Bacardi Cocktail.

1 teaspoonful Grenadine,1/3 Gin, 2/3 Bacardi Rum,
juice of half a lime.
(Bacardi Rum comes from Cuba.)

1930 Knut W. Sundin: Two Hundred Selected Drinks. Seite 18. Daiquiri Cocktail.

Fill the shaker half full of broken ice and add:
2/3 of Bacardi
The juice of a fresh lime
Sweeten with Grenadine.
Shake well and strain into a cocktad glass.

1930 Pedro Chicote: Le ley mojada. Seite 103. Bacardi-Cocktail.

Prepárese en cocktelera:
3 ó 4 pedacitos de hielo.
1 cucharada de las de café de azúcar.
2 cucharadas de las de café de jugo de limón, y el
resto de ron Bacardi.
Sírvase en copa de cocktail, con una corteza de
limón.

1930 Pedro Chicote: Le ley mojada. Seite 133. Cubano-Cocktail.

Prepárese en cocktelera:
Hielo picado.
El jugo de medio limón.
1/3 de gin.
1/3 de coñac.
1/3 de Apricot brandy.
Agítese muy bien y sírvase
en copa de cocktail, añadien
do una guinda.

Pedro Chicote: Le ley mojada. 1920, page 133 . Cubano-Cocktail.
Pedro Chicote: Le ley mojada. 1920, page 133. Cubano-Cocktail.

1930 Pedro Chicote: Le ley mojada. Seite 134. Daiquiri-Cocktail.

Prepárese en cocktelera:
Unos pedacitos de hielo.
1 cucharada de las de café de jugo de limón.
3/4 de copita de ron Bacardí.
Agítese y sírvase en copa de cocktail. Este cock-
tail, en la Habana, suelen poner una cucharada de
granadina y servirlo en vaso grande, terminándole
de llenar de sifón.

1930 William T. Boothby: „Cocktail Bill“ Boothby’s World Drinks. Seite 33. Daiquiri.

Bacardi . . . . . . . . . . 3/4 jigger Grenadine . . . . . . . . . 1 spoon
. Lemon . . . . . . . . . . . 1 spoon
Shake well with ice, strain into chilled cocktail glass and serve.

1930 William T. Boothby: „Cocktail Bill“ Boothby’s World Drinks. Seite 33. Daiquiri, No. 2.

Bacardi . . . . . . . . . . 1/3 jigger Lime . . . . . . . . . . 1/3 jigger
. Sugar Syrup . . . . . . . . . 2 spoons
Shake well with ice, strain into chilled cocktail glass and serve.

1931 Blanche Z. De Baralt: Cuban Cookery. Seite 121. Original Daiquiri Cocktail.

While the Guantanamo Naval Station
was being established, in the early days of
the Republic a group of officers were
initiated into the secret of a cocktail made
with the juice of green limes and Bacardi
rum. It was immediately named Daiquiri,
in honor of its birthplace; a little mining’
town nearby. The name is now famous.
One small glass Bacardi rum
One teaspoonful sugar
Juice of half a lime
Shake well with cracked ice
Serve in a very cold glass.

1931 John: „Happy Days!“. Seite 31. Bacardi Cocktail.

50 per cent Bacardi Rum
25 per cent M & R Italian Vermouth
25 per cent French Vermouth
Fill glass with broken ice. Stir, strain and serve.

1931 John: „Happy Days!“. Seite 43. Cuban Cocktail.

100 per cent Jamaica Rum
Juice of half an Orange
Three dashes of Gum Syrup.
Fill glass with cracked ice; stir, strain and serve.

1931 Virginia Elliott & Phil D. Stong: Shake ’em Up. Seite 41. Old-Fashioned Bacardi Cocktail.

Season one glass of Bacardi rum with the
juice of one lime and a teaspoon of sugar.

1932 Al Hirschfeld: Manhattan Oases. Seite 36. Bacardi Cocktail.

One teaspoonful grenadine, 1/3 gin,
2/3 Bacardi rum and the juice of
1/2 a lime.

1932 Anonymus: Sloppy Joe’s Cocktails Manual. Seite 10. Daiquiri.

1 Teaspoonful of sugar.
1 Part of Rum.
The juice of a Lemon.
Shake with cracked ice, and serve
in a Manhattan glass.

1932 Jimmy: The Green Cocktail Book. Seite 33. Daiquiri.

2 parts Bacardi Rum
1 part Lime Juice
Grenadine to taste.

1932 William C. Feery: Wet Drinks for Dry People. Seite 23. Daiquiri Cocktail.

1 1/2 ounces Bacardi rum.
1/2 ounce lime juice.
1 dash Grenadine.
1/2 teaspoon eggwhite.
Shake together and serve.
(This is primarily a Cuban
drink and, granted not easily
available.)

1933 A. E. P. Bird & William C. Turner: Cocktails. Seite 12. Daiquiri.

Bacardi (White Label), 4 parts Lime Juice, 2 parts
. Sugar, 1/2 part
Sbake well with ice, garnish with pickled onion; serve.
This famous cocktail originated with American Soldiers
in the War with Spain. Landing through the surf near
the village of Daiquiri, they made use of discarded sugar
kettles, picked their own limes in the neighborhood and
mixed them with native rum and sugar. Their Alger beef
and raw onion rations, washed down with this delectable
potation, made a pleasant prelude to tbe next day’s fight-
ing. This recipe serves 6.
The ideal canape with this drink is a tiny hard cracker
spread with crushed avocado and minced onion, garnished
with pimento.

1933 Anonymus: Bottoms Up! Cocktail Daiquiri.

1.— One Jigger of Bacardi
2.— One teaspoon of granulated sugar (level) or sugared syrup.
3.— The Juice of one-half green lime.
4.—Cracked ice. Shake-well. Serve frappe.

1933 Anonymus: Cocktail Parade. Seite 12. Daiquiri.

2 parts Bacardi
1 part juice fresh limes
1 tablespoon conf. sugar

1933 Anonymus: Cocktails. Their Kicks and Side-Kicks. Seite 12. Daiquiri.

Bacardi (White Label), 4 parts Lime Juice, 2 parts
. Sugar, 1/2 part
Shake well with ice, garnish with pickled onion; serve.
This famous cocktail originated with American Soldiers
in the War with Spain. Landing through the surf near
the village of Daiquiri, they made use of discarded sugar
kettles, picked their own limes in the neighborhood and
mixed them with native rum and sugar. Their Alger beef
and raw onion rations, washed down with this delectable
potation, made a pleasant prelude to tbe next day’s fight
ing. This recipe serves 6.
The ideal canape with this drink is a tiny hard cracker
spread with crushed avocado and minced onion, garnished
with pimento.

1933 Anonymus: Sloppy Joe’s Cocktails Manual. Seite 10. Daiquiri.

1 Teaspoonful of sugar.
1 Part of Rum.
The juice of a Lemon.
Shake with cracked ice, and serve
in a Manhattan glass.

1933 Anonymus: The Cocktail Book. Seite 31. Daiquiri Cocktail.

Use Shaker
ONE portion grenadine syrup, three por-
tions Bacardi rum, juice of one lime.
Shake well, and strain into a cocktail glass.

1933 George A. Lurie: Here’s How. Seite 5. Bacardi.

Bacardi . . . . . . 2/3 jigger Lime . . . . . . . 1 spoon
. Sugar Syrup . . . . . . . 1 spoon
Shake well with ice, strain into chilled cocktail glass and
serve.

Anmerkung: es gibt hier auch noch Bacardi No.2 bis Bacardi No. 5.

1933 George A. Lurie: Here’s How. Seite 27. Daiquiri.

Bacardi . . . . . . . 3/4 jigger Grenadine . . . . . . 1 spoon
. Lemon . . . . . . 1 spoon
Shake well with ice, strain into chilled cocktail glass and
serve.

1933 George A. Lurie: Here’s How. Seite 27. Daiquiri No. 2.

Bacardi . . . . . . . 1/3 jigger Lime . . . . . . . 1/3 jigger
. Sugar Syrup . . . . . . 2 spoons
Shake well with ice, strain into chilled cocktail glass and
serve.

1933 George A. Lurie: Here’s How. Seite 79. Tammany.

Bacardi . . . . . . . . . 2/3 jigger Lime . . . . . . . . . . . 1 spoon
. Sugar Syrup . . . . 1 spoon
Shake well with ice, strain into chilled cocktail glass and
serve.

1933 George Albert Zabriskie: The Bon Vivant’s Companion. Seite 7. Daiquiri.

1 jigger of Bacardi
Juice of 1/2 lime
Sugar to taste
Mix thoroughly and shake well in cracked ice.

1933 Harry Craddock: The Savoy Cocktail Book. Seite 53. Cuban Cocktail (No. 1.).

The Juice of 1/4 Lemon.
1 Teaspoonful
Powdered
Sugar.
1 Glass Bacardi Rum.
Shake well and strain into
cocktail glass.

1933 Harry Craddock: The Savoy Cocktail Book. Seite 53. Cuban Cocktail (No. 2.).

The Juice of 1/2 Lime or 1/4
Lemon.
1/3 Apricot Brandy.
2/3 Brandy.
Shake well and strain into
cocktail glass.

1933 Harry Craddock: The Savoy Cocktail Book. Seite 54. Daiquiri Cocktail.

The Juice of 1/4 Lemon or
1/2 Lime.
1 Teaspoonful
Powdered
Sugar.
1 Glass Bacardi Rum.
Shake well and strain into
cocktail glass.

1933 Harry Craddock: The Savoy Cocktail Book. Seite 282. Bacardi Cocktail.

1/4 Lemon Juice or Lime
Juice.
1/4 Grenadine.
1/2 Bacardi Rum.
Shake well and strain into cock­
tail glass.

1933 Harry Todd: Mixer’s Guide. Seite 22. Daiquiri (Dykaree).

Three-fourths London dry gin.
One-fourth Dykaree.
Juice one fresh lime or one-half lemon to each drink.
Shake with ice and serve.

1933 Jacob Abraham Grohusko: Jack’s Manual. Seite 60. Daiquiri Cocktail.

Juice of 1/4 lemon or 1/4 lime
1 teaspoonful powdered sugar
100 % Bacardi rum
Shake well, and strain into cocktail glass.

1933 Julien J. Proskauer: What’ll You Have. Seite 84. Dacqueri Cocktail.

5 parts Bacardi Rum
Juice of a Fresh Lime
1 part Grenadine

1933 Virginia Elliott: Quiet Drinking. Seite 51. Bacardi Cocktail No. 1.

Two parts Bacardi rum, one part lime juice, one
part orange juice and one part gin. Shake with shaved
ice until very cold.

1933 Virginia Elliott: Quiet Drinking. Seite 51. Bacardi Cocktail No. 2.

Two ponies of Bacardi, the juice of one lime, and
a dash of maraschino. Shake until cold.

1933 Virginia Elliott: Quiet Drinking. Seite 52. Bacardi Cocktail No. 3.

Four parts Bacardi, four parts lemon juice, four
parts orange juice, three parts gin, one part almond
syrup and a bar spoon of soft sugar. Half fill the
shaker with ice and shake until very cold.

1933 Virginia Elliott: Quiet Drinking. Seite 52. Army Cocktail.

One part Bacardi, one-quarter lemon juice and
one-quarter sugar syrup. Shake until very cold.

1933 Virginia Elliott: Quiet Drinking. Seite 59. Plain Bacardi Cocktail.

In a cocktail glass put the juice of one lime and
a scant bar spoon of soft sugar. Fill the glass with
Bacardi. Stir and serve.

1933 Virginia Elliott: Quiet Drinking. Seite 61. Cuban Cocktail.

Crush a few mint leaves in a cocktail glass. Add
one part gin, one part Italian vermouth, one part
French vermouth and three dashes of orange juice.
Stir.

1934 A. T. Neirath: Rund um die Bar. Seite 156. Bacardi-Cocktail.

Bacardi ist der Name eines
auf Cuba hergestellten Rum.
Gum nach Geschmack
1/3 Zitronensaft
1/4 Gin
1/2 Bacardi-Rum
Sch-.B. [Schüttelbecher] K. [Kirsche] Z. [Zitronenspirale]

1934 A. T. Neirath: Rund um die Bar. Seite 168. Cuban-Cocktail I.

Originalrezept der 1/8 Jam. Rum
Internationalen Barkeeper- 1/8 Grenadine
Union 1/4 Zitronensaft
Abteilung Düsseldorf 1/2 Amer “Dolfi”
. Sch-B. [Schüttelbecher] Z. [Zitronenspirale]
. in Sektschale servieren

1934 A. T. Neirath: Rund um die Bar. Seite 169. Cuban-Cocktail II.

. 1/4 Zitronensaft
. 1/4 Apricot Brandy
. 1/2 Weinbrand
. Sch-B. [Schüttelbecher]

1934 A. T. Neirath: Rund um die Bar. Seite 169. Dacqueri-Cocktail.

(sprich: däquiri)
In Amerika vor Einführung
des Alkoholverbots der be-
liebteste Cocktail
1/6 Grenadine
1/6 Zitronensaft
4/6 Bacardi-Rum
Sch-.B. [Schüttelbecher] K. [Kirsche] Z. [Zitronenspirale]

1934 Anonymus: 100 Famous Cocktails. Seite 26. Daiquiri.

One-third jigger Lime Juice
Two-thirds jigger Bacardi Rum
One bar-spoonful sugar
Shake well; strain; cocktail glass

1934 Anonymus: Bar La Florida. Daiquiri Num. 1.

2 Onzas Ron Bacardi. 2 Ounces Bacardi Rum.
1 Cucharadita de azucar 1 Teaspoonful Sugar.
Jugo de 1/2 limón verde juice of half a lemon.
Hielo menudito. Cracked ice.
Batase perfectamente y Shake well and strain into
cuelese. cocktail glass.

1934 Anonymus: Sloppy Joe’s Cocktails Manual. Seite 10. Daiquiri.

1 Teaspoonful of sugar.
1 Part of Rum.
The juice of a Lemon.
Shake with cracked ice, and serve
in a Manhattan glass.

1934 Anonymus: The Complete Bartender’s Guide. Seite 101. Daiquiri.

1/2 lime squeezed onto 1 teaspoonful sugar, pour 1 whisky glass
full of bacardi; plenty of ice; shake until shaker is thoroughly
frosted outside. Meanwhile chill a tall wine glass known as flute,
fill it with shaved ice, and pour in the mixture. Must be drunk
frozen. (Original Cuban recipe.)

1934 Bernard: 100 Cocktails. Seite 12. Bacardi Cocktail.

1/4 gill of Bacardi.
1/4 gill of Lime Juice.
2 dashes of Grenadine Syrup.
1 Cherry.
1/2 tumblerful of broken Ice.
Half fill the tumbler with broken ice and add
the Bacardi. Then add the Lime juice and
the Grenadine Syrup. Stir well and pass
through a strainer into a cocktail glass.
Serve with a cherry.
A very pleasant cocktail. This drink is very
popular in America.

1934 Bernard: 100 Cocktails. Seite 27. Daiquiri Cocktail.

1/3 gill of Lime Juice.
1 or 2 dashes of Grenadine.
1/6 gill of Rum.
1/2 shakerful of broken Ice.
Half fill the shaker with broken ice and add the
Lime juice. Then add the Rum and the
Grenadine. Shake well and pass through a
strainer into a cocktail glass.
This is quite a mild cocktail.

1934 G. F. Steele: My New Cocktail Book. Seite 42. Daiquiri.

50% Bacardi Rum
50% Pineapple juice
juice of one Lemon or
Lime
enough Gum syrup to
offset Lemon juice
small portion Absinthe

1934 Harry Jerrold Gordon: Gordon’s Cocktail and Food Recipes. Seite 56. Daiquiri Cocktail.

Bacardi Rum, 1 Glass
Powdered Sugar, 2 Teaspoonsful
Add juice of 1/2 Lemon or 1/2 Lime.
Ice.-25 Shakes. Strain and serve.
If desired to suit taste add 3 Dashes of
Grenadine.

1934 Harry McElhone: Harry’s ABC of Mixing Cocktails. Seite 25. Bacardi Cocktail.

1 teaspoonful Grenadine,1/3 Burrough’s Beefeater
Gin, 2/3 Bacardi Rum, Juice of half a Lime.
(Bacardi Rum comes from Cuba.)

1934 Harry McElhone: Harry’s ABC of Mixing Cocktails. Seite 41. Cuban Cocktail.

2/3 Brandy, 1/3 Apricot Brandy, Juice of half a
Lime.

1934 Harry McElhone: Harry’s ABC of Mixing Cocktails. Seite 43. Dacqueri Cocktail.

2/3 Bacardi, Juice of a Fresh Lime, 1/6 Grenadine.
Shake well, and strain into cocktail glass.
(This was a very popular cocktail in America
before Prohibition came in. Bacardi is made in
Cuba.)

1934 Irvin S. Cobb: Irvin S. Cobb’s Own Recipe Book. Seite 40. Daiquiri.

1 1/2 jiggers Cuban-type Rum, Juice of 1 Lime, 1/2 teaspoon Powdered
Sugar, a little Pineapple Juice. Shake well with cracked ice and strain into
saucer champagne glass filled with finely shaved ice. This is the recipe used
in the Florida Bar at Havana, Cuba. The third edition of this particular series
should be served with a wheelchair.

1934 Magnus Bredenbek: What Shall We Drink. Seite 15. Daiquiri.

HOW TO MIX A DAIQUIRI OR DYKAREE COCKTAIL
Shake in iced container three ounces dry gin, one ounce of
Dykaree, the juice of one lime or half a lemon, and one tea-
spoon of “gum.” After a vigorous mixiug, strain into cock-
tail glass. Some spell Dykaree, Daiquiri.

1934 Patrick Gavin Duffy: The Official Mixer’s Manual [collectic1806]. Seite 141. Bacardi Cocktail.

1 Drink Bacardi Rum
Juice of 1/2 Lime
2 Dashes Gum Syrup
Shake well with cracked ice and strain.
Use glass number 2

1934 Patrick Gavin Duffy: The Official Mixer’s Manual [collectic1806]. Seite 142. Cuban Cocktail.

1 Jigger Bacardi Rum
2 Dashes Gum Syrup
Juice of 1/2 Lime
Shake well with cracked ice and strain.
Use glass number 2

1934 Patrick Gavin Duffy: The Official Mixer’s Manual [collectic1806]. Seite 143. Cuban Cocktail No. 1.

Juice of 1/4 Lemon
1 Teaspoonful Powdered Sugar
1 Glass Bacardi Rum
Shake well and strain into glass.
Use glass number 2

1934 Patrick Gavin Duffy: The Official Mixer’s Manual [collectic1806]. Seite 143. Daiquiri Cocktail.

1 Jigger Bacardi Rum
2 Dashes Grenadine Syrup
Juice of 1 Lime
Shake well with cracked ice and strain.
Use glass number 2

1934 Tom & Jerry: How to Mix Drinks [collectiv1801]. Seite 97. Bacardi Cocktail.

2 ponies rum.
1 pony apricot brandy.
1 pony Grenadine.
Juice of 1 lime.
Frappe till icy cold. Serve in tall thin glass.

1934 Tom & Jerry: How to Mix Drinks [collectiv1801]. Seite 101. Daiquiri.

1/2 lime squeezed onto 1 teaspoonful sugar, pour 1 whisky glass
full of bacardi; plenty of ice; shake until shaker is thoroughly
frosted outside. Meanwhile chill a tall wine glass known as flute,
fill it with shaved ice, and pour in the mixture. Must be drunk
frozen. (Original Cuban recipe.)

1934 William T. Boothby: „Cocktail Bill“ Boothby’s World Drinks. Seite 33. Daiquiri.

Bacardi . . . . . . . . . . 3/4 jigger Grenadine . . . . . . . . . 1 spoon
. Lemon . . . . . . . . . . . 1 spoon
Shake well with ice, strain into chilled cocktail glass and serve.

1934 William T. Boothby: „Cocktail Bill“ Boothby’s World Drinks. Seite 33. Daiquiri, No. 2.

Bacardi . . . . . . . . . . 1/3 jigger Lime . . . . . . . . . . 1/3 jigger
. Sugar Syrup . . . . . . . . . 2 spoons
Shake well with ice, strain into chilled cocktail glass and serve.

1935 Adrian: Cocktail Fashions of 1936. Seite 40. Bacardi (sweet) Cocktail.

1/4 lemon or lime juice.
1/4 Grenadine.
1/2 rum.
Shake well and serve in cocktail glass.

1935 Adrian: Cocktail Fashions of 1936. Seite 40. Bacardi (dry) Cocktail.

1 part lemon or lime juice.
3 parts of rum.
Shake well and serve in cocktail glass.

1935 Adrian: Cocktail Fashions of 1936. Seite 44. Daiquiri Cocktail.

1/4 lemon or lime juice,
1/4 pineapple juice.
1 teaspoonful powdered sugar.
1 glass of Cuban rum.
Shake well, strain into cocktail glass.

1935 Adrian: Cocktail Fashions of 1936. Seite 95. Daiquiri Frappe.

Juice of 1/2 lemon.
Barspoon of sugar.
1 jigger rum.
Dash of maraschino.
Shake with very fine ice.
Serve in long narrow stem glass.

1935 Albert Stevens Crockett: The Old Waldorf-Astoria Bar Book. Daiquiri.

One part Bacardi
Juice of half a Lime
One barspoon powdered Sugar
Note: The order of adding ingredients is important.
Personal preference dictates serving the cocktail with
finely shaved ice in the glass.

1935 Anonymus: Bar la Florida Cocktails. Daiquiri Num. 1.

2 Onzas Ron Bacardi. 2 Ounces Bacardi Rum.
1 Cucharadita de azucar 1 Teaspoonful Sugar.
Jugo de 1/2 limón verde juice of half a lemon.
Hielo menudito. Cracked ice.
Batase perfectamente y Shake well and strain into
cuelese. cocktail glass.

1935 Anonymus: Fancy Drinks. Seite 13. Daiquiri Cocktail.

2/3 parts Cuban Rum
1/3 part Lime or Lemon Juice
Sweeten with Sugar or Grenadine
Shake well with Ice

1935 Anonymus: Sloppy Joes Cocktail Manual. Seite 10. Daiquiri.

1 Teaspoonful of sugar
1 Part of Rum.
The juice of a lime.
Shake with cracked ice, and serve
in manhattan glass.

1935 Anonymus: The Art of Mixing Drinks. Seite 51. Bacardi Cocktail.

1 Jigger Bacardi Rum
3 Dashes Grenadine
Juice of 1/2 lime

1935 Anonymus: The Art of Mixing Drinks. Seite 54. Daiquiri Cocktail.

Juice of 1/4 lemon or of 1/2 lime
1 Teaspoonful powdered sugar
1 Jigger Bacardi Rum

1935 George Pillaert: Le Bar Américan. Seite 21. Baccardi.

1/3 Dry Gordon’s Gin
2/3 Ron Baccardi
1/4 jus de citron
3 traits de grenadine Passer Shaker

1935 Gustav Selmer Fougner: Along the Wine Trail. Seite 209. The Bacardi.

Bacardi cocktails may be made either sweet or dry. The recipe for
the first is one part lemon or lime juice, one part Grenadine and two
parts Bacardi. The dry cocktail is made with one part lemon or lime
juice, three parts bacardi, and a small spoonful of suger.

1935 Gustav Selmer Fougner: Along the Wine Trail. Seite 210. The Daiquiri.

Jennings S. Cox, inventor of the famous Daiquiri, was strongly
opposed to calling the drink a “cocktail.” From long years spent in
Cuba, he held strongly to the theory that the wise traveler should, so
far as possible, confine himself to the food and drink native to the
country in which he chanced to be. And the Daiquiri, for that
reason was, in his opinion, the ideal Cuban drink.
Mr. Cox was meticulousness itself in the care which he
prepared the Daiquiri – “one of lime, two of sugar and three of
bacardi.” All the ingredients having been thoroughly mixed, the lime
juice and sugar separately, the fluid result was poured over finely
cracked ice packed in a champagne glass.

1935 John Held: Peychaud’s New Orleans Cocktails. Daiquiri.

1/2 Ounce Lemon or Lime Juice.
1 1/2 Ounces Cuban Rum.
2 Dashes Peychaud’s Bitters.
1/2 Teaspoonful Granulated
Sugar. Shake well and strain
into cocktail glass.

1935 Leo Cotton: Old Mr. Boston. Seite 11. Bacardi Cocktail.

1 Jigger Bacardi Rum
Juice of 1/2 Lime
2 Dashes Grenadine
Shake well with cracked ice and
strain into 3 oz. Cocktail glass.

1935 Leo Cotton: Old Mr. Boston. Seite 40. Cuban Cocktail No. 1.

1 Jigger Rum
2 Dashes Gum Syrup
Juice of 1/2 Lime
Shake well with cracked ice and
strain into 3 oz. Cocktail glass.

1935 Leo Cotton: Old Mr. Boston. Seite 41. Daiquiri Cocktail.

1 Jigger Rum
Juice of 1/4 Lemon or 1/2 Lime
1 Teaspoon Powdered Sugar
Shake well with cracked ice and
strain into 3oz. Cocktail glass.

1935 O. Blunier: The Barkeeper’s Golden Book. Seite 92. Daiquiri.

3/4 Bacardi
1/4 Lemon Juice
1 Barspoon Sugar

1936 Anonymus: Cocktails, Drinks and Snacks. Seite 36. Daiquiri Cocktail.

2 oz. Rum
2 teaspoons powdered sugar
Juice of one lemon
Juice of one lime
3 dashes Grenadine if desired
ice, 25 shakes, strain into cocktail glass.

1936 Anonymus: Sloppy Joes Cocktails Manual. Seite 10. Daiquiri.

1 Teaspoonful of sugar
1 Part of Rum.
The juice of a lime.
Shake with cracked ice, and serve
in manhattan glass.

1936 Bill Edwards: Drinks. Seite 24. Bacardi.

2 parts Bacardi Rum
1 part Dry Gin
1 part Lime Juice
Grenadine to taste.

1936 Bill Edwards: Drinks. Seite 34. Cuban.

1 part Apricot Brandy
2 parts Brandy
1 part Lime Juice.

1936 Bill Edwards: Drinks. Seite 34. Daiquiri.

2 parts Bacardi Rum
1 part Lime Juice
Sugar to taste.

1936 Elvezio Grassi: 1000 Misture. Seite 36. Daiquiri Cocktail.

(Serie Her-
gesheimer’s).
Agitare nel shaker con ghiaccio:
Succo di 1/4 di limone
Il succo di 1/2 lima
1 Cucchiaio zucchero in pol-
vere
Il resto di rhum Bacardi.
Servite.

1936 Frank A. Thomas: Wines, Cocktails and other Drinks. Seite 178. Bacardi Cocktail.

5 glasses Bacardi rum 5 teaspoons powdered sugar
. Juice of 2 lemons or 3 limes
One of the most famous and best of all rum cocktails.

1936 Frank A. Thomas: Wines, Cocktails and other Drinks. Seite 178. Daiquiri Cocktail.

4 glasses Cuban rum Juice of 4 lemons
. 4 teaspoons sugar
This is virtually the same as the Bacardi Cocktail and
can be made with fresh lime juice or fresh pineapple juice,
if desired. Sometimes the edge of the glass is rubbed with
lemon and dipped in powdered sugar to give it a frosted
appearance. (From the recipe of Sloppy Joe, of Havana.)

1936 Frank A. Thomas: Wines, Cocktails and other Drinks. Seite 190. Cuban Cocktail.

4 glasses brandy 2 glasses apricot liqueur
. Juice of 1 1/2 lemons or 3 limes

1936 Frank Meier: The Artistry of Mixing Drinks. Seite 29. Daiquiri.

In shaker: the juice of one-
half Lime or quarter Lemon,
one-half teaspoon o f Sugar,
one-half glass of Bacardi ; shake
well and serve.

1937 Anonymus: Bar la Florida Cocktails. Seite 24. Daiquiri Num. 1.

2 Onzas Ron “Martí”. 2 Ounces “Martí” Rum.
1 Cucharadita de azúcar 1 Teaspoonful Sugar.
El iugo de 1/2 limón verde Juice of 1/2 Lemon.
Hielo menudito. Cracked ice.
Bátase perfectamente y Shake well and strain into
cuélese. cocktail glass.

1937 Anonymus: Here’s How. Seite 22. Daiquiri.

2/3 Ron Bacardi
1/3 Lime Juice
Sweeten with Grenadine or
Powdered Sugar

1937 Anonymus: Hotel „Lincoln“ Cock-tail Book. Seite 22. Cuban Cocktail.

The juice of 1 lime.
1/3 dry gin.
1/3 brandy.
Shake well and serve.

1937 Anonymus: Hotel „Lincoln“ Cock-tail Book. Seite 24. Daiquiri Cocktail.

A teaspoonful of sugar.
The juice of a lime.
A jigger of YUCAYO rum.
Shake with fine ice, strain,
and serve.

1937 John R. Iverson: Liquid Gems. Seite 45. Daiquiri Cocktail.

Shaker—ice
1 oz. Bacardi Rum
1/2 Lime
oz. simple syrup
Shake, strain and serve in cocktail
glass.

Observations
This is the same as the Bacardi Cocktail, with
the simple syrup instead of Grenadine. Both
cocktails are much in demand.
May also be served in a flat champagne glass,
with a little shaved ice.

1937 R. de Fleury: 1800 – And All That. Seite 191. Daiquiri Frappe.

Juice of 1/2 Lemon
1 Barspoonful Sugar
3/4 Oz. Rum
1 Dash Maraschino
Shake with fine Ice
and serve in a long
narrow stem glass.

1937 Salvador Trullos Mateu: Recetario internacional de cock-tails. Seite 81. Bacardi Cock-Tail.

Cucharadita de azúcar.
Vasito de BACARDI.
Jugo de medio limón.
Bátase bien. Colar y servir.

1937 Salvador Trullos Mateu: Recetario internacional de cock-tails. Seite 93. Cuban Cock-Tail.

Jugo de un limón.
Tercera parte ginebra BOOTH ‘S.
Tercera parte coñac TRES COPAS.
Tercera parte apricot brandy. Bátase.

1937 Salvador Trullos Mateu: Recetario internacional de cock-tails. Seite 93. Daiquiri Cock-Tail.

Cucharadita de azúcar.
Jugo de un limón.
Vasito de BACARDI.
Bátase con hielo fino. Cuélese.

1937 Salvador Trullos Mateu: Recetario internacional de cock-tails. Seite 93. Daiquiri Frape Cock-Tail.

Jugo de medio limón.
Cucharada do azúcar.
Cucharadita de marraschino.
Vasito de BACARDI.
Póngase frapé en cootelera eléctrica.
Cuélese y sirvase.

1937 William J. Tarling: Café Royal Cocktail Book. Daiquiri.

3 dashes Gomme Syrup.
3/4 Daiquiri Rum.
1/4 Juice of a Lime or Lemon.
Shake.

1938 Anonymus: Cocktails. Seite 20. Daiquiri.

1 Jigger Cuban Rum
Juice of Half Lime
1 Teaspoon Sugar
Shake well

1938 Anonymus: Sloppy Joe’s Cocktail Manual. Seite 10. Daiquiri.

1 Teaspoonful of sugar
2 oz. of Rum.
The juice of a lime.
Shake with cracked ice, and serve
in manhattan glass.

1938 Bud Caroll: Popular Drinks of Today. Seite 8. Bacardi.

Bacardi . . . . . . . . 2/3 jigger Lime . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 spoon
. Grenadine syrup . . 1 spoon
Shake well with ice, strain into chilled cocktail glass
and serve.

1938 Bud Caroll: Popular Drinks of Today. Seite 8. Bacardi No. 2.

Bacardi . . . . . . . . 2/3 jigger Egg . . . . . . . . . . . . white
Raspberry syrup . 1 spoon Lime . . . . . . . . . . . 1 spoon
Shake well wtih ice, strain into chilled cocktail glass
and serve.

1938 Bud Caroll: Popular Drinks of Today. Seite 9. Bacardi, Dry.

Bacardi . . . . . . . . . 1/2 jigger Fr. Vermouth . . . . . 1/2 jigger
Stir well with ice, strain into chilled cocktail glass
and serve.

1938 Bud Caroll: Popular Drinks of Today. Seite 13. Cuban.

Bacardi . . . . . . . . . . 1 jigger Lime Juice . . . . . juice of 1/2
Shake well with ice, strain into chilled cocktail glass
and serve.

1938 Bud Caroll: Popular Drinks of Today. Seite 13. Daiquiri.

Rum . . . . . . . . . . . 1 jigger Lime . . . . . . . . juice of 1/2
. Sugar . . . . . . 1 spoon
Shake well. Stir into cocktail glass and you can pour
over a filled glass with fine ice.

1938 Hyman Gale & Gerald F. Marco: The How and When. Seite 93. Bacardi Cocktail – No. 1.

1 jigger Bacardi Rum
Juice of one Lime
1/2 teaspoon Sugar
1 dash Grenadine
Shake well
Serve in Cocktail Glass

1938 Hyman Gale & Gerald F. Marco: The How and When. Seite 93. Bacardi Cocktail – No. 2.

Juice of one Lime
1/2 spoon Sugar
1 jigger Bacardi
1 pony Pineapple Juice
Serve in Champagne Glass with
shaved ice

1938 Hyman Gale & Gerald F. Marco: The How and When. Seite 107. Cuban Cocktail – No. 1.

2/3 jigger Bacardi Rum
1/3 jigger Lime Juice
Shake well
Strain into Cocktail Glass

1938 Hyman Gale & Gerald F. Marco: The How and When. Seite 107. Cuban Cocktail – No. 2.

Juice of 1/2 Lime
1/3 Apricot Brandy
2/3 Bacardi Rum
Shake well
Strain into Cocktail Glass

1938 Hyman Gale & Gerald F. Marco: The How and When. Seite 108. Daiquiri Cocktail.

Juice of 1/2 Lime
1 teaspoon Powdered Sugar
1 jigger Cuban Rum — White
Shake well
Strain into Cocktail Glass

1938 Jean Lupoiu: Cocktails. Seite 57. Daiquiri.

Dans le shaker:
Le jus d’un quart de citron, 1 cuillerée à
café de sucre en poudre, 2 / 3 de Bacardi.
Agiter et servir.

1938 Krönlein-Beutel: Das Getränkebuch. Seite 70. Bacardi.

(65er Cocktailglas)
In ein Mischglas
4—6 Eisstückchen (Walnußgröße)
1/2 Schuß Zitronensaft
Schuß Grenadine 10 ccm
Bacardi-Rum 25 ccm
Old Tom Gin 25 ccm
Kirsche
(bestäuben)

1938 Krönlein-Beutel: Das Getränkebuch. Seite 70. Cuba.

(65er Cocktailglas)
In ein Mischglas
4—6 Eisstückchen (Walnußgröße)
Schuß Zitronensaft 10 ccm
Schuß Grenadine 10 ccm
Schuß Karthäuser grün 10 ccm
Arrac 35 ccm
Kirsche
(bestäuben)

1938 Robert Vermeire: L’art du cocktail. Seite 17. Bacardi.

Au shaker:
1/3 jus de limon (genre petit citron
amer).
2/3 Bacardi Ron.
Pour adoucir, sirop de sucre ou grenadine
selon goût.
Bien frapper et passer dans le verre.
En Europe, il est difficile d’obtenir le
limon. Il est d’habitude remplacé par le
citron. Ce cocktail est originaire de Santiago
de Cuba, où le Bacardi Ron est distillé selon
les principes de Cognac: Bacardi s’étant
expatrié de France, a appliqué le procédé des
raisins à la canne à sucre pour préparer ce
rhum blanc très apprécié dans le monde
entier.

1938 Robert Vermeire: L’art du cocktail. Seite 24. Daïquiri.

Au shaker:
1/3 de jus frais de limon.
2/3 Bacardi Ron.
Sucrer selon goût au sirop de framboises ou
à la grenadine.
Frapper et passer dans le verre.
Daïquiri est le nom d’une mine de fer
située dans l’île de Cuba, où ce cocktail est
très populaire. Il bénéficie de la même vogue
en Floride.

1938 Stanley Clisby Arthur: Famous New Orleans Drinks. Seite 60. Daiquiri.

1 teaspoon grenadine sirup
1 lime—juice only
1 jigger rum
Like the Bacardi, the Daiquiri should be well shaken; lime juice,
not lemon, should be used to furnish the tang. The grenadine
sweetens the cocktail and gives it color. Shake well with ice and
strain into the serving glass.
The Daiquiri, like the Bacardi, is a Cuban importation
and is very popular m Havana as well as New Orleans.
Again like the Bacardi its name is truly Cuban, Daiquiri
being the name of a city in the southeastern part of that
famous island not very far from Santiago.
The two cocktails are quite similar, the difference ly-
ing in the inclusion or omission of the grenadine sirup.
Both are good. Daiquiri is pronounced Dah0-ke-reé.

1938 Stanley Clisby Arthur: Famous New Orleans Drinks. Seite 61. Frozen Daiquiri.

1 lime—juice only
1 teaspoon sugar
1 dash white maraschino liqueur
1 jigger rum
Place the lime juice and sugar in an electric mixing cup, dash
on the white maraschino liqueur, and add the rum. Fill half
full of finely crushed ice (shaved ice won’t do) and place cup
under the electric mixer. Let it whirr until the mixture is well
frappéd . . . until it is practically a sherbet. Strain in a saucer-
shaped champagne glass using an ordinary kitchen wire strainer.
Shake from side to side and tap rim of the strainer with spoon
to force the fine icy particles through the mesh.
During the good old summertime a new sort of cock-
tail, with rum for its basis, has taken New Orleans by
storm—a sort of snow storm. If you have not met the
Frozen Daiquiri just picture a champagne glass filled
with snow, cold as Christmas, and as hard as the heart of
a traffic cop.
You’ll have to have something beside the old reliable
cocktail shaker to produce this one. It must be whirred to
its icy smoothness with an electric drink-mixer—the kind
used in making a malted milk.
It is also called “West Indies Cocktail.”

1939 Ambrose Heath: Good Drinks. Seite 27. Daiquiri.

1 glass Bacardi Rum
1 teaspoonful powdered Sugar
The juice of quarter of a Lemon or half a Lime

1939 Anonymus: Bar la Florida Cocktails. Seite 27. Daiquiri No. 1.

2 Onzas Bacardí. 2 Ounces Bacardí.
1 Cucharadita de azúcar. 1 Teaspoonful Sugar.
El iugo de 1/2 limón verde. Juice of 1/2 Lemon.
Hielo menudito. Cracked ice.
Bátase perfectamente y Shake well and strain into
cuélese. cocktail glass.

1939 Anonymus: Cuna del Daiquiri. Seite 27. Daiquiri No. 1.

2 Onzas Bacardí. 2 Ounces Bacardí.
1 Cucharadita de azúcar. 1 Teaspoonful Sugar.
El iugo de 1/2 limón verde. Juice of 1/2 Lemon.
Hielo menudito. Cracked ice.
Bátase perfectamente y Shake well and strain into
cuélese. cocktail glass.

1939 Anonymus: Floridita Cocktails. Seite 27. Daiquiri No. 1.

2 Onzas Bacardí. 2 Ounces Bacardí.
1 Cucharadita de azúcar. 1 Teaspoonful Sugar.
El iugo de 1/2 limón verde. Juice of 1/2 Lemon.
Hielo menudito. Cracked ice.
Bátase perfectamente y Shake well and strain into
cuélese. cocktail glass.

1939 Anonymus: Sloppy Joe’s Cocktail Manual. Seite 8. Daiquiri.

1 Teaspoonful of sugar
2 oz. of Rum.
The juice of a lime.
Shake with cracked ice, and serve in
manhattan glass.

1939 Charles Browne: The Gun Club Drink Book. Seite 86. Daiquiri Cocktail.

A Daiquiri, sometimes called a “Bacardi,” cocktail,
is a fine hot weather drink and is a great specialty
of Constantino at his famous “Florida Bar” in Ha­-
vana. It is made of Bacardi rum, lime or lemon juice
or the two mixed, powdered sugar, sugar syrup or
Maraschino (or both), a teaspoonful to the drink,
and is thoroughly stirred up in shaved ice. Can best
be made with a mechanical mixer. In some places
grenadine syrup or Falernum is used.

1939 Charles H. Baker: The Gentleman’s Companion. Seite 30. Daiquiri.

AND NOW, MESSIEURS et MESDAMES, the ONE & ONLY TROPI-
CAL DAIQUIRI
We honestly believe that more people have boasted about the origin
of this happy thought than any modern drink. We have had to smile
quietly on at least 4 occasions; once overhearing 3 Cuban gentlemen
who had never been out of Havana, 1 alleged German title on a West
Indies Cruise, 1 Racquet Club Member on a fishing trip-why is it
that so many German alleged titles and fancy club members seem to
talk very loud and authoritatively?-and 2 female frequenters of the
New York Colony Club. All of these assorted folk either had helped
invent this drink or had been like THAT with the ones who had in-
vented it!
The whole business is tommyrot, unless these persons knew a cer-
tain 2 officials of the Yankee-run Cuban mining firm taken over dur-
ing the great war by Bethlehem Steel, and which operated in the
mountains not too far out of Santiago de Cuba, where the firm of
Bacardi y Cia., had, and has, its being. The invention was simple, as
so many good things in life are simple, and right smack after the Span-
ish-American war, too. In those days not 1 American in 10,000 had
ever heard of Ron Bacardi, much less invented drinks with it.
There was fever. Doctors still thought that a lot of yellowjack
malaria cases came from drinking water and swamp mists. They
couldn’t turn off the swamp mists but they knew that diluted alcohol
was a disinfectant against germs. So they put a little rum in their
boiled drinking water. This tasted pretty bad so some bright citizen
squeezed a lime into the thing, and a little sugar to modify the acid.
Ice made from distilled water took the tropical blood heat off the
thing. The 2 originators were my friend Harry E. Stout, now domi-
ciled in Englewood, New Jersey, and a mining engineer associate,
Mr. Jennings Cox. TIME: summer of 1898. PLACE: Daiquiri, a
village near Santiago and the Bacardi plant, Cuba. Hence the name
“Daiquiri.”
Like the Martini, Manhattan, Side Car and other immortals, the
Daiquiri marched straight around the world, and we have tried them
in many places and circumstances-including the old Plaza, the Ha-
bana Yacht Club, Country Club, Hotel Nacional-between revolu-
tionary bombings-Sloppy Joe’s, La Florida, the Bacardi Building,
and factory in Santiago; and other spots in Cuba. In spite of all the
loud speeches on the subject we claim there is no “best” place for
Daiquiris. The only thing that can go wrong, besides insufficient
chilling, is that it is often made too sweet. Technique progressed from
the days of drinking with 1 lump of ice in a tumbler, to the flute
cocktail glass with the finely cracked ice left in; then came the electric
vibrator mixer and the screen strainer to improve the thing further
-and it became called the “Tropical” Daiquiri. Now that The Mixer
is available, it frosts beautifully, in a few seconds.
The original Harry Stout-Jennings Cox mixture for the Original
Cuban Daiquiri was: I whisky glass level full of Carta Blanca, or
Carta de Oro Bacardi rum, 2 tsp of sugar, the juice of 1 1/2 small green
limes-strained; and very finely cracked ice.
Either shake very hard with finely cracked ice and pour ice and all
into a tall flute cocktail glass, or put the same things into The Mixer,
and let frost into the delicious sherbet consistency we so admire nowa-
days . . . . Never use lemon juice. And remember please, that a too-
sweet Daiquiri is like a lovely lady with too much perfume. Sugar
should be cut down to I tsp, to our belief, and a Manhattan glass is
less likely to tip over, in steady service!

1940 Anonymus: Libro de cocina. Seite 146. Bacardi.

1 copa de Bacardí Blanco
3 cucharaditas de jugo de limón
1 cucharadita de Granadina

1940 Anonymus: Professional Mixing Guide. Seite 19. Bacardi Cocktail.

Juice of 1/2 Lime, 1/2 teaspoonful fine
granulated Sugar, 1 1/2 oz Bacardi
Rum (white). Place in a mixing glass
and stir thoroughly. Then add fine
cracked ice and shake vigorously.
Serve in cocktail glass. (May be
strained or unstrained, but do not
alter order of ingredients.)

1940 Anonymus: Professional Mixing Guide. Seite 30. Daiquiri Cocktail.

Juice 1/2 Lime, 1 1/2 oz West Indies
Rum (White), teaspoonful fine gran-­
ulated Sugar. Shake well with finely
shaved ice, strain into cocktail glass.
(Also see Frozen Daiquiri.)

1940 Anonymus: Professional Mixing Guide. Seite 32. Frozen Daiquiri.

1 1/2 oz White Rum, juice of 1/2 Lime,
1 teaspoonful fine granulated Sugar.
Shake very strenuously with fine
cracked ice, or use electric mixer,
serve unstrained with short straws, in
a champagne saucer-glass.

1940 Anonymus: Sloppy Joe’s Cocktail Manual. Seite 8. Daiquiri.

1 Teaspoonful of sugar
2 oz. of Sloppy Joe’s Rum.
The juice of a lime.
Shake with cracked ice, and serve
in Manhattan glass.

1940 Charles: The Cocktail Book. Seite 36. Bacardi Cocktail.

1/6 gill of fresh lime juice,
1/3 gill of bacardi rum,
Sugar syrup to taste.
Use the shaker.

1940 Charles: The Cocktail Book. Seite 50. Cuban Cocktail.

1/8 gill of fresh lime juice,
1/8 gill of apricot brandy,
1/4 gill of brandy,
Use the mixing glass.

1940 Crosby Gaige: Crosby Gaige’s Cocktail Guide. Seite 27. Bacardi.

Juice of 1/2 a Lime
1/2 teaspoon powdered Sugar
1 jigger Bacardi Bum
Place in mixing glass and stir thoroughly.
Then add fine cracked ice and shake vigorously.
Strain into cocktail glass. If you want another you can
repeat the process.

1940 Crosby Gaige: Crosby Gaige’s Cocktail Guide. Seite 28. Daiquiri.

1 jigger West Indies Rum
Juice of a Lime
1 teaspoon powdered Sugar
Shake with finely shaved ice and strain
into cocktail glass.
Variation:
4 parts Daiquiri Coctelera Rum
2 parts fresh Lime Juice
1 part Falernum

1940 Crosby Gaige: Crosby Gaige’s Cocktail Guide. Seite 28. Frozen Daiquiri.

(as made in Florida Bar, Havana)
2 oz. White Bacardi Rum
Juice of 1/2 a Lime
1 oz. (or slightly less) White Maraschino
10 oz. shaved ice
Mix in electric cocktail mixer for 1 minute.

1940 Patrick Gavin Duffy: The Official Mixer’s Manual. Seite 143. Daiquiri Cocktail.

1 Jigger Bacardi Rum
2 Dashes Grenadine Syrup
Juice of 1 Lime
Shake well with cracked ice and strain.
Use glass number 2

1941 Anonymus: Book of Hospitality. Seite 39. Bacardi Cocktail.

In a shaker use:
1/3 G & W Distilled London
Dry Gin
2/3 Bacardi Rum
1 tsp. Grenadine
Juice of half a Lime
Add ice and agitate slowly.

1943 Jacinto Sanfeliu Brucart: Cien Cocktails. Seite 20. Bacardi-Cocktail.

Póngase unos pedacitos de hielo en la
cocktelera y añadir:
8/10 de Ron Bacardi
2/10 de jugo de limón
1 cucharadita de Granadina
Agítese bien y sírvase en copa de cocktail.
— El «SANTIAGO», cocktail igualmente famoso, se
prepara con esta misma fórmula —.

1943 Jacinto Sanfeliu Brucart: Cien Cocktails. Seite 27. Cuban-Cocktail.

Póngase en el vaso mezclador unos peda-
citos de hielo y añadir:
1/4 Apricot Brandy
2/4 Coñac
1/4 jugo de limón
Agítese bien y sírvase en copa de cocktail.
— Hay varias fórmulas del «CUBAN», siendo ésta la
más conocida. —

1943 Jacinto Sanfeliu Brucart: Cien Cocktails. Seite 33. Daiquiri-Cocktail.

Póngase en la cocktelera unos pedacitos
de nielo y añadir:
4/5 de Ron Barcardi o Pálido
1/5 de jugo de Lima o limón
1 cucharadita de azúcar
Agítese bien y sírvase en copa de cocktail.
— Es el cocktail preferido de los cubanos. También
se bebe mucho en los Estados Unidos. —

1943 Jacinto Sanfeliu Brucart: Cien Cocktails. Seite 63. Terramar-Cocktail.

Póngase en un vaso mediano:
2 cucharaditas Jugo de Limón
1 cucharadita azúcar
1 copita de Ron Pálido o Bacardi
Disolver el azúcar con una cucharilla y
terminar de llenar con hielo rallado; sírvase
con media rodaja de naranja.
— A don V. M. Tarntella. Hotel Terramar Palace.
Sitges. —

1943 Oscar Haimo: Cocktails Digest. Seite 36. Daiquiri Cocktail.

2 oz. Silver Rum
Juice of Half Lime
1 tsp. Sugar
Shake well.

1943 Oscar Haimo: Cocktails Digest. Seite 36. Daiquiri Frozen.

Same as Daiquiri Cocktail
Add dash of Maraschino
Shaved Ice
Use electric mixer
Serve unstrained in champagne
glass with short straws.

1943 Stanley Clisby Arthur: Famous New Orleans Drinks. Seite 60. Bacardi Cocktail.

1 teaspoon sugar
1 lime — juice only
1 jigger rum Bacardi

Mix in a barglass. Muddle the sugar and lime juice thoroughly
before adding the rum. Fill with cracked ice. Shake well and
then strain into a cocktail glass.
You and I may argue a lot and get nowhere regarding
the proper pronunciation of the word Bacardi, but after
sampling this cocktail, there’ll be no argument as to its
effect and authority. It is by far the best way to serve
sugar cane rum, whether bottled in New England, Cuba,
Jamaica, Puerto Rico, or Louisiana.
In making a Bacardi cocktail be sure to use lime, not
lemon, and put no grenadine or other flavored sirup into
the mixture. When you shake a Bacardi, frappé it long
and well, for it must be served very cold to get the de­-
licious flavor of the rumbullion.
Bacardi rum received its name from the Bacardi family
of Cuba, well-known distillers and bottlers at Santiago of
this particular brand. The correct pronunciation is bah-
car-dé.

1943 Stanley Clisby Arthur: Famous New Orleans Drinks. Seite 60. Daiquiri Cocktail.

1 teaspoon grenadine sirup
1 lime — juice only
1 jigger rum

Like the Bacardi, the Daiquiri should be well shaken; lime juice,
not lemon, should be used to furnish the tang. The grenadine
sweetens the cocktail and gives it color. Shake well with ice and
strain into the serving glass.
The Daiquiri, like the Bacardi, is a Cuban importation
and is very popular in Havana as well as New Orleans.
Again like the Bacardi its name is truly Cuban, Daiquiri
being the name of a city in the southeastern part of that
famous island not very far from Santiago.
The two cocktails are quite similar, the difference ly­-
ing in the inclusion or omission of the grenadine sirup.
Both are good. Daiquiri is pronounced Dah-ke-ree’.

1943 Stanley Clisby Arthur: Famous New Orleans Drinks. Seite 61. Frozen Daiquiri.

1 lime — juice only
1 teaspoon sugar
1 dash white maraschino liqueur
1 jigger rum

Place the lime juice and sugar in an electric mixing cup, dash
on the white maraschino liqueur, and add the rum. Fill half
full of finely crushed ice (shaved ice won’t do) and place cup
under the electric mixer. Let it whirr until the mixture is well
frappéd . . . until it is practically a sherbet. Strain in a saucer-
shaped champagne glass using an ordinary kitchen wire strainer.
Shake from side to side and tap rim of the strainer with spoon
to force the fine icy particles through the mesh.
During the good old summertime a new sort of cock­-
tail, with rum for its basis, has taken New Orleans by
storm — a sort of snow storm. If you have not met the
Frozen Daiquiri just picture a champagne glass filled
with snow, cold as Christmas, and as hard as the heart of
a traffic cop.
You’ll have to have something beside the old reliable
cocktail shaker to produce this one. It must be whirred to
its icy smoothness with an electric drink-mixer — the kind
used in making a malted milk.
It is also called “West Indies Cocktail.”

1944 Crosby Gaige: The Standard Cocktail Guide. Seite 44. Cuban Cocktail.

2 ounces Brandy
3/4 ounce Apricot Brandy
Juice of 1/2 Lime
Shake with cracked ice.

1944 Crosby Gaige: The Standard Cocktail Guide. Seite 57. Bacardi.

Juice of 1/2 Lime
1/2 teaspoon Powdered Sugar
1 jigger Bacardi Rum
Place in mixing glass and stir thoroughly. Then
add fine cracked ice and shake vigorously.
Strain into Cocktail glass.

1944 Crosby Gaige: The Standard Cocktail Guide. Seite 57. Daiquiri.

1 jigger West Indies White Rum
Juice of 1/2 Lime
1 teaspoon Powdered Sugar
Shake with finely shaved ice and strain into
Cocktail glass.

Variation :
4 parts Daiquiri Coctelera Rum
2 parts Fresh Lime Juice
1 part Falernum

1944 Crosby Gaige: The Standard Cocktail Guide. Seite 58. Frozen Daiquiri.

2 ounces White Bacardi Rum
Juice of 1/2 Lime
1 ounce (or slightly less) White
Maraschino
10 ounces Shaved Ice
Mix in electric cocktail mixer for 1 minute.

1944 Harmann Burney Burke: Burke’s Complete Cocktail & Drinking Recipes. Seite 55. Bacardi Cocktail.

4 Bacardi Rum
1 Grenadine
1 Lemon or Lime Juice
Ice. — 35 Shakes. Strain and serve.

1944 Harmann Burney Burke: Burke’s Complete Cocktail & Drinking Recipes. Seite 56. Daiquiri Cocktail.

Bacardi Rum, 1 Glass
Powdered Sugar, 2 Teaspoonsful
Add juice of 1/2 Lemon or1/2Lime.
Ice. — 25 Shakes. Strain and serve.
If desired to suit taste add 3 Dashes of
Grenadine.

1944 Oscar Haimo: Cocktail Digest. Seite 30. * Bacardi Cocktail.

Juice of 1/2 Florida Seedless Lime
4 dashes Grenadine or 1⁄2 tsp. Sugar
2 oz. Bacardi Rum (white or silver
label)
Shake well with finely chipped
ice.

* According to a ruling of the New York Supreme Court, April 28,
1936, the Bacardi Cocktail must be made with bacardi Rum.

1944 Oscar Haimo: Cocktail Digest. Seite 45. Daiquiri Cocktail.

Juice of 1/2 Florida Seedless Lime
1/2 tsp. Sugar
2 oz Rum (White or Silver Label)
Shake well with finely chipped
Ice.

1944 Oscar Haimo: Cocktail Digest. Seite 45. Daiquiri Frozen.

Same as Daiquiri Cocktail
Add dash of Maraschino
2 scoops Shaved Ice
in electric mixer
Serve unstrained in champagne
glass with short straws.

1945 R. M. Barrows & Betty Stone: 300 Ways to Mix Drinks. Seite 10. Daiquiri Cocktail.

2 Oz. Cuban Rum
2/3 Teaspoon Curacao
1 Teaspoon Orange Juice
1 Teaspoon sugar
1/2 Juice of a Lemon
Shake well with ice and strain.

1946 Bill Kelly: The Roving bartender. Seite 30. Daiquiri Cocktail.

Juice 1/2 lime
Sugar 1/2 spoon
Cuban Rum, 1 oz. (white)
Shake.

1946 Bill Kelly: The Roving bartender. Seite 30. Daiquiri Cocktail.

Juice 1/2 lime
Sugar 1/2 spoon
Cuban Rum (white) 1 oz.
Put plenty fine ice in waring
glass and let enough ice through
with drink to fill S oz. glass.

1946 Charles H. Baker, Jr.: The Gentleman’s Companion. Seite 29. Daiquiri.

AND NOW, MESSIEURS et MESDAMES, the ONE & ONLY TROPI­-
CAL DAIQUIRI
We honestly believe that more people have boasted about the origin
of this happy thought than any modern drink. We have had to smile
quietly on at least 4 occasions; once overhearing 3 Cuban gentlemen
who had never been out of Havana, 1 alleged German title on a West
Indies Cruise, 1 Racquet Club Member on a fishing trip — why is it
that so many German alleged titles and fancy club members seem to
talk very loud and authoritatively? — and 2 female frequenters of the
New York Colony Club. All of these assorted folk either had helped
invent this drink or had been like THAT with the ones who had in­-
vented it!
The whole business is tommyrot, unless these persons knew a cer­-
tain 2 officials of the Yankee-run Cuban mining firm taken over dur­-
ing the great war by Bethlehem Steel, and which operated in the
mountains not too far out of Santiago de Cuba, where the firm of
Bacardi y Cia., had, and has, its being. The invention was simple, as
so many good things in life are simple, and right smack after the Span­-
ish-American war, too. In those days not 1 American in 10,000 had
ever heard of Ron Bacardi, much less invented drinks with it.
There was fever. Doctors still thought that a lot of yellowjack
malaria cases came from drinking water and swamp mists. They
couldn’t turn off the swamp mists but they knew that diluted alcohol
was a disinfectant against germs. So they put a little rum in their
boiled drinking water. This tasted pretty bad so some bright citizen
squeezed a lime into the thing, and a little sugar to modify the acid.
Ice made from distilled water took the tropical blood heat off the
thing. The 2 originators were my friend Harry E . Stout, now domi­-
ciled in Englewood, New Jersey, and a mining engineer associate,
Mr. Jennings Cox. TIME: summer of 1898. PLACE: Daiquiri, a
village near Santiago and the Bacardi plant, Cuba. Hence the name.
Like the Martini, Manhattan, Side Car and other immortals, the
Daiquiri marched straight around the world, and we have tried them
in many places and circumstances — including the old Plaza, the Ha-
bana Yacht Club, Country Club, Hotel Nacional — between revolu­-
tionary bombings — Sloppy Joe’s, La Florida, the Bacardi Building,
and factory in Santiago; and other spots in Cuba. In spite of all the
loud speeches on the subject we claim there is no “best” place for
Daiquiris. The only thing that can go wrong, besides insufficient
chilling, is that it is often made too sweet. Technique progressed from
the days of drinking with 1 lump of ice in a tumbler, to the flute
cocktail glass with the finely cracked ice left in; then came the electric
vibrator mixer and the screen strainer to improve the thing further
— and it became called the “Tropical” Daiquiri. Now that The Blender
is available, it frosts beautifully, in a few seconds.
The original Harry Stout-Jennings Cox mixture for the Original
Cuban Daiquiri was: 1 whiskey glass (1 1/2 oz) level full of Carta Blanca, or
Carta de Oro Bacardi rum, 2 tsp of sugar, the juice of 1 1/2 small green
limes — strained; and very finely cracked ice.
Either shake very hard with finely cracked ice and pour ice and all
into a tall flute cocktail glass, or put the same things into The Blender,
and let frost into the delicious sherbet consistency we so admire nowa-
days. . . . Never use lemon juice. And remember please, that a too-
sweet Daiquiri is like a lovely lady with too much perfume. Sugar
should be cut down to 1 tsp, to our belief, and a Manhattan glass is
less likely to tip over, in steady service!
After some rather extensive carpenter work building Tropical
Daiquiris Your Pastor has reached the following conclusions, better-
ments possibly, over the original Daiquiri mix. . . . About 1/2 to 1
average small green lime gives acid aplenty. We always allow 2
ounces of rum. Delicate crowning touch: Sprinkle 3 or 4 drops of
Warrick Frères French Orange Flower Water over the finished drink.

1946 Lucius Beebe: The Stork Club Bar Book. Seite 56. Frozen Daiquiri.

2 oz. silver rum
juice of half lime
1 tsp. sugar
dash of maraschino
shaved ice
Use electric mixer. Serve unstrained in
champagne glass with short straws.

1946 Lucius Beebe: The Stork Club Bar Book. Seite 117. Frozen Strawberry Daiquiri.

1 1/2 oz. Daiquiri rum
1 1/2 oz. lemon juice
3 or 4 ripe strawberries
small spoonful of sugar
Serve in a champagne glass. Make in the
same manner as the usual frozen Daiquiri in
the Waring mixer. It should come out with
a nice color.

1946 Lucius Beebe: The Stork Club Bar Book. Seite 118. French Daiquiri.

1/2 oz. lime juice
2/3 oz. bacardi rum
a little sugar
dash of cassis
few fresh mint leaves
Shake well. Serve in a cocktail glass.

1946 Oscar Haimo: Cocktail and Wine Digest. Seite 35. Bacardi Cocktail.

Juice of 1/2 Lime
4 dashes Grenadine or 1/2 tsp. Sugar
2 oz. Bacardi Rum
Shake.

1946 Oscar Haimo: Cocktail and Wine Digest. Seite 50. Daiquiri Cocktail.

Juice of 1/2 Lime
1/2 tsp. Sugar
2 oz. Rum (white label)
Shake well with finely chipped
Ice.

1946 Oscar Haimo: Cocktail and Wine Digest. Seite 50. Daiquiri Frozen.

Same as Daiquiri Cocktail
Add dash of Maraschino
2 scoops Shaved Ice
in electric mixer
Serve unstrained in champagne
glass with short straws.

1946 Trader Vic: Trader Vic’s Book of Food and Drink. Seite 91. Daiquiri.

No compilation of rum cocktails could be com­-
plete without including that famous and popular
cocktail, the Daiquiri. Constantino of La Florida
Bar in Havana perfected this one and it is to his
credit that this one rum cocktail competes in
popularity with the old stand-bys such as Martinis,
Manhattans, and Old-Fashioneds. Constantino did
not stop with just one Daiquiri, however, and I
have his permission to give you several of his vari­-
ations.

1946 Trader Vic: Trader Vic’s Book of Food and Drink. Seite 91. La Florida Daiquiri No. 1.

2 ounces Bacardi
1 teaspoon sugar
Juice of 1/2 lemon
Cracked ice
Shake well and strain into chilled cocktail glass.

1947 A. Vermeys: Cocktails. Seite 17. Bacardi Cocktail.

1 trait sirop de grenadine; jus d’un quart de
citron; 1/2 verre de Bacardi Rhum.
Antre recette:
1/3 Dry Gin; 2/3 Rhum Bacardi; 1/4 jus de
citron; 3 traits de Grenadine.

1947 A. Vermeys: Cocktails. Seite 36. Daiquiri Cocktail (Le Daiquiri).

Jus d’un grand citron; 1 cuillerée de sucre ou
de grenadine; 2/3 Bacardi (Rhum).

1947 Karl Büskens: Mixbuch für Jedermann. Seite 30. Bacardi.

1/4 Zitronensaft
1/4 Grenadine
1/2 Bacardi-Rum
gut schuttein
Bacardi ist der Name eines
auf Cuba hergestellten Rums

The juice of 1/4 lemon
1/4 Grenadine
1/2 Bacardi-Rum
shake well

1947 Karl Büskens: Mixbuch für Jedermann. Seite 40. Daqueri.

2 Spritzer Grenadine
1/3 Zitronensaft
2/3 Bacardi-Rum
gut schütteln

2 dashes Grenadine
1/3 juice of lemon
2/3 Bacardi-Rum
shake well

1947 Pedro Chicote: Cocktails mundiales. Seite 141. Daiquiri-Cocktail.

Prepárese en cocktelera:
Unos pedacitos de hielo.
Una cucharada de las de café de jugo de limón.
3/4 de copita de ron Bacardí.
Agítese y sírvase en copa de cocktail. A este cock-
tail, en La Habana, suelen poner una cucharada de
granadina y servirlo en vaso grande, terminándole de
llenar de sifón.

1948 Adolphe Torelli: 900 Recettes de Cocktails et Boissons Américaines. Seite 24. Baccardy Cocktail.

Dans un shaker avec
de la glace pilée, une cuillère à café de grena-
dine, le jus d’un demi-citron, un demi-veire à
madère de Rhum Baccardy, agiter, passer dans
un verre à cocktail, garnir d’un zeste de citron.
Chalumeaux.

1948 Anonymus: Ron Daiquiri Coctelera Cocktail Book. Seite 6. Daiquiri No. 1.

1/3 part fresh lime juice.
2/3 part Daiquiri Coctelera.
Sweeten with granulated sugar ar Grenadine,
add cracked ice, and shake well befare serving.

1948 David Embury: The Fine Art of Mixing Drinks. Seite 109. The Daiquiri.

(Also sometimes spelled Dykaree)
At one time the generally accepted distinction be-
tween a Bacardi and a Daiquiri was that one was
made with grenadine and the other with sugar. The
firm of Bacardi y Cia., proprietors of the Bacardi
trade-mark, however, objected to the use of the name
“Bacardi” as applied to any drink not made with
Bacardi rum and maintained in the courts of the
United States their exclusive right to the use of that
name. Accordingly, the cocktail made with sugar is
now known as a Daiquiri and the one made with
grenadine as a Daiquiri Grenadine or Pink Daiquiri.
If vermouth instead of citrus juice is used with the
grenadine, the name is El Presidente. See page 157.
The original and correct recipe for the Daiquiri is
stated in terms of a single cocktail as J/a teaspoonful
sugar, juice of half a lime, and i jigger of white label
rum. This is a cocktail that is difficult to improve
upon. It is dry, yet smooth. The reaction time is short.
The lime and rum blend perfectly. The Daiquiri, like
the Old-Fashioned, deserves an even greater popu-
larity than it now enjoys. For example, it is, in my
opinion, a vastly superior cocktail to the Manhattan,
yet most bars sell many more Manhattans than
Daiquiris. So far as I can ascertain there are two
reasons why more Daiquiris are not sold: the use of
inferior rums and the use of improper proportions.
In the chapter on limes, lemons, and liquors, I
pointed out the inferiority of Puerto Rican rums as
compared with the Cuban and the gross inferiority of
Virgin Island rums. Nevertheless, because of the price
differential, the overwhelming proportion of rum
actually used both by bars and in private homes is
Puerto Rican. There are, it is true, some reasonably
good Puerto Rican rums, but none as good as the
Cuban. Many of the brands are not even fairly good
and you can’t make a good Daiquiri without good
rum. Many bar cocktails are made with lemon instead
of lime juice and with lemons squeezed far in advance
of making the cocktails. Furthermore, since lemon
juice is much cheaper than good rum, it is a common
practice to use more lemon juice and less rum. Since
stepping up the quantity of lemon juice alone might
make the cocktail too sour, the quantity of sugar is
also increased and the result is a cocktail that is any-
thing but dry.
A reasonably good Daiquiri can be made with
lemons instead of limes, but, to most tastes, it will not
be as good as one made with limes. Personally, I prefer
a mixture of the two citrus juices in the proportion of
about one lemon to three or four limes.
Also, other sweetening agents, particularly falernum
and orgeat, can be substituted for the sugar. Both of
these syrups have a slight almond flavor that blends
well with the rum. Falernum, in fact, was invented in
the West Indies specifically for use with rum drinks.
Personally, I think that the slight ginger flavor of faler-
num makes it a better sweetening agent for Jamaica
or the other heavier-bodied rums than for Cuban rum.
Orgeat, I consider ideal for use with Cuban white
label rum. Creme d’ananas is also excellent.
Following, then, are three varieties of the Daiquiri,
all of which are excellent:

DAIQUIRI
1 part Sugar Syrup
2 parts Lime Juice
8 parts White Label Cuban Rum
noShake vigorously with plenty of finely crushed ice and
strain into chilled cocktail glasses.

DAIQUIRI GRENADINE Same as above, but use slightly
less sugar and add two dashes of grenadine for each
drink. Stir sugar, grenadine, and lime juice together
thoroughly before adding the rum.
This is sometimes called the SANTIAGO. But see
page 251.

DAIQUIRI DE LUXE
1 part Orgeat or Creme d’Ananas
2 parts Citrus Juice made by mixing the juice of one
large Lemon with that of three or four large Limes
8 parts Cuban White Label Bacardi or Havana Club
Rum
Shake vigorously with plenty of finely crushed ice and
strain into chilled and frosted cocktail glasses.
No decoration should be used with the Daiquiri be
cause it is a cloudy cocktail. Cherries, olives, etc., are
used largely as a matter of eye appeal and therefore
belong primarily with clear, translucent cocktails such
as the Martini and the Manhattan.
All rum drinks (except hot toddies and the like)
should be frigid when served. Rum, like vodka and
aquavit, is at its best when stinging cold. For that
reason it is best to use finely crushed ice, pre-chill both
shaker (to minimize dilution) and glasses, and, when
shaking, shake as if you were suflfering a super-acute
attack of ague and Saint Vitus dance combined. The
Frozen Daiquiri and other frozen drinks will be dis
cussed in a later chapter.

1948 George Albert Zabriskie: The Bon Vivant’s Companion. Seite 10. Daiquiri.

1 jigger of Bacardi
Juice of 1/2 lime
Sugar to taste
Mix thoroughly and shake well in cracked ice.

1948 Hilario Alonso Sanchez: El arte de cantinero. Seite 274. Daiquiri.

HISTORIA DEL DAIQUIRÍ
Con motivo del fallecimiento del Cantinero del Hotel Pla-
za, llamado Emilio González, más conocido por Maragato, no
faltó quien le atribuyera que fuese él el autor o creador del
ya famoso universalmente coctel “Daiquirí”. Y al hacer la
crónica en la prensa diaria de su fallecimiento y sepelio, así
se dio a conocer al público.
Y, para aclarar la verdadera historia del origen del coctel
Daiqutrí, el Ingeniero F. D. Pagliuchi, comandante del Ejérci-
to Libertador de Cuba, envió al Director del diario “El País”,
de La Habana, la siguiente carta:
“Sr. Director de “El País”,
“Habana.
“Muy señor mío:
“En su apreeiable periódico “El País”, edición de la tar-
de de hoy, he leído un artículo titulado, “Murió anoche “Mara-
gato”, el inventor del “Daíquirí”. Permítame aclarar que el
delicioso “Daiquirí” no se inventó en La Habana, sino en las
minas de Daiquirí, por el Ingeniero Cox, director de esas mi-
nas y el que suscribe.
“Concluida la guerra de independencia de Cuba, en la
cual tuve parte muy activa, conseguí capital americano para
reactivar las viejas minas del Cobre, situadas cerca de San-
tiago de Cuba, de las cuales yo era el director; mientras es-
taba ocupado en este trabajo, tuve ocasión de ir a Daiquirí
para hablar con el señor Cox. Concluido el asunto que me lle-
vara a Daiquirí, le pregunté al señor Cox si me iba a convi-
dar con un cock-tail.
“En el aparador del comedor de las minas, no había ni
gin ni vermouth; sólo había Bacardí, limones, azúcar y hielo.
Con estos elementos hicimos un cock-tail bien batido y muy
frío que me gustó mucho. Entonces le pregunté a Cox: —Y
esto ¿cómo se llama? Él contestó: “Rum Sour”. En los
Estados Unidos hay una bebida que se llama “Whisky Sour”,
que se hace con whisky, azúcar, jugo de limón y hielo» pero
yo le dije: “Este nombre es muy largo, ¿por qué no llamarlo
Daiquirí?
“Después, fuimos para Santiago de Cuba; en el Bar del
“Club Americano”, donde ya había unos cuantos conocidos, pe-
dimos un Daiquirí. El Cantinero contestó que no sabía lo que
era. Entonces Cox le explicó cómo se hacía, recomendan-
do batirlo hasta servirlo muy frío. Algunos de los amigos que
estaban en el Bar, también pidieron un Daiquirí. A todos les
gustó, y muy pronto este cock-tail se hizo popular en San-
tiago, de donde pasó a La Habana y hoy tiene fama mun-
dial. Lo arriba descripto es la verdadera versión de cómo se
inventó el famoso “Daiquirí”.
“De usted atento S. S.
Ingeniero P. D. Pagliuchi, comandante del Ejército Li-
bertador de Cuba”.

1948 Hilario Alonso Sanchez: El arte de cantinero. Seite 367. Daiquiri.

1 vasito de ron cubano.
2 cucharaditas de azúcar.
El jugo de medio limón crio-
llo.
Hielo. Bátase 25 veces,
cuélese y sírvase. Si lo de-
sea el consumidor puede
agregársele 3 chorros de gra-
nadina.

1948 Maurice Bonnet: Le livre d’or du bar americain. Seite 61. Baccardy-Cocktail.

1 cuiller glace pilée,
2 traits de grenadine,
1/2 verre à liqueur jus de citron,
1 verre à liqueur rhum Baccardy.
Agiter et passer dans verre à cocktail, 1 zeste
de citron, paillettes.

1938 Jean Lupoiu: Cocktails. Seite 44. Daiquiri Cocktail.

Dans le shaker:
Le jus d’un quart de citron, 1 cuillerée à
café de sucre en poudre, 2/3 de Bacardi.
Agiter et servir.

1948 Trader Vic: Bartender’s Guide. Seite 208. Bacardi Cocktail 1.

1 1/2 oz. Bacardi Juice 1/2 lime
. 1/2 tsp. powdered sugar
Shake with cracked ice; strain into chilled cocktail glass.

1948 Trader Vic: Bartender’s Guide. Seite 208. Bacardi Cocktail 2.

1 1/2 oz. Bacardi Juice 1/2 lime
. 2 dashes grenadine
Shake with cracked ice; strain into chilled cocktail glass.

1948 Trader Vic: Bartender’s Guide. Seite 213. Cuban Cocktail 1.

1 oz. Bacardi 1/2 oz. fresh lime juice
Shake well with ice; strain into chilled cocktail glass.

1948 Trader Vic: Bartender’s Guide. Seite 213. Cuban Cocktail 2.

1 1/2 oz. Bacardi 1/2 tsp. grenadine
1/2 tsp. maraschino liqueur 1 dash orange bitters
. 2 drops lemon juice
Shake well with ice; strain into chilled cocktail glass. Twist
lemon peel over drink and serve.

1948 Trader Vic: Bartender’s Guide. Seite 213. Cuban Cocktail 3.

1 oz. Bacardi 2 drops Angostura bitters
1/2 oz. Italian vermouth 1 tsp. orange juice
Shake well with ice; strain into chilled cocktail glass.

1948 Trader Vic: Bartender’s Guide. Seite 214. Cuban Cocktail 4.

1 1/2 oz. Bacardi Juice 1/4 lemon
. 1 tsp. powdered sugar
Shake with crushed ice; strain into chilled cocktail glass.

1948 Trader Vic: Bartender’s Guide. Seite 214. Cuban Cocktail 5.

1 oz. Bacardi 1/2 oz. apricot brandy
. Juice 1/2 lime
Shake with cracked ice; strain into chilled cocktail glass.

1948 Trader Vic: Bartender’s Guide. Seite 214. Cuban Cocktail 6.

1 oz. Bacardi 1/2 oz. grenadine
1/2 oz. apricot brandy Juice 1/2 lime
Mix with shaved ice in electric mixer; serve frappé in cham­-
pagne glass.

1948 Trader Vic: Bartender’s Guide. Seite 214. Daiquiri (Standard).

2 oz. white rum Juice 1/2 lime
. 1 tsp. sugar
Shake well with cracked ice; strain into chilled cocktail glass.

1948 Trader Vic: Bartender’s Guide. Seite 214. Daiquiri (Frozen).

2 oz. white rum 1 tsp. sugar
Juice 1/2 lime 1 dash maraschino liqueur
Mix with shaved ice in Waring blender; serve in chilled
champagne glass.

1948 Trader Vic: Bartender’s Guide. Seite 215. La Florida Daiquiri 1.

2 oz. Bacardi 1 tsp. sugar
. Juice 1/2 lemon
Shake with cracked ice and strain into chilled cocktail glass.

1948 Trader Vic: Bartender’s Guide. Seite 225. Oriental Cocktail.

1 1/2 oz. Bacardi Juice of 1 lime
. 1 tsp. fine sugar
Shake with cracked ice; strain into chilled cocktail glass.

1948 Trader Vic: Bartender’s Guide. Seite 220. Tahoe Cocktail.

1 oz. Bacardi 1/2 tsp. fresh lime juice
. 1/2 tsp. sugar syrup
Shake with cracked ice; strain into chilled cocktail glass.

1949 Anonymus: Bottoms Up. Seite 18. Bacardi Cocktail.

1 1/2 oz. Bacardi Rum
Juice 1/2 Lime
1/2 Teaspoon Grenadine
Shake well with cracked Ice, strain
into 3 oz. Cocktail glass.

1949 Anonymus: Bottoms Up. Seite 19. Cuban Cocktail No. 1.

Juice of 1/2 Lime
1/2 Teaspoon Powdered Sugar
2 oz. Rum
Shake well with cracked Ice, strain
into 3 oz. Cocktail glass.

1949 Anonymus: Bottoms Up. Seite 19. Daiquiri Cocktail.

Juice 1 Lime
1 Teaspoon Powdered Sugar
1 1/2 oz. Rum
Shake well with cracked Ice, strain
into 3 oz. Cocktail glass.

1949 Emile Bauwens: Livre de Cocktails. Seite 37. Daïquiri cocktail.

1/2 Cuiller Sucre en Poudre –
3/4 Rhum Bacardi –
1/4 Jus Citron –
Frapper au shaker et passer dans un
verre à cocktail.
Ce cocktail est très populaire
en
Floride.

1949 Harry Schraemli: Das grosse Lehrbuch der Bar. Seite 301. Bacardi-Cocktail.

1 Barlöffel Grenadinesirup, 1/4 Zitronensaft, 1/4 Gin,
1/2 Bacardi-Rum. Schütteln.

1949 Harry Schraemli: Das grosse Lehrbuch der Bar. Seite 337. Cuban-Cocktail (Nr. 1).

Den Saft von 1/2 Zitrone, 1/3 Apricot-Brandy, 2/3 Cognac.
Schütteln. In grosses Cocktailglas seihen.

1949 Harry Schraemli: Das grosse Lehrbuch der Bar. Seite 337. Cuban-Cocktail (Nr. 2).

1 Barlöffel Zucker, 1/4 Zitronensaft, 3/4 Bacardi-Rum.
Schütteln.

1949 Harry Schraemli: Das grosse Lehrbuch der Bar. Seite 337. Cuban-Cocktail (Nr. 3).

1 Barlöffel Grenadinesirup, 1/4 Zitronensaft, 1/4 Arrak,
1/2 Rum. Schütteln.

1949 Harry Schraemli: Das grosse Lehrbuch der Bar. Seite 337. Daicquiri-Cocktail.

1 Barlöffel Grenadinesirup, den Saft von 1/4 Zitrone,
2/3 Bacardi-Rum. Schütteln.

1949 Harry Schraemli: Das grosse Lehrbuch der Bar. Seite 471. Bacardi-Cocktail (Bottled Cocktail).

2 1/2 Glas Grenadinesirup, 3 1/2 Glas Zitronensaft,7 1/2 Glas
Bacardi-Rum, 1 1/2 Glas frisches Wasser.

1949 Wilhelm Stürmer: Cocktails by William. Seite 46. Bacardi Cocktail.

1 Gläschen Bacardi Rum,
1 Schuß Grenadine,
Saft einer halben Zitrone.

1949 Wilhelm Stürmer: Cocktails by William. Seite 50. Daiquiri Cocktail.

1 Gläschen Bacardi Rum,
Saft einer halben Zitrone,
1 Teelöffel Staubzucker.

Wilhelm Stürmer: Cocktails by William. 1949 , page 128-129.
Wilhelm Stürmer: Cocktails by William. 1949, page 128-129.

1950 Ted Shane: Authentic and Hilarious Bar Guide. Seite 83. Bacardi No. 1.

Juice 1/2 Lime 1/2 tsp. Powdered Sugar
. 1 jigger Bacardi
Shake with cracked ice and strain.

1950 Ted Shane: Authentic and Hilarious Bar Guide. Seite 83. Bacardi No. 2.

Juice 1/2 Lime 2 dashes Grenadine
. 1 jigger Bacardi
Shake with cracked ice and strain.

1950 Ted Shane: Authentic and Hilarious Bar Guide. Seite 85. Cuban.

2 dashes Gum Syrup Juice 1/2 Lime
. 1 jigger Bacardi Rum
Shake well with cracked ice and strain.

1950 Ted Shane: Authentic and Hilarious Bar Guide. Seite 85. Daiquiri (Standard).

Juice 1/2 Lime 1 tsp. Sugar
. 2 oz. White Rum
Shake well with cracked ice and strain.

1950 Ted Shane: Authentic and Hilarious Bar Guide. Seite 85. Daiquiri (Bacardi).

2 dashes Grenadine Syrup Juice 1 Lime
. 1 jigger Bacardi Rum
Shake well with cracked ice and strain.

1950 Ted Shane: Authentic and Hilarious Bar Guide. Seite 85. Daiquiri (Frozen).

Juice 1/2 Lime 1 dash Maraschino Liqueur
1 tsp. Sugar 2 oz. White Rum
Mix with shaved ice in Waring blender.

1951 Anonymus: The Holiday Drink Book. Seite 10. Bacardi Cocktail.

Juice 1/2 lime
1/2 teaspoon sugar
Dash of grenadine
1 jigger light or dark Bacardi rum
Shake well in finely chipped ice and
strain into cocktail glass.

1951 Anonymus: The Holiday Drink Book. Seite 12. Daiquiri Cocktail.

Juice 1/2 lime
Teaspoon sugar
1 1/2 oz. light rum
Shake well with finely shaved ice, strain
into cocktail glass. (Also see Frozen
Daiquiri).

1951 Anonymus: The Holiday Drink Book. Seite 14. Frozen Daiquiri.

Juice of 1/2 lime
1 teaspoon sugar
1 1/2 oz. light rum
Shake strenuously with fine cracked ice,
or use electric mixer. Serve unstrained
with short straws, in a Champagne glass.

1951 Charles H. Baker, Jr.: The South American Gentleman’s Companion. Seite 48. The Hosteria Providencia Daiquiri Crusta Especial.

THE HOSTERIA PROVIDENCIA DAIQUIRI CRUSTA ES-
PECIAL, a FRAGRANT & QUITE DELICIOUS AMPLIFICATION of this FA-
MOUS DRINK, as MIXED for us by MANAGER ERNESTO JARA, in SANTIAGO DE
CHILE
This delightful restaurant, noted also elsewhere, serves some of the
best drinks in all South America; and this 1 is an example worth nota-
tion. Do this:
Trim off stem end of small orange 1/3 of the way down and take out
pulp without breaking yellow outer skin. Trim edge into small even
scallops with scissors or pinking shears, and put yellow side out in
goblet; moisten lip with grenadine and dip in fine sugar.
In electric blender put 2 oz best pale rum, 2 tsp grenadine, juice
1/2 lime (no seeds) and 1 pony grapefruit juice. Frappe high speed
with handful fine ice. Pour into orange peel crusta cup in the goblet
and float-on 1/2 to 1 tsp maraschino. Garnish with 2 thin ripe pine-
apple sticks and red cherry. Or instead of floating-on the maraschino
use same amount of dark fragrant Jamaica rum… This drink is one
to break-out for your V.I.P.’s. Ernesto also told us that a single dash
of Angostura lends a nice taste to the mix while in the blender.

1951 Ted Saucier: Ted Saucier’s Bottoms Up. Seite 36. Bacardi.

Juice 1/2 lime
1 teaspoon grenadine
1 jigger white Bacardi
Shake well with finely chopped ice. Strain and
serve in cocktail glass.

1951 Ted Saucier: Ted Saucier’s Bottoms Up. Seite 36. Bacardi (frozen).

Juice 1/2 lime
1 teaspoon grenadine
1 jigger white Bacardi
Pour in electric mixer with shaved ice. Mix and
serve, ice and all, in cocktail glass.

1951 Ted Saucier: Ted Saucier’s Bottoms Up. Seite 82. Daiquiri.

Courtesy, The Dearborn Inn, Dearborn, Michigan
Juice 1 fresh lime
1 teaspoon powdered sugar
2 oz. white rum
Shake well with cracked
cocktail glass.

1951 Ted Saucier: Ted Saucier’s Bottoms Up. Seite 82. Daiquiri (frozen).

Juice 1/2 lime
1/2 teaspoon sugar
1 jigger white Bacardi rum
Place in electric mixer with shaved ice. Serve in
saucer champagne glass, with 2 short straws.

1951 Ted Saucier: Ted Saucier’s Bottoms Up. Seite 82. Daiquiri (original).

Juice 1/2 lime
1 teaspoon powdered sugar
1 jigger Cuban rum
Shake well with finely chopped
cocktail glass and serve.

1952 Anonymus: Cocktails. Seite 65. Bacardi.

Dans le shaker:
Le jus d’1/4 de citron,
Une cuiller à café de grenadine,
Un demi-verre de rhum Bacardi,
Bien frapper et servir.

1952 Anonymus: Cocktails. Seite 70. Daiquiri.

Dans le shaker:
Le jus d’un quart de citron,
1/2 cuiller à café de sucre,
1/2 verre de rhum Bacardi,
Bien frapper et servir.

1952 Charles: The Cocktail Bar. Seite 36. Bacardi Cocktail.

1/6 gill of fresh lime juice,
1/3 gill of bacardi rum,
Sugar syrup to taste.
Use the shaker.

1952 Charles: The Cocktail Bar. Seite 50. Cuban Cocktail.

1/8 gill of fresh lime juice,
1/8 gill of apricot brandy,
1/4 gill of brandy,
Use the mixing glass.

1953 Anonymus: Esquire’s Handbook for Hosts. Seite 113. Daiquiri.

Lime-and-rum of a Cuban sort was put on our social map by the
Spanish-American War. A landing was made at Daiquiri near
Santiago (the home of Bacardi), and the soldiers “refreshed” them-
selves as though this were Ticonderoga — the glad news of their all-
round success spreading through the Army and Navy; since then
our alliance with Ron de Cuba has been continuous and active.

1953 Anonymus: Esquire’s Handbook for Hosts. Seite 113. Daiquiri Cocktail.

Edition of 1898
Juice of half a lime
1 jigger (1 1/2 oz.) Bacardi rum,
White
1 barspoon powdered sugar
Shake vimfully with cracked ice till
shaker frosts; strain into cocktail glass.

1953 Anonymus: Esquire’s Handbook for Hosts. Seite 113. Frozen Daiquiri.

1 jigger (1 1/2 oz.) Bacardi rum,
White
1 barspoon powdered sugar
Shake vimfully with cracked ice till
shaker frosts; strain into cocktail glass.

1953 Anonymus: Esquire’s Handbook for Hosts. Seite 113. Frozen Daiquiri.

Modern Arctic-Tropic Edition
Juice of entire lime
2 oz. Puerto Rican rum, white
1 teaspoon sugar
Assemble in an electric mixer, which
is thereupon filled up with puffed-
wheat-size ice. When almost frappéed,
pour through large-meshed strainer
into a “saucer” champagne glass, al-
lowing enough of the fine ice to tumble
through to form a floe that would tempt
a penguin. A dash (about 20 drops) of
Cointreau is a crafty touch sometimes
applied.
VARIATIONS ON THE THEME: Some in-
sist they form a more perfect union by
adding a dash of white Maraschino
liqueur; others interpolate a squirt of
Triple Sec. Still others pink the whole
situation up with Grenadine, in which
case we are out of the Daiquiri cate-
gory entirely but by no means in the
bleak wilderness if bright eyes have
anything to say about it. A particular
cult even makes beige Daiquiris with
Jamaica.

1953 Anonymus: Esquire’s Handbook for Hosts. Seite 116. Bacardi Cocktail.

There used to be a club in Chicago where you could down one of
these free if you asked for Bac’-ardi instead of Ba-car’-di, but no
matter how you splice it, this rum drink is a favorite — particularly
with the ladies.
1. As served at the Bacardi Distillery,
Santiago
Juice of 1/2 lime
1 teaspoon sugar
1 1/2 oz. Bacardi rum
Shake with very fine ice; strain into
cocktail glass.
2. The pink kind
Juice of 1 lime
1/2 teaspoon sugar
1 1/2 oz. Bacardi rum
dash of Grenadine
Shake well with fine ice; strain into
cocktail glass.
3. Variations on the theme
Juice of half a lime
I teaspoonful of Grenadine
1 part gin
2 parts Bacardi

1953 Anonymus: Esquire’s Handbook for Hosts. Seite 130. Cuban Cocktail.

2/3 brandy
1/3 apricot brandy
Juice of one-half lime
The use of cordials in cocktails has
become firmly established. As so much
of civilized drinking is in the taste and
pleasant afterglow, it is a good varia-
tion on the standard mixtures. There
follow some of the cocktails using cor-
dials, mainly from France where most
of the liqueurs originated.

1953 Anonymus: Manual del bar. Seite 155. Bacardi.

. 1/2 cucharadita de Granadina.
Batido. 70 gramos de Rhum blanco.
Servido en copa de 90 El jugo de medio limón.
gramos.

1953 Anonymus: Manual del bar. Seite 163. Cubano.

. 1 cucharadita de jarabe de
Refrescado. Ananá.
Servido en una copa de 2 golpes de Marrasquino.
120 gramos, con 1 ki- 2 golpes de Licor amarillo.
noto y fruta de esta- 2 golpes de Kirsch.
ción. 1 golpe de Kumel.
. 40 golpes de Vermouth Torino.
. 40 golpes de Dry Gin.

1953 Anonymus: Manual del bar. Seite 163. Cubano (Demi sec).

. 1/2 cucharadita de jarabe de
Refrescado. Ananá.
Servido en una copa de 2 golpes de Marrasquino.
120 gramos, con 1 ki- 2 golpes de Licor Amarillo.
noto y fruta de esta- 2 golpes de Kirsch.
ción. 1 golpe de Kumel.
. 20 golpes de Vermouth To-
. rino.
. 20 golpes de Vermouth Fran-..
.
cese
. 40 golpes de Dry Gin.

1953 Anonymus: Manual del bar. Seite 175. Daiquiri.

. El jugo de medio Limón chico.
Batido. 1 cucharadita de Azúcar im-
Servido en una copa de palpable.
90 gramos. 60 gramos de Rhun blanco.

1953 Anonymus: Manual del bar. Seite 284. Daiquiri Sour.

. El jugo de medio Limón.
Batido. 1 cucharadita de Azúcar.
Servido en una copa de 50 gramos de Rhun Blanco.
90 gramos.

1953 Anonymus: The ABC of Cocktails. Seite 8. Bacardi.

6 parts light Bacardi (Rum)
2 parts Lime Juice
1/2 part Sugar Sirup
3 dashes Grenadine to each drink
Shake with ice, and strain into cock­-
tail glass.

1953 Anonymus: The ABC of Cocktails. Seite 16. Daiquiri.

6 parts White Label Rum
2 parts Lime Juice
1 part Sugar Sirup
Shake with ice, and strain into cock­-
tail glass. 2 dashes of Grenadine may­
be added for each drink.

1953 Anonymus: The ABC of Cocktails. Seite 21. Frozen Daiquiri.

6 parts White Label Rum
2 parts Lime Juice
1 part Sugar Sirup
Shake strenuously with finely shaved
ice, or beat in electric mixer. Pour
without straining into Champagne
glass, and serve with short straws.
Grenadine instead of sugar makes a
Pink Frozen Daiquiri.

1953 Anonymus: The U.K.B.G. Guide to Drinks. Seite 54. Bacardi.

1/2 Glass Bacardi Rum.
Juice 1/2 Lime.
1 teaspoon of Grenadine.
Shake and Strain.

1953 Anonymus: The U.K.B.G. Guide to Drinks. Seite 60. Cuban.

1/2 Brandy.
1/4 Apricot Brandy.
1/4 Fresh Lime Juice.
Shake and Strain.

1953 Anonymus: The U.K.B.G. Guide to Drinks. Seite 60. Daiquiri.

3/4 Daiquiri Rum.
1/4 Fresh Lime or Lemon
Juice.
3 Dashes Gomme Syrup.
Shake and Strain.

1953 Anonymus: The U.K.B.G. Guide to Drinks. Seite 163. Frozen Daiquiri.

Use Champagne glass. Serve with straws. 1/2 Lime or Lemon
Juice. 1/2 teaspoonful Sugar. 2 oz. Dry Rum. Dash of
Maraschino into Electric Mixer with shaved Ice. Serve
unstrained.

1953 David A. Embury: The Fine Art of Mixing Drinks. Seite 116. The Daiquiri, also sometimes spelled Dykaree.

At one time the generally accepted distinction between a Bacardi and a
Daiquiri was that one was made with grenadine and the other with
sugar. The firm of Bacardi y Cia., proprietors of the Bacardi trade-mark,
however, objected to the use of the name “Bacardi” as applied to any
drink not made with Bacardi rum and maintained in the courts of the
United States their exclusive right to the use of that name. Accordingly,
the cocktail made with sugar is now known as a Daiquiri and the one
made with grenadine as a Daiquiri Grenadine or Pink Daiquiri. If
vermouth instead of citrus juice is used with the grenadine, the name
is El Presidente. See page 158.

The original and correct recipe for the Daiquiri is stated in terms of
a single cocktail as 1/2 teaspoonful sugar, juice of half a lime, and 1
jigger of white label rum. This is a cocktail that is difficult to improve
upon. It is dry, yet smooth. The reaction time is short. The lime and
rum blend perfectly. The Daiquiri, like the Old-Fashioned, deserves
an even greater popularity than it now enjoys. For example, it is, in
my opinion, a vastly superior cocktail to the Manhattan, yet most bars
sell many more Manhattans than Daiquiris. So far as I can ascertain
there are two reasons why more Daiquiris are not sold: the use of
inferior rums and the use of improper proportions.

In the chapter on limes, lemons, and liquors, I pointed out the
inferiority of Puerto Rican rums as compared with the Cuban and
the gross inferiority of Virgin Island rums. Nevertheless, because of the
price differential, the overwhelming proportion of rum actually used
both by bars and in private homes is Puerto Rican. There are, it is true,
some reasonably good Puerto Rican rums, but none as good as the
Cuban. Many of the brands are not even fairly good and you can’t
make a good Daiquiri without good rum. Many bar cocktails are made
with lemon instead of lime juice and with lemons squeezed far in
advance of making the cocktails. Furthermore, since lemon juice is
much cheaper than good rum, it is a common practice to use more
lemon juice and less rum. Since stepping up the quantity of lemon
juice alone might make the cocktail too sour, the quantity of sugar
is also increased and the result is a cocktail that is any thing but dry.

A reasonably good Daiquiri can be made with lemons instead of
limes, but, to most tastes, it will not be as good as one made with limes.
Also, other sweetening agents, particularly falernum and orgeat, can
be substituted for the sugar. Both of these syrups have a slight almond
flavor that blends well with the rum. Falernum, in fact, was invented
in the West Indies specifically for use with rum drinks. Personally, I
think that the slight ginger flavor of falernum makes it a better
sweetening agent for Jamaica or the other heavier-bodied rums than
for Cuban rum. Orgeat, I consider ideal for use with Cuban white label
rum. Creme d’ananas is also excellent. …

DAIQUIRI 1 part Sugar Syrup
. 2 parts Lime Juice
. 8 parts White Label Cuban Rum

Shake vigorously with plenty of finely crushed ice and strain into
chilled cocktail glasses.

1953 David A. Embury: The Fine Art of Mixing Drinks. Seite 118. The Cocktail King and his Daiquiris.

For approximately forty years prior to his death in early December
1952, Constante Ribalagua presided over the bar at La Florida (Flo-
ree’-dah), known in recent years as the Floridita to distinguish it from
another restaurant of the same name. He is said to have squeezed over
80 million limes and to have made over 10 million Daiquiris. This
restaurant, at the corner of Obispo and Monserrate street in Havana,
became known as “La Catedral del Daiquiri” – The Temple of the
Daiquiri – and Ribalagua as the Cocktail King – “El Rey de los
Coteleros.” The title was, indeed, well deserved. His limes were gently
squeezed with his fingers lest even a drop of the bitter oil from the
peel get into the drink; the cocktails were mixed (but not overmixed)
in a Warring Blendor; the stinging cold drink was strained through a
fine sieve into the glass so that not one tiny piece of the ice remained
in it. No smallest detail was overlooked in achieving the flawless per-
fection of the drink.

If you acquire a cocktail recipe book from any of the bars in Cuba,
whatch out for their translation of the word “limon” (lee-moan’),
which means both lime and lemon. This is almost invariably incorrectly
translated into English as “lemon”. Sometimes the author specifies
“limon verde” to avoid this confusion but the tanslator is likely to
render this as “green lemon” or even “unripe lemon.” Actually lemons
are almost unknown in Cuba, whereas lime trees grow in everyone’s
own yard.

Here, then, are the recipes for the Cocktail King’s five famous
Daiquiris, together with several other served at the Floridita and
other Havana bars. All are to be mixed in a Blendor and strained into
the glass.

1953 David A. Embury: The Fine Art of Mixing Drinks. Seite 119. Daiquiri No. 1.

1 teaspoonful Sugar
Juice of 1/2 small Lime
2 ounces White Label Rum

It is difficult too restate this in terms of numbers of parts but, bearing
in mind the small size of Cuban limes, it should average about 1:4:16
in place of my standard 1:2:8. Note that this is not stronger than my
1:2:8, but meerely not quite so sweet. It is the same as 1/2:2:8.

1953 David A. Embury: The Fine Art of Mixing Drinks. Seite 234. Cuban.

1 part Curaçao
2 parts Lime Juice
2 parts Pineapple Juice
8 parts White Label Rum
Shake with crushed ice. A twist of lemon over each drink.

Another version of the Cuban omits the pineapple juice and sub
stitutes equal parts of grenadine and maraschino for the curaçao.

Still another version omits the pineapple and substitutes apricot
liqueur for the curaçao and cognac for the rum. This is high treason!
How could any drink be truly Cuban unless made with rum?

1953 „Kappa“: Bartender’s Guide to Mixed Drinks. Seite 10. Bacardi Cocktail.

1 1/2 oz. Bacardi Rum
Juice 1/2 Lime
1/2 Teaspoon Grenadine
Shake well with cracked Ice and strain into 3 oz.
Cocktail glass.

1953 „Kappa“: Bartender’s Guide to Mixed Drinks. Seite 36. Cuban Cocktail.

Juice of 1/2 Lime
1/2 Teaspoon Powdered Sugar
2 oz. Rum
Shake well with cracked Ice and strain into 3 oz.
Cocktail glass.

1953 „Kappa“: Bartender’s Guide to Mixed Drinks. Seite 36. Daiquiri Cocktail.

Juice 1 Lime
1 Teaspoon Powdered Sugar
1 1/2 oz. Rum
Shake well with cracked Ice and strain into 3 oz.
Cocktail glass.

1953 Leo Cotton: Old Mr. Boston Official Bartender’s Guide. Seite 23. Bacardi Cocktail.

1 1/2 oz. Bacardi Rum
Juice 1/2 Lime
1/2 Teaspoon Grenadine
Shake well with cracked Ice and strain
into 3 oz. Cocktail glass.

1953 Leo Cotton: Old Mr. Boston Official Bartender’s Guide. Seite 53. Cuban Cocktail No. 1.

Juice of 1/2 Lime
1/2 Teaspoon Powdered Sugar
2 oz. Old Mr. Boston Imported
Rum
Shake well with cracked Ice and strain
into 3 oz. Cocktail glass.

1953 Leo Cotton: Old Mr. Boston Official Bartender’s Guide. Seite 54. Daiquiri Cocktail.

Juice 1 Lime
1 Teaspoon Powdered Sugar
1 1/2 oz. Old Mr. Boston Imported
Rum
Shake well with cracked Ice and strain
into 3 oz. Cocktail glass.

1953 Leo Cotton: Old Mr. Boston Official Bartender’s Guide. Seite 68. Frosted Daiquiri Cocktail.

See West Indies Frosted Cocktail on
Page 149.

Seite 149. West Indies Frosted Cocktail.

Juice 1 Lime
1 Teaspoon Powdered Sugar
2 oz. Old Mr. Boston Imported Rum
Agitate in electric mixer filled with
shaved Ice for about 2 minutes. Strain
through coarse meshed strainer into
6 oz. Champagne glass.

1953 Leo Cotton: Old Mr. Boston Official Bartender’s Guide. Darin: Become a Perfect Host in 12 Easy Lessons, nach Seite 112. Daiquiri.

For each serving use the juice of 1 Lime, 1 Teaspoon of Powdered
Sugar and 1 1/2 ounces Old Mr. Boston Imported Rum. Shake well
with a few pieces of Cracked Ice in a Cocktail Shaker and strain
into 3 ounce Cocktail Glass. Then you’ll know why the South American
way is so appealing.

Leo Cotton: Old Mr. Boston Official Bartender's Guide. 1953, after page 112.
Leo Cotton: Old Mr. Boston Official Bartender’s Guide. 1953, after page 112.

1953 Marcel et Roger Louc: Cocktails et Grand Crus. Seite 44. Bacardi Cocktail.

Deux traits sucre de canne
Deux traits Grenadine
1/3 Jus de citron
2/3 Rhum Bacardi
Collerette de givre.

1953 Marcel et Roger Louc: Cocktails et Grand Crus. Seite 55. Cubano Cocktail.

Deux traits sucre de canne
1/6 Jus de citron
1/6 Jus d’ananas
2/3 Rhum blanc.

1953 Marcel et Roger Louc: Cocktails et Grand Crus. Seite 55. Daiquiri Cocktail.

Sucre de canne
1/3 Jus de citron
2/3 Rhum blanc.

1953 Marcel et Roger Louc: Cocktails et Grand Crus. Seite 60. Frozen Daiquiri Cocktail.

Opérer de la même façon
que pour le Daiquiri Cock-
tail, en ayant soin de rem-
plir au préalable le verre
avec de la glace râpée.
Décorer avec une demi-
tranche de citron et une
demi-tranche d’orange.

Marcel et Roger Louc: Cocktails et Grand Crus. 1953 , page 44.
Marcel et Roger Louc: Cocktails et Grand Crus. 1953 , page 44.

1953 S. S. Field: The American Drinking Book. Seite 213. Bacardi.

1/2 ounce of lemon or lime juice, 3 dashes of Grenadine or
1/2 teaspoon of sugar, 2 ounces of Bacardi Rum.
A credit to the Bacardi people is the fact that a
fine drink bearing their name is known to prac­-
tically every accredited bartender in the world.
The drink is deserving of its fame.

1953 S. S. Field: The American Drinking Book. Seite 215. Daiquiri.

Juice of 1/2 lime, 1/2 teaspoon of sugar, white of an
egg, 1 jigger of Rum (white label). Shake with cracked ice and strain.
The standard recipe does not specify the egg
white, but try it that way. For a Frozen Dai-
quiri, add a dash of maraschino, and put the
ingredients into an electric mixer with one scoop
of shaved ice. Serve unstrained in chilled Cham-
pagne glass with short straws.

1954 Marcel Pace: Nos Meilleures boissons. Bacardi.

Dans le shaker In shaker
3/5 BACARDI RON
1/5 GRENADINE
1/5 JUS DE CITRON lemon juice
frapper shake well

Marcel Pace: Nos meilleures boissons. Bacardi.
Marcel Pace: Nos meilleures boissons. Bacardi.

1954 Robert H. Loeb, Jr.: Nip Ahoy. Seite 43. Daiquiri.

Robert H. Loeb, Jr.: Nip Ahoy. 1954, page 43.
Robert H. Loeb, Jr.: Nip Ahoy. 1954, page 43.

1954 Robert H. Loeb, Jr.: Nip Ahoy. Seite 44. Frozen Daiquiri.

Robert H. Loeb, Jr.: Nip Ahoy. 1954, page 44.
Robert H. Loeb, Jr.: Nip Ahoy. 1954, page 44.

1954 Robert H. Loeb, Jr.: Nip Ahoy. Seite 52. Bacardi Cocktail.

Robert H. Loeb, Jr.: Nip Ahoy. 1954, page 52.
Robert H. Loeb, Jr.: Nip Ahoy. 1954, page 52.

1955 Anonymus: The U.K.B.G. Guide to Drinks. Seite 54. Bacardi.

1/2 Glass Bacardi Rum.
Juice 1/2 Lime.
1 teaspoon of Grenadine.
Shake and Strain.

1955 Anonymus: The U.K.B.G. Guide to Drinks. Seite 60. Cuban.

1/2 Brandy.
1/4 Apricot Brandy.
1/4 Fresh Lime Juice.
Shake and Strain.

1955 Anonymus: The U.K.B.G. Guide to Drinks. Seite 60. Daiquiri.

3/4 Daiquiri Rum.
1/4 Fresh Lime or Lemon
Juice.
3 Dashes Gomme Syrup.
Shake and Strain.

1955 Anonymus: The U.K.B.G. Guide to Drinks. Seite 163. Frozen Daiquiri.

Use Champagne glass. Serve with straws. 1/2 Lime or Lemon
Juice. 1/2 teaspoonful Sugar. 2 oz. Dry Rum. Dash of
Maraschino into Electric Mixer with shaved Ice. Serve
unstrained.

1955 Harold J. Grossman: Grossman’s Guide to Wines, Spirits, and Beers. Seite 271. Daiquiri.

Juice of 1/2 green lime, freshly expressed
1 barspoon granulated sugar
Put some cracked ice in the shaker and shake it until it gets cold. Add
1 1/2 oz. White Label Cuban or Puerto Rico rum. Shake until the shaker
frosts. Strain and serve.
IMPORTANT! This cocktail should be drunk immediately, because the
rum, lime and sugar tend to separate if the drink is allowed to stand.

1955 Jean Lupoiu: Cocktails. Seite 26. Bacardi Cocktail.

Dans le shaker:
1 jet de sirop de grenadine, le jus de
1/4 de citron, 1/2 verre Bacardi.
Bien agiter et servir.
N.-B. — Dans les Amériques du Nord et du Sud,
ainsi que dans les pays chauds, on se sert pour la
confection du Bacardi et Dacqueri, des citrons du
pays. (Citrus Médica.)

1955 Jean Lupoiu: Cocktails. Seite 49. Cubano Cocktail.

Dans le shaker:
1/6 Jus d’Ananas, 1/6 Rose’s Lime Juce
cordial, 2/6 Rhum blanc.
Agiter et servir.

1955 Jean Lupoiu: Cocktails. Seite 50. Daiquiri Cocktail.

Dans le shaker:
Le jus d’un quart de citron, 1 cuillerée à
café de sucre en poudre, 2/3 de Bacardi.
Agiter et servir.

1956 Patrick Gavin Duffy: The Official Mixer’s Manual. Seite 83. Bacardi No. 1.

2 Jiggers Bacardi Rum
Juice of 1/2 Lime
2 Dashes Sugar Syrup
Shake well with ice and strain
into glass.

1956 Patrick Gavin Duffy: The Official Mixer’s Manual. Seite 83. Bacardi No. 2.

Prepare same as No. 1, substi­
tuting Grenadine for Sugar
Syrup.

1956 Patrick Gavin Duffy: The Official Mixer’s Manual. Seite 84. Cuban No. 2.

(see Bacardi No. 1)

1956 Patrick Gavin Duffy: The Official Mixer’s Manual. Seite 84. Cuban No. 3.

1-1/2 Jiggers Bacardi Rum
1/2 Jigger Apricot Brandy
Juice of 1/2 Lime
Shake well with ice and strain
into glass.

1956 Patrick Gavin Duffy: The Official Mixer’s Manual. Seite 84. Cuban No. 4.

1 Jigger Bacardi Rum
1 Jigger Pineapple Juice
1 Teaspoon Grenadine
1 Teaspoon Maraschino
Fill large glass with shaved ice
and pour mixed ingredients over.
Serve with straws.

1956 Patrick Gavin Duffy: The Official Mixer’s Manual. Seite 84. Daiquiri.

1-1/2 Jiggers Light Rum
Juice of 1/2 Lime
1 Teaspoon Powdered Sugar
Shake well with ice and strain
into glass.

1956 Patrick Gavin Duffy: The Official Mixer’s Manual. Seite 84. Daiquiri (frozen).

2 Jiggers Light Rum
1 Tablespoon Lime or Lemon
Juice
2 Teaspoons Powdered Sugar
Place 2 cups shaved ice in a
blender. Add ingredients and
blend until consistency of snow.
Serve immediately with straw.
With a blender, fresh or frozen
fruit or juices may be added to
the DAIQUIRI, as desired.

1957 Henri Barman: Cocktails et autres boissons mélangées. Seite 22. Bacardi.

Shaker, glace
1/2 Rhum Bacardi
1/2 jus de citron frais
2 traits sirop de sucre ou
Grenadine
Bien frapper au shaker et
passer dans verre à cocktail.
Mélangeur électr. : voir note.

1957 Henri Barman: Cocktails et autres boissons mélangées. Seite 36. Cuban (1).

Timbale à mélange, glace
2/3 Cognac
1/3 Apricot Brandy
jus frais 1/3 citron
Bien remuer en timbale et
passer dans verre à cocktail.
Mélangeur électr. : voir note.

1957 Henri Barman: Cocktails et autres boissons mélangées. Seite 36. Cuban (2).

1/2 Rhum Bacardi
1/2 jus d’ananas
1 cuill. à thé Grenadine
1 cuill. à thé Marasquin
Remplir grand verre à cock-
tail et ajouter les ingrédients
remués en timbale.

1957 Lawrence Blochman: Here’s How. Seite 52. Daiquirí.

2 ounces Bacardi rum 1 teaspoon sugar
. Juice of 1 small lime
Shake with plenty of cracked ice until you are out of
breath and your eyes begin to glaze. Then strain into
chilled cocktail glass.

The Daiquiri (call it Dackeree if you want, but the
correct pronunciation is Dye-kee-ree) is credited to some
American engineers who, after the Spanish-American War,
were stationed at a place in Cuba called — you guessed i t—
Daiquiri. And since Daiquiri was midway between Guan­-
tánamo Bay and Santiago, where the Barcardi people were
conjuring up their precious elixir, the original Daiquiri was
made with Bacardi rum. The cocktail can of course be
approximated with any good light Cuban or Puerto Rican
rum. You can even use lemon juice instead of lime, but in
that case you will have only an ersatz Daiquirí. The taste
cannot be the same.

1957 Lawrence Blochman: Here’s How. Seite 53. Frozen Daiquirí.

2 ounces light rum 1 teaspoon sugar
. Juice of 1 small lime
Shake long, rapidly, and rhythmically with finely
crushed ice. Pour without straining into a chilled cham­-
pagne goblet the rim of which has been rubbed with a
lime peel and dipped in granulated sugar. Serve with
short straws.

The frozen Daiquirí may also be made in an electric
blender. Simply put the three essential ingredients in the
blender with a generous cupful of finely crushed or shaved
ice and churn until you have a thick purée. Again do not
strain. A third way of making a frozen Daiquirí is to pack
a champagne goblet firmly with shaved ice, then depress
one edge of the ice pack with the thumb until the other edge
rises 45 degrees above the opposite horizon. Mix and
shake your Daiquirí in the usual manner and strain into
the hollow of the ice-filled goblet. Poke the straws into the
neve.

1957 Lawrence Blochman: Here’s How. Seite 53. Bacardi Cocktail.

Mix a Daiquirí, using a teaspoon of grenadine instead
of sugar.

1957 Lawrence Blochman: Here’s How. Seite 56. Cuban Cocktail.

2 parts Bacardi rum 1 part apricot cordial
. 1 teaspoon lime juice
Shake with ice, strain.

1959 Anonymus: Manual del cocteleria. #8. Banana Daiquiri.

1/4 onza de jugo de limón
1/4 onza de Ron Carta Blanca
1 1/2 onza de Banana (Special para cocktail)
En cotelera eléctrica, frappé y servido en copa
de cocktail.

1959 Anonymus: Manual del cocteleria. #35. Daiquiri.

Una cucharadita de azúcar
Una cucharadita de Marraschino
1/4 onza de jugo de limón
1 1/2 onza de Ron Carta Blanca
Batido en cotelera eléctrica y servido en copa
de Champagne

1959 Fernando Gaviria: El coctel y sus derivados. Seite 37. Daiquiri.

Prepárese en cocktelera:
Unos pedacitos de hielo.
Dos cucharadas de azúcar.
El jugo de medio limón.
Una copa de Ron Bacardi.
Muy batido, sírvase en copa de Champag-
ne debidamente preparada con hielo
Pilei.

1960 Anonymus: Recetas para cocteles. Seite 18. Bacardi Cocktail.

Una cucharadita de azúcar
1/4 onza de jugo de limón
1 1/2 onza de Ron Carta Blanca
Batido a mano y servido en copa de cocktail alta.

1960 Anonymus: Recetas para cocteles. Seite 28. Daiquirí (1).

El jugo de 1/2 limón (1/2 onza)
1/2 cucharadita de azúcar
11/2 onzas de Ron Carta Blanca
Hielo picado
Se combinan el azúcar y el jugo de limón. Se
añaden el hielo y el Ron. Se agita bien y se
sirve en copas de coctel.

1960 Anonymus: Recetas para cocteles. Seite 28. Daiquirí (2).

El jugo de 1/2 limón (1/2 onza)
1 cucharadita de jugo de toronja
1 cucharadita de azúcar
1 cucharadita de Marraschino
2 onzas de Ron
Hielo picado
Se combina el azúcar con el jugo de limón y
el de toronja. Se añaden el hielo, el Marraschi-
no y el Ron. Se agita bien y se sirve en copas
de coctel.

1960 Anonymus: Recetas para cocteles. Seite 29. Daiquirí (3).

El jugo de 1/2 limón (1/2 onza)
1 cucharadita de jugo de toronja
1 cucharadita de azúcar
2 gotas de Curacao
2 onzas de Ron
Hielo picado
Se combina el azúcar con el jugo de limón y
el de toronja. Se añaden el Curacao, el hielo
y el Ron. Se agita bien y se sirve en copas
de coctel.

1960 Anonymus: The U.K.B.G. Guide to Drinks. Seite 52. Bacardi.

1/2 Glass Bacardi Rum.
Juice 1/2 Lime.
1 teaspoon of Grenadine.
2 Dashes Cointreau.
Shake and Strain.

1960 Anonymus: The U.K.B.G. Guide to Drinks. Seite 60. Cuban.

1/2 Brandy.
1/4 Apricot Brandy.
1/4 Fresh Lime Juice.
Shake and Strain.

1960 Anonymus: The U.K.B.G. Guide to Drinks. Seite 60. Daiquiri.

3/4 Bacardi.
1/4 Fresh Lime or Lemon
Juice.
3 Dashes Gomme Syrup.
Shake and Strain.

1960 Anonymus: The U.K.B.G. Guide to Drinks. Seite 141. Frozen Daiquiri.

Use Champagne glass. Serve with straws. 1/2 Lime or Lemon
Juice. 1/2 teaspoonful Sugar. 2 oz. Bacardi. Dash of
Maraschino into Electric Mixer with shaved Ice. Serve
unstrained.

1960 Anonymus: Tout les cocktails et les boissons rafraichissante. Seite 19. Bacardi.

3/5 Rhum
1/5 Grenadine
1/5 jus de citron

1960 Anonymus: Tout les cocktails et les boissons rafraichissante. Seite 39. Daiquiri.

2/3 Rhum
1/3 jus de citron
1 cuillerée de grenadine

1960 Anonymus: Tout les cocktails et les boissons rafraichissante. Seite 39. Daiquiri 2.

1 verre de Rhum blanc
1 cuillerée sirop de sucre
1/2 jus de citron

1960 Anonymus: Tout les cocktails et les boissons rafraichissante. Seite 131. Daiquiri.

1/2 citron, une cuillère à café de sucre.
Porto blanc, cubes de glace.
Préparez le jus d’un demi citron; adoucissez-le avec une cuil-
lère à café de sucre. Ajoutez un verre à liqueur de Porto blanc.
Remuez avec de la glace. Filtrez dans un verre sur cubes de glace.

1960 Mapie de Toulouse-Lautrec & Robert J.-Courtine: A boire, a boire. Seite 52. Daiquiri.

POUR UNE PERSONNE:
LE JUS
D’UN DEMI-CITRON
1 CUILLERÉE A CAFÉ
DE SUCRE EN POUDRE
1 VERRE A COCKTAIL
DE RHUM BACARDI
GLACE PILÉE
Dans le fond d’un shaker, mettez de la glace
pilée et versez dessus le jus de citron et le sucre,
puis le rhum bacardi. Secouez fortement avant
de servir dans les verres à cocktail.

1961 Anonymus: Cocktails y bocaditos. Seite 40. Daiquiri.

(Para 1 porción)
Limón chico, medio (el jugo) – Azúcar, 1 cucharadita – Rhum
blanco, 2 medidas – Hielo picado, 3 cucharadas.
• Batir en la coctelera todos los ingredientes.
• Colar y servir en copa de 80 gramos.

1961 Anonymus: Cocktails y bocaditos. Seite 90. Daiquiri De Luxe.

(Para 4 porciones)
Horchata o crema de ananá, 1 medida – Jugo de limo y limón,
2 medidas – Rhum, 8 medidas – Hielo granizado, 1 vaso.
• Batir los ingredientes con el hielo.
• Colar en vasos de 90 gramos previamente
helados y escarchados.

1961 Pedro Chicote – El bar en el mundo. Seite 130. Bacardi Cocktail.

Prepárese en cocktelera:
3 ó 4 pedacitos de hielo.
Una cucharada de las de ca­-
fé de azúcar.
Dos cucharadas de las de
café de jugo de limón y
el resto de ron Bacardí.
Sírvase en copa de cocktail,
con una corteza de limón.

1961 Pedro Chicote – El bar en el mundo. Seite 142. Cubano Cocktail.

Prepárese en cocktelera:
Unos pedacitos de hielo.
Una cucharada grande de
jugo de limón.
Una cucharada pequeña de
azúcar.
Una copa de ron.
Agítese y sírvase en copa de
cocktail.

1961 Pedro Chicote – El bar en el mundo. Seite 147. Daiquiri Cocktail.

Prepárese en cocktelera:
Unos pedacitos de hielo ma­-
chacado.
Unas gotas de marrasquino.
Una cucharada de las de café
de jugo de limón.
3/4 de copita de ron Bacardí.
Agítese y sírvase en copa de
cocktail.

1963 Eddie Clarke: Shaking in the 60’s. Seite 77. Frozen Daiquiri (Sloppy Joe’s, Havana).

Almost Jill a champagne glass with shaved ice,
then tip this quantity into an electric mixer and
add the following:
juice of 1/2 fresh lime
1/2 teaspoonful sugar
1 measure of Bacardi rum
After mixing, pour contents back into the
champagne glass, unstrained, and serve with
straws.

Eddie Clarke: Shaking in the 60’s.1963 , page 77.
Eddie Clarke: Shaking in the 60’s.1963 , page 77.

1963 Eddie Clarke: Shaking in the 60’s. Seite 90. Bacardi Cocktail.

2 measures Bacardi rum
1/2 measure fresh lime or lemon juice
dash of Grenadine
Shake well and strain into a cocktail glass.

1963 Eddie Clarke: Shaking in the 60’s. Seite 94. Daiquiri Cocktail.

1 measure Bacardi or light rum
juice of 34 lime or 1/4 lemon
1 teaspoonful powdered sugar
Shake well and strain into a cocktail glass.

1963 Luigi Veronelli: I cocktails. Seite 35. Bacardi Cocktail.

4 parti di rhum cubano bianco (ma qui sarebbe ob-
bligatoria una marca, cascami lingua, il Bacardi)
1 parte di succo di limone spremuto dalla sola polpa
1/2 cucchiaino, per ciascun drink, di granatina
1 scorzetta di limone senza nulla del bianco interno,
per ciascun drink

1963 Luigi Veronelli: I cocktails. Seite 35. Daiquiri.

4 parti di rhum cubano bianco
1 parte di succo di limone spremuto dalla sola polpa
1/2 cucchiaino di sciroppo di zucchero, per ciascun
drink
1 scorzetta di limone senza nulla del bianco interno,
per ciascun drink

1963 Luigi Veronelli: I cocktails. Seite 75. Bacardi Cocktail.

1 bicchiere e 1/3 di rhu,m cubano bianco bacardi
1/3 di bicchiere di succo di limone spremuto dalla
sola polpa
4 gocce di granatina
2 scorzette di limone senza nulla del bianco interno
(facoltativo)
ghiaccio tritato
Riempire lo shaker fino a 1/4 della sua altezza con ghiac-
cio tritato. Versare il succo di limone ed il rhum; aggiun-
gere la granatina. Chiudere lo shaker, agitarlo vigorosa-
mente, lasciarlo riposare un secondo, riprendere infine
ad agitare ma più lentamente. Servire

1963 Luigi Veronelli: I cocktails. Seite 118. Daiquiri Cocktail.

1 bicchiere e 1/3 di rhum cubano bianco
1/3 di bicchiere di succo di limone spremuto dalla
sola polpa
1 cucchiaino di sciroppo di zucchero (qui è rigoro-
samente necessario lo sciroppo; lo zucchero nuo-
cerebbe)
2 scorzette di limone sènza nulla del bianco interno
ghiaccio a cubetti
Riempire lo shaker fino a 1/4 della sua altezza con ghiac-
cio a cubetti. Versare il succo di limone ed il rhu,; ag-
giungere lo sciroppo. Chiudere lo shaker, agitarlo vigo-
rosamente, lasciarlo riposare un secondo, riprendere in-
fine ad agitarlo ma più lentamente. Servire subito in bic-
chieri guarniti con una scorzetta di limone.

1964 Anonymus: Peter Pauper’s Drink Book. Seite 11. Daiquiri.

6 parts White Label Rum
2 parts Lime Juice
1 part Sugar Syrup
This is a Rum Sour or Bacardi under its more
common name.

1964 Anonymus: Peter Pauper’s Drink Book. Seite 12. Frozen Daiquiri.

6 parts White Label 2 parts Lime Juice
Rum 1 part Sugar Syrup
Shake strenuously with fine shaved ice, or
beat in electric mixer. Pour without straining
into champagne glass, and serve with short
straws. Grenadine instead of sugar makes a
Pink Frozen Daiquiri.

1964 Anonymus: Peter Pauper’s Drink Book. Seite 18. Pink Daiquiri.

6 parts White Label Rum
2 parts Lime Juice
1 part Grenadine
Since lime and lemon juice are cloudy, the
pink color makes a more attractive-looking
drink.

1964 Anonymus: Peter Pauper’s Drink Book. Seite 8. Bacardi.

6 parts light Bacardi (Rum)
2 parts Lime Juice
1/2 part Sugar Syrup (or more)
3 dashes Grenadine to each drink
This is a pink Rum Sour or Daiquiri: but by
court ruling a bartender must use Bacardi
rum when the customer asks for a “Bacardi.”

1964 Anonymus: Peter Pauper’s Drink Book. Seite 11. Daiquiri.

6 parts White Label Rum
2 parts Lime Juice
1 part Sugar Syrup
This is a Rum Sour or Bacardi under its more
common name.

1964 Anonymus: Peter Pauper’s Drink Book. Seite 12. Frozen Daiquiri.

6 parts White Label 2 parts Lime Juice
Rum 1 part Sugar Syrup
Shake strenuously with fine shaved ice, or
beat in electric mixer. Pour without straining
into champagne glass, and serve with short
straws. Grenadine instead of sugar makes a
Pink Frozen Daiquiri.

1965 Aladar von Wesendonk: 888 Cocktails. Seite 71. Daiquiri.

5/8 Bacardi White Label Rum
1/5 Zitronensaft
ein geeistes Glas füllen
1/8 Limesirup
1/5 Zuckersirup
im shaker mit Eis stark schütteln,
abseihen

1965 Anonymus: John de Kuyper’s Complete Guide to Cordials. Seite 10. Daiquiri De Kuyper.

2 ounces light rum
Juice of 1/2 lime
1/2 ounce De Kuyper Creme de Almond
(Noyaux)
Shake vigorously with crushed ice, strain
into cocktail glass.

1965 Anonymus: The U.K.B.G. Guide to Drinks. Seite 56. Bacardi.

3/4 Bacardi Rum.
1/4 Fresh Lime Juice.
A teaspoon of Grenadine.
SHAKER.

1965 Anonymus: The U.K.B.G. Guide to Drinks. Seite 64. Cuban.

1/2 Brandy. * * *
1/4 Apricot Brandy.
1/4 Fresh Lime Juice.
SHAKER.

1965 Anonymus: The U.K.B.G. Guide to Drinks. Seite 64. Daiquiri.

3/4 Bacardi.
1/4 Fresh Lime or Lemon
Juice.
3 Dashes Gomme Syrup.
SHAKER.

1965 Anonymus: The U.K.B.G. Guide to Drinks. Seite 142. Frozen Daiquiri.

Use Champagne glass. Serve with straws. 1 oz. Lime or Lemon
Juice. 1/2 teaspoonful Sugar. 2 ozs. Bacardi. Dash of
Maraschino into Electric Mixer with shaved Ice. Serve
unstrained.

1965 Harry Schraemli: Manuel du bar. Seite 350. Bacardi Cocktail.

1 cuillère à bar de sirop grenadine, 1/4 jus de citron, 3/4 Bacardi Amber
Label. Agiter.

Harry Schraemli: Manuel du bar. 1965, after page 384. Bacardi Cocktail.
Harry Schraemli: Manuel du bar. 1965, after page 384. Bacardi Cocktail.

1965 Harry Schraemli: Manuel du bar. Seite 391. Daiquiri Cocktail (recette américaine).

Préparer à la machine (mélangeur électrique). Mettre beaucoup de
petits dés de glace, 1 cuillère à bar de sucre, 1/2 jus de limon (lime
juice), 1 mesure de rhum blanc. Faire tourner le moteur environ 20
secondes. Servir dans un grand verre à cocktail rempli de glace fine-
ment pilée (frozen glass). Ajouter 1 cerise.

1965 Harry Schraemli: Manuel du bar. Seite 391. Daiquiri Cocktail (recette moderne).

1/2 cuillère à bar sirop de grenadine, 1/2 cuillère de cointreau, 1/4 jus
de citron, 3/4 rhum blanc. Agiter.

1965 Harry Schraemli: Manuel du bar. Seite 392. Daiquiri on the rocks.

Mettre dans le shaker 1/2 jus de citron, 3 cuillères à bar de sirop de
gomme (ou 1 cuillère à bar gouttes d’assugrine) et 1 mesure (50 g)
Bacardi Silver Label (blanc). Très bien agiter et verser dans un tumb-
ler rempli de dés de glace.

1965 Harry Schraemli: Manuel du bar. Seite 403. Frozen Daiquiri Cocktail.

Remplir un grand verre à cocktail de petits dés de glace, de sorte
qu’il soit bien rafraîchi. Mettre dans le mélangeur électrique pas-
sablement de glace, 2 cuillères à bar de sucre, 1/2 lime juice, 1 verre
de rhum blanc et bien mélanger le tout. Retirer la glace du verre à
cocktail et y verser le mélange. Servir avec paille.

1965 Harry Schraemli: Manuel du bar. Seite 489. Bacardi Cocktail [(Bottled Cocktail)].

2 1/2 verres sirop de grenadine, 3 1/2 jus de citron, 7 1/2verres rhum Ba­-
cardi, 11/2verre eau fraîche.

1965 Robert London & Anne London: Cocktails and Snacks. Seite 42. Bacardi Cocktail #1.

1 1/2 ounces Bacardi rum 1 teaspoon fine grain sugar
Juice of 1/2 lime
Combine in shaker and stir well. Add finely cracked ice and shake
well. Strain into cocktail glass.

1965 Robert London & Anne London: Cocktails and Snacks. Seite 42. Bacardi Cocktail #2.

1 1/2 ounces Bacardi rum 1/2 teaspoon fine grain sugar
Juice of 1 lime Dash of grenadine
Combine in shaker and stir well. Add finely cracked ice and shake
well. Strain into cocktail glass.

1965 Robert London & Anne London: Cocktails and Snacks. Seite 42. Cuban Cocktail #1.

2 ounces Bacardi rum Juice of 1/2 lime or 1/4 lemon
3/4 ounce apricot brandy
Shake with cracked ice. Strain into cocktail glass.

1965 Robert London & Anne London: Cocktails and Snacks. Seite 43. Cuban Cocktail #2.

1 ounce Bacardi rum 1 teaspoon grenadine
1 ounce pineapple juice 5 drops maraschino liqueur
Mix ingredients and pour into a goblet filled with shaved ice. Serve
with short straws.

1965 Robert London & Anne London: Cocktails and Snacks. Seite 43. Cubano Cocktail.

2 ounces Cuban rum 1/4 ounce pineapple juice
Juice of 1/2 lime
Shake with cracked ice. Strain into cocktail glass.

1965 Robert London & Anne London: Cocktails and Snacks. Seite 43. Daiquiri.

2 ounces white label rum 1 teaspoon fine grain sugar
Juice of 1/2 lemon or lime
Shake well with finely shaved ice. Strain into cocktail glass.

1965 Robert London & Anne London: Cocktails and Snacks. Seite 43. Frozen Daiquiri.

2 ounces white label rum 1 teaspoon fine grain sugar
Juice of 1/2 lemon or lime Dash of maraschino liqueur
Shake very vigorously with 8 to 10 ounces shaved ice or mix in electric
blender for 1 minute. Serve unstrained in champagne glass with short
straws.

1966 Harry Schraemli: Le roi du bar. Seite 21. American Daiquiri Cocktail.

Mélangeur électrique. Glace, 1/2 lime-
juice, 1 cb [cuillère de bar] de sucre, 1 rhum blanc. Mélan-
ger pour 40 secondes. Servir en «frozen
glass» avec cerise.

1966 Harry Schraemli: Le roi du bar. Seite 28. Bacardi Cocktail.

Shaker. 1 cb [cuillère de bar] de grenadine, 1/4 jus de ci-
tron, 3/4 rhum Bacardi Amber Label.

1966 Harry Schraemli: Le roi du bar. Seite 78. Cuban Cocktail.

Shaker. 1/2 jus de citron, 1/3 apricot-brandy,
2/3 cognac. Grand verre à cocktail.

1966 Harry Schraemli: Le roi du bar. Seite 79. Daiquiri Cocktail (recette américaine).

Préparer à la machine (mélangeur élec- ­
trique). Beaucoup de petits dés de glace,
1 cb [cuillère de bar] sucre, 1/2 jus de limon (lime-juice),
1 rhum blanc. Faire tourner le moteur env.
20 secondes. Grand verre rempli de glace
pilée (Frozen glass). Cerise.

1966 John Doxat: Booth’s Handbook of Cocktails and Mixed Drinks. Seite 89. Bacardi Cocktail.

1/2 ‘Bacardi’ Rum
1/4 Lemon Juice or Lime Juice
1/4 Grenadine
Shake well, strain into cocktail-glass.

1966 John Doxat: Booth’s Handbook of Cocktails and Mixed Drinks. Seite 90. Daiquiri.

Traditionally —
1/2 ‘Bacardi’ Rum
1/4 fresh Lime Juice
1/4 Grenadine
Shaken and strained; served very cold.
But Lemon may now replace Lime, and Sugar the Grena­-
dine.
* Is also known as Bacardi Cocktail, as there is now an
excellent rum called Daiquiri. (See footnote to p. 88.)

1966 Mario Kardahi: Tratado práctico de coctelería. Seite 158. Daiquiri.

. El jugo d e medio limón.
Batido. 1 cucharadita ele azúcar im-
Servir en copa flauta. palpable.
. 60 grs. de Rhum Blanco.

1966 Mario Kardahi: Tratado práctico de coctelería. Seite 193. Daiquiri Fizz.

Batido. El jugo de medio limón.
Servir en copa flauta. 2 cucharaditas de azúcar
. impalpable.
. 50 grs. de Rhun Blanco.
. Se termina de llenar con
. soda.

1966 Oscar Haimo: Cocktail and Wine Digest. Seite 35. Bacardi Cocktail.

Juice of 1/2 Lime, 4 dashes Grenadine or 1/2 tsp. Sugar
2 oz. Bacardi Rum. Shake well with Ice & Strain.

1966 Oscar Haimo: Cocktail and Wine Digest. Seite 49. Daiquiri Cocktail.

Juice of 1/2 Lime, 1/2 tsp. Sugar
2 oz. Rum (white label)
Shake well with Finely chipped Ice & Strain.

1966 Oscar Haimo: Cocktail and Wine Digest. Seite 49. Daiquiri Frozen.

Same as Daiquiri Cocktail, add 4 dashes of Maraschino
2 scoops Shaved Ice in electric mixer
Serve unstrained in champagne glass with short straws.

1968 Anonymus: The Dieter’s Drink Book. Seite 6. Bacardi.

1 1/2 oz. light Bacardi rum
1 tbs. lime juice
1/2 tsp. sugar
Shake ingredients well with cracked ice. Strain
into chilled cocktail glass.
Variation: Mix in dash grenadine.

1968 Anonymus: The Dieter’s Drink Book. Seite 9. Daiquiri / Frozen Daiquiri.

1 1/2 oz. light rum, 80 proof
1 tbs. lime juice
1/2 tsp. sugar
Shake ingredients well with cracked ice. Strain
into chilled cocktail glass.
Frozen Daiquiri: Place ingredients above in
electric blender. Add cracked ice; blend. Pour,
without straining, into champagne glass.

1969 Mario Kardahi & Raul Echenique: El arte de la exquisitez y del buen beber. Seite 350. Daiquiri.

Batido. Servir en copa Flauta.
El Jugo de medio Limón,
1 cucharadita de azúcar impalpable,
60 gramos de Rum Blanco.

1971 Anonymus: Tropical Recipes. Standard Recipes. Bacardi Cocktail.

(Shake)
Cocktail Glass (Chill)
Mixing Glass Fine Ice
Juice of 1/2 Lime
1/2 Jigger Grenadine
1 ” Bacardi Rum
Shake extra well and strain

1971 Anonymus: Tropical Recipes. Standard Recipes. Cuban Cocktail.

(Stir)
Cocktail Glass (Chill)
Mixing Glass, 2 Cubes Ice
1/2 Jigger Apricot Brandy
1/2 Jigger Gin
1 ” Rum
Stir and strain

1971 Anonymus: Tropical Recipes. Standard Recipes. Daiquiri Cocktail.

(Shake)
Cocktail Glass (Chill)
Mixing Glass, Fine Ice
Juice of 1/2 Lime
1/2 Jigger Simple Syrup or
1/2 Barspoon Sugar
1 Jigger White Rum

1971 Anonymus: Tropical Recipes. Standard Recipes. Daiquiri Cocktail (Frozen).

Use Electric Mixer, if
available
Saucer type Champagne Glass
(Chill)
Mixing Glass Fine Crushed ice
Juice of 1/2 Lime
1/2 Jigger Simple Syrup or
1/2 Barspoon Sugar
1 Jigger White Rum
Shake extra well and pour
unstrained into glass
Decorate with Red Cherry
on Top
Serve with short straws
through ice.

1972 Anonymus: Recipes – Wines and Spirits. Seite 28. Bacardi.

To make 1 cocktail
1 teaspoon grenadine
3 ounces light Bacardi rum
1 ounce fresh lime juice
3 to 4 ice cubes
A 4-ounce cocktail glass, chilled
Combine the grenadine, rum, lime juice and ice cubes in a mixing glass.
Place a shaker on top of the mixing glass and, grasping them firmly to­
gether with both hands, shake vigorously. Remove the shaker, place a
strainer over the mixing glass, and pour into a cocktail glass.

1972 Anonymus: Recipes – Wines and Spirits. Seite 29. Daiquiri.

To make 1 cocktail
3/4 ounce fresh lime juice
1 teaspoon superfine sugar
1 teaspoon Cointreau or Triple Sec
3 ounces light rum
3 to 4 ice cubes
Egg white (optional)
A 4-ounce cocktail glass, chilled
Combine the lime juice and sugar in a mixing glass and stir with a bar
spoon to dissolve the sugar. Now add the Cointreau or Triple Sec, rum
and ice. Place a shaker on top of the mixing glass and, grasping them firm­-
ly together with both hands, shake vigorously. Remove the shaker, place
a strainer on top of the mixing glass, and pour into a cocktail glass.
To make your Daiquiri even foamier, try adding just a dash of egg
white to the mixing glass before shaking.

1972 Anonymus: Recipes – Wines and Spirits. Seite 29. Frozen Daiquiri.

To make 1 cocktail
2 ounces fresh lime juice
1 teaspoon superfine sugar
1 teaspoon Cointreau or Triple Sec
3 ounces light rum
6 ounces shaved or cracked ice
A short straw
An 8-ounce wine glass, chilled
Combine the lime juice, sugar, Cointreau or Triple Sec, rum and ice in an
electric blender, and blend for 20 seconds at medium speed. Pour the con­-
tents of the container, unstrained, into a large wine glass, and serve with
a short straw.

1972 Leo Cotton: Old Mr. Boston. Seite 29. Cuban Cocktail No. 1.

Juice of 1/2 Lime
1/2 Teaspoon Powdered Sugar
2 oz. Old Mr. Boston Imported
Rum
Shake well with cracked ice and
strain into 3 oz. cocktail glass.

1972 Leo Cotton: Old Mr. Boston. Seite 30. Daiquiri Cocktail.

Juice 1 Lime
1 Teaspoon Powdered Sugar
1 1/2 oz. Old Mr. Boston Imported
Rum
Shake well with cracked ice and
strain into 3 oz. cocktail glass.

1972 Leo Cotton: Old Mr. Boston. Seite 39. Frozen Daiquiri Cocktail.

Juice 1 Lime
1 Teaspoon Powdered Sugar
2 oz. Old Mr. Boston Imported
Rum
Agitate in electric mixer filled with
shaved ice for about 2 minutes.
Strain through coarse meshed strain-
er into 6 oz. Champagne glass.

1972 Trader Vic: Trader Vic’s Bartender’s Guide. Seite 142. Anejo Daiquiri.

Juice of 1 lime
1 dash sugar syrup
1 dash maraschino liqueur
1 ounce Bacardi Anejo rum
1 scoop shaved ice
Blend in electric drink mixer. Strain through medium-mesh
kitchen strainer into chilled tiki stem champagne glass or
saucer champagne glass.

1972 Trader Vic: Trader Vic’s Bartender’s Guide. Seite 144. Bacardi Cocktail.

Juice of 1 lime
1 dash grenadine
1 ounce Bacardi light rum
Shake with ice cubes. Strain into chilled tiki stem cocktail
glass or small pilsener glass or cocktail glass.

1972 Trader Vic: Trader Vic’s Bartender’s Guide. Seite 145. Bahama Daiquiri (Banaquiri).

Juice of 1 lime
1 teaspoon bar sugar
1-inch slice of banana
1 dash maraschino liqueur
1 ounce Trader Vic light Puerto Rican rum
1 scoop shaved ice
Blend in electric drink mixer. Strain through medium-mesh
kitchen strainer into chilled tiki stem champagne glass.

1972 Trader Vic: Trader Vic’s Bartender’s Guide. Seite 148. Cuban Cocktail – 1.

1 ounce light Puerto Rican rum
1/2 ounce fresh lime juice
Shake with ice cubes. Strain into chilled cocktail glass.

1972 Trader Vic: Trader Vic’s Bartender’s Guide. Seite 149. Cuban Cocktail – 2.

1 1/2 ounces light Puerto Rican rum
1/2 teaspoon maraschino liqueur
1/2 teaspoon grenadine
1 dash orange bitters
2 drops lemon juice
Shake with ice cubes. Strain into chilled cocktail glass. Add
a twist of lemon peel.

1972 Trader Vic: Trader Vic’s Bartender’s Guide. Seite 149. Cuban Cocktail – 3.

Juice of 1/2 lime or 1/4 lemon
1/2 ounce apricot brandy
1 1/2 ounces brandy
1 teaspoon Jamaica rum
Shake with ice cubes. Strain into chilled cocktail glass.

1972 Trader Vic: Trader Vic’s Bartender’s Guide. Seite 149. Daiquiri Cocktail.

Juice of 1 lime
1 dash sugar syrup
1 dash maraschino liqueur
1 ounce light Puerto Rican rum
Shake with ice cubes. Strain into chilled tiki stem or other
large cocktail glass. Decorate with thin lime slice.

1972 Trader Vic: Trader Vic’s Bartender’s Guide. Seite 150. Daiquiri (Frozen) – 1.

2 ounces light Puerto Rican or Cuban rum
Juice of 1/2 lime
1 teaspoon bar sugar
1 dash maraschino liqueur
Blend with 1/2 scoop shaved ice in electric drink mixer. Pour
into chilled champagne glass.

1972 Trader Vic: Trader Vic’s Bartender’s Guide. Seite 150. Daiquiri (Frozen) – 2.

1 ounce light Puerto Rican rum
Juice of 1 lime
1 dash sugar syrup or grenadine
Blend with 10 ounces shaved ice in electric drink mixer. Pile
up in chilled champagne glass. Serve with short straw.

1972 Trader Vic: Trader Vic’s Bartender’s Guide. Seite 150. Daiquiri Collins.

2 ounces white Puerto Rican rum
1 ounce fresh lime juice
1 teaspoon bar sugar
Club soda
Pour rum, lime juice, and sugar over ice cubes in a highball
glass. Fill glass with soda. Stir gendy.

1972 Trader Vic: Trader Vic’s Bartender’s Guide. Seite 150. Daiquiri on the Rocks.

2 ounces white Puerto Rican rum
Juice of 1 lime
1/2 ounce maraschino liqueur
1 dash sugar syrup
Pour over ice cubes in an old fashioned glass. Stir.

1972 Trader Vic: Trader Vic’s Bartender’s Guide. Seite 154. Frozen Mint Daiquiri.

2 ounces white Puerto Rican rum
1 ounce lime juice
1 ounce white crème de menthe
Blend in electric drink mixer with 1/2 scoop shaved ice for
about 15 seconds. Pour into chilled champagne saucer.

1972 Trader Vic: Trader Vic’s Bartender’s Guide. Seite 154. Frozen Peach Daiquiri.

1 1/2 ounces white Puerto Rican rum
Juice of 1/2 lime
1/2 teaspoon bar sugar
2 dashes curaçao
1/2 fresh ripe freestone peach
Blend in electric drink mixer with 1/2 scoop shaved ice. Pour
into chilled champagne glass.
Variation: Substitute several large ripe strawberries for the
peach.

1972 Trader Vic: Trader Vic’s Bartender’s Guide. Seite 157. Jamaica Daiquiri.

2 ounces white Jamaica rum
1/2 ounce maraschino liqueur
3/4 ounce fresh grapefruit juice
Juice of 1 lime
1 teaspoon rock candy syrup
Blend in electric drink mixer (or in shaker can with mixing
glass) with 1 0 ounces shaved ice. Pour into a large champagne
glass.

1972 Trader Vic: Trader Vic’s Bartender’s Guide. Seite 159. La Florida Daiquiri.

The La Florida Daiquiri that follows is the original for-
mula—the way the drink was originally made by Constantine
in the La Florida Bar in Havana, Cuba.
The fact that I have the formula makes a very interesting
story about how a drink has to be made accurately in order
to taste exactly right.
I went down to Havana twenty years ago to watch this
fellow Constantine make these daiquiris. He had a big pile
of limes before him. And whether he was making a daiquiri
for one person or a hundred people, it made no difference in
his care: He picked out each individual lime, cut it with a
knife, and squeezed it with his fingers to make the drink.
I went home, and made the drink exactly the way
Constantine did — I thought; but my drink didn’t taste right.
Years later, when we opened our bar in Havana, I went down
to Constantine’s bar again; he made the drink again, and
again it had that same wonderful flavor I had remembered.
I went to our bar and made the drink; and again my daiquiri
didn’t taste anything like Constantine’s. That night I lay in
bed and thought and thought about that drink; I imagined
myself working beside Constantine and making the drink,
stage by stage, following every movement of Constantine’s
hands. And then I stumbled onto what made the difference:
I had used a squeezer to squeeze the lime juice, and Con­-
stantine used his fingers. By using his fingers, he got the oil
of the lime into the drink; and that was just enough of the
oil of the lime to give the drink its wonderful bouquet. I went
down to my bar the next day and made a La Florida Daiquiri
that turned out to be exacdy like Constantine’s.
So this points out to you amateur bartenders that if you
have a formula to follow, follow it; if you don’t follow it, you
simply are not going to make the drink right.

LA FLORIDA DAIQUIRI

2 ounces light Puerto Rican rum
1 teaspoon bar sugar
1 teaspoon maraschino liqueur
Juice of lime, hand squeezed
Blend with a scant 1/2 scoop shaved ice in electric drink mixer.
Pour, frappéed, into chilled saucer champagne glass.

1972 Trader Vic: Trader Vic’s Bartender’s Guide. Seite 161. Lichee Nut Daiquiri.

Juice of 1 lime
1 dash maraschino liqueur
1 dash rock candy syrup
1 1/2 ounces light Puerto Rican rum
3 whole canned lichee nuts
Blend in electric drink mixer with 12 ounces shaved ice.
Pour into tiki stem champagne glass or other large saucer
champagne glass.

1972 Trader Vic: Trader Vic’s Bartender’s Guide. Seite 164. Mango Daiquiri.

1 lime
1 piece mango
1 dash rock candy syrup
1 dash maraschino liqueur
1 ounce light Puerto Rican rum
Blend thoroughly with 1 scoop shaved ice in electric drink
mixer. Pour into large tiki stem champagne glass.

1972 Trader Vic: Trader Vic’s Bartender’s Guide. Seite 165. Mister Nephew’s Daiquiri.

Juice of 1 lime
1 teaspoon bar sugar
1 dash maraschino liqueur
1 ounce Wray Nephew 15-year special reserve rum
Blend in electric drink mixer with 1 scoop shaved ice. Strain
through medium-mesh kitchen strainer into chilled tiki stem
or other large saucer champagne glass.

1972 Trader Vic: Trader Vic’s Bartender’s Guide. Seite 167. Orange Daiquiri.

1 ounce orange juice
1/2 ounce lime juice
1/2 ounce sugar syrup
1 1/2 ounces white Puerto Rican rum
Blend with 1 scoop shaved ice for 10 to 20 seconds in elec­-
tric drink mixer. Pour into chilled cocktail glass.

1972 Trader Vic: Trader Vic’s Bartender’s Guide. Seite 168. Passion Daiquiri.

1 1/2 ounces white Puerto Rican rum
Juice of 1 lime
1 teaspoon bar sugar
ounce passion fruit nectar
Shake with ice cubes. Strain into chilled cocktail glass.

1972 Trader Vic: Trader Vic’s Bartender’s Guide. Seite 173. Royal Daiquiri (Don The Beachcomber).

1 1/2 ounces white Puerto Rican rum
1/2 ounce lime juice
1/2 ounce parfait amour
1/4 teaspoon bar sugar
Blend in electric drink mixer with 1/2 scoop shaved ice for 10
to 20 seconds. Pour into a 6-ounce champagne glass.

1972 Trader Vic: Trader Vic’s Bartender’s Guide. Seite 188. Trader Vic Daiquiri.

1 lime
1 teaspoon bar sugar
1/4 teaspoon frozen Florida grapefruit juice concentrate,
undiluted
1/2 ounce Garnier maraschino
2 ounces light Puerto Rican rum
Finger squeeze lime juice over 1 scoops shaved ice in con­-
tainer of electric drink mixer. Add remaining ingredients.
Blend. Strain through medium-mesh kitchen strainer into
chilled tiki stem champagne glass.

1973 Anonymus: 500 Ways to Mix Drinks. Seite 30. Bacardi Cocktail.

1 jigger Bacardi or light rum
1/2 teaspoon grenadine
1/2 juice of a lime
Shake well with ice and strain
into cocktail glass.

1973 Anonymus: 500 Ways to Mix Drinks. Seite 35. Cuban Cocktail.

1 pony apricot liqueur
1 jigger light rum
1/2 juice of a lime
Shake well with ice and strain
into cocktail glass.

1973 Anonymus: 500 Ways to Mix Drinks. Seite 35. Daiquiri Cocktail.

2 jiggers Cuban rum
2/3 teaspoon curaçao
1 teaspoon orange juice
1 teaspoon powdered sugar
1/2 juice of a lemon or juice of
1 lime
Shake well with ice and strain
into cocktail glass.

1973 Anonymus: 500 Ways to Mix Drinks. Seite 57. Bacardi.

2 jiggers white rum
1 pony lime juice
1 teaspoon grenadine
3 ice cubes
Blend for 10 seconds, strain
into chilled cocktail glasses.

1973 Anonymus: 500 Ways to Mix Drinks. Seite 58. Daiquiri.

2 jiggers white rum
1 pony lime juice
2 teaspoons sugar syrup
3 ice cubes
Blend for 10 seconds, strain
into chilled cocktail glasses.
For a real treat substitute
Falernum for the sugar syrup.

1973 Anonymus: 500 Ways to Mix Drinks. Seite 58. Frozen Daiquiri.

Chill blender . . . then add . . .
2 jiggers white rum
2 teaspoons sugar
3 teaspoons lime juice
2 dashes maraschino
8 ice cubes
Blend for one minute or until
mixture has consistency of
snow. Strain out any remain­
ing large particles and serve
in saucer champagne glasses.

1973 Oscar Haimo: Cocktail and Wine Digest. Seite 35. Bacardi Cocktail.

Juice of 1/2 Lime, 4 dashes Grenadine or 1/2 tsp. Sugar
2 oz. Bacardi Rum. Shake well with Ice and Strain.

1973 Oscar Haimo: Cocktail and Wine Digest. Seite 49. Daiquiri Cocktail.

Juice of 1/2 Lime, 1/2 tsp. Sugar
2 oz. Rum (White label)
Shake well with finely chipped Ice and Strain.

1973 Oscar Haimo: Cocktail and Wine Digest. Seite 49. Daiquiri Frozen.

Same as Daiquiri Cocktail, add 4 dashes of Maraschino
2 scoops Shaved Ice in electric mixer.
Serve unstrained in Champagne glass with short straws.

1976 Anonymus: International Guide to Drinks. Seite 44. Bacardi.

3/4 white rum
1/4 fresh lime or lemon juice
1/2 teaspoonful of Grenadine
Shaker

1976 Anonymus: International Guide to Drinks. Seite 49. Cuban.

1/2 brandy
1/4 apricot brandy
1/4 fresh lime juice
Shaker

1976 Anonymus: International Guide to Drinks. Seite 49. Daiquiri.

3/4 white rum
1/4 fresh lime or lemon juice
3 dashes gomme syrup
Shaker

1976 Anonymus: International Guide to Drinks. Seite 98. Frozen Daiquiri.

Use champagne glass. Juice of
lime or lemon, 1/2 teaspoonful
gomme syrup, 1 measure
white rum, dash of maraschino
into blender with crushed ice.
Serve unstrained with short
straws.

1976 Brian F. Rea – Brian’s Booze Guide. Seite 37. Bacardi.

Blend/strain into pre-chilled cocktail glass
1 1/2 ounces Bacardi Rum
1 1/2 ounces sweet and sour
172 ounce Grenadine

1976 Brian F. Rea – Brian’s Booze Guide. Seite 46. Daiquiri.

Blend/strain into pre-chilled cocktail glass
1 1/2 ounces light Rum
2 ounces lime juice
1 teaspoon sugar
If lime juice is unavailable, replace that and the
sugar with 2 ounces of sweet and sour.

1976 Brian F. Rea – Brian’s Booze Guide. Seite 51. Frozen Daiquiri.

Fill blender container 3/4 high with shaved ice. Then add
the following in this order:
1 1/2 ounces Rum
1 1/2 ounces sweet and sour
1 heaping teaspoon sugar

1976 Harry Craddock: The Savoy Cocktail Book. Seite 25. Bacardi Cocktail.

1/4 Lemon Juice or Lime
Juice.
1/4 Grenadine.
1/2 Bacardi Rum.
Shake well and strain into
cocktail glass.

1976 Harry Craddock: The Savoy Cocktail Book. Seite 53. Cuban Cocktail (No. 1.).

The Juice of 1/4 Lemon.
1 Teaspoonful
Powdered
Sugar.
1 Glass Rum.
Shake well and strain into
cocktail glass.

1976 Harry Craddock: The Savoy Cocktail Book. Seite 53. Cuban Cocktail (No. 2.).

The Juice of 1/2 Lime or 1/4
Lemon.
1/3 Apricot Brandy.
2/3 Brandy.
Shake well and strain into
cocktail glass.

1976 Harry Craddock: The Savoy Cocktail Book. Seite 54. Daiquiri Cocktail.

The Juice of 1/4 Lemon or
1/2 Lime.
1 Teaspoonful
Powdered
Sugar.
1 Glass Rum.
Shake well and strain into
cocktail glass.

1976 Harry Craddock: The Savoy Cocktail Book. Seite 55. Daiquiri (Frozen).

2 Jiggers Light Rum.
1 Tablespoon Lime or
Lemon Juice.
2 Teaspoons Powdered
Sugar.
Place 2 cups shaved ice in a
blender. Add
ingredients
and blend until consistency
of snow. Serve immediately
with straw.

1977 Stan Jones: Jones’ Complete Barguide. Seite 184. Bacardi Cocktail.

Obviously named after the well known rum which dates back to the early
1860’s when Don Facundo Bacardi began to produce on a commercial basis a rum that he had
for a long time been making for himself and a few friends. Don Facundo purchased a small
distillery along with a storage shed in which some “fruit” bats had made their home. The shed
is no longer there but the bats can be found on the label of every bottle of Bacardi rum. The
Bacardi Cocktail had its day in court in 1936 when the Bacardi Company successfully
defended their drink (which dated back to the 1800’s) in the New York Supreme Court. The
Bacardi company contended that many bars and restaurants were serving a “Bacardi” cocktail
made with rums other than Bacardi and that the use of any rums except Bacardi was a
misrepresentation. The Court agreed and the Bacardi Cocktail was legally recognized, to be
made exclusively with Bacardi rum.

Shake or blend 1 1/2 oz Bacardi rum
3/4 oz fresh lime juice
1/4 to 1/2 oz grenadine.

1977 Stan Jones: Jones’ Complete Barguide. Seite 187. Daiquiri.

Named after some copper mines outside of Santiago, Cuba where an enterprising
engineer by the name of Jennings Cox was working. The mines themselves had been named for
a nearby hamlet. When Cox wanted to treat some visitors to a special drink he mixed up some
local rum with lime juice and sugar and his guests, delighted with the drink, naturally
christened it “Daiquiri.” To give you an idea of how the histories of drinks (or any history for
that matter) can be lost or mixed up, the Daiquiri mines have been variously described as iron
mines, nickel mines, as well as copper mines, 1890’s to the early 1900’s. Such is history.

cocktail glass shake/blend
1 1/2 oz rum For some interesting variations use
3/4 oz lime juice different sweetening agents in place of
1/2 tsp sugar the sugar such as Orange curaçao,
. falernum, orgeat, etc.

1977 Stan Jones: Jones’ Complete Barguide. Seite 221. Bacardi.

Cocktail Glass Shake
1 oz lime juice
1-1/2 oz Bacardi rum, light
1/2 tsp sugar
1/4 oz grenadine

1977 Stan Jones: Jones’ Complete Barguide. Seite 262. Cuban Cocktail.

Cocktail Glass Shake
1-1/2 oz rum
3/4 oz lime (or lemon) juice
3/4 tsp sugar

Variation
1-1/2 oz brandy
1/2 oz apricot flavored brandy
1/2 ox rum (optional)
1/2 oz lime (or lemon) juice

Variation
Lemon twist, Cherry
1-1/2 oz Bacardi rum, light
1/2 oz maraschino liqueur
1/4 oz grenadine
1 dash orange bitters
1/2 oz lemon juice

Variation
1-1/2 oz Bacardi rum, light
1/2 oz sweet vermouth
1 dash Angostura bitters
1/2 oz orange juice

Variation

1 oz rum
1 oz apricot flavored brandy
1/2 oz lime juice

Variation Cocktail Glass
1 oz apricot flavored brandy
1/2 oz grenadine
3/4 oz lime juice
1/4 oz rum

Variation
1-1/2 oz Bacardi rum, light
1-1/2 oz pineapple juice
1/4 oz grenadine
1/4 oz maraschino liqueur

1977 Stan Jones: Jones’ Complete Barguide. Seite 266. Daiquiri.

Cocktail Glass Shake
1-1/2 oz rum
1 oz lime juice
1 tsp sugar

Variation
1-1/2 oz rum
3/4 oz lime juice
1/2 oz orange curaçao
1/4 tsp sugar

1977 Stan Jones: Jones’ Complete Barguide. Seite 285. Frozen Daiquiri.

Large Cocktail Glass Blend
1-1/2 oz lime juice
1 tsp sugar
2 oz rum
Blend with lots of crushed ice
Build into snow cone
Float grenadine
Cherry

As with ail “FROZEN” drinks,
use Osterizer type blender and
plenty of crushed ice.

Variations
Use different rums and floats,
i.e. 1 oz light rum in drink &
float 1 oz dark rum on top or
1/2 oz 151 rum, or – etc, etc.

1979 Fred Powell: The Bartender’s Standard Manual. Seite 26. Daiquiri Banana.

1 1/2 jigger Rum
Juice of 1/2 Lime
1/2 oz. Banana Liqueur
(or one teaspoon sugar)
1/2 ripe banana
Blend with cracked ice.

1979 Fred Powell: The Bartender’s Standard Manual. Seite 26. Daiquiri (Frozen).

1 jigger Light Rum
1 Tablespoon Lime or
Lemon Juice
2 Teaspoons Powdered
Sugar
Blend 2 cups shaved ice with
ingredients until consistency
of snow. Serve with straw.

1979 Fred Powell: The Bartender’s Standard Manual. Seite 26. Daiquiri De Luxe.

1 jigger Orgeat or Creme
d’Ananas
1 1/2 jigger Citrus Juice of
Large Lemon and three
Large Limes
3 jiggers Cuban White Label
Bacardi or Havana Club
Rum

1979 Fred Powell: The Bartender’s Standard Manual. Seite 27. Daiquiri Nacional.

1 jigger White Label Rum
1 jigger Arpicot Brandy
1/2 Lime
1 Teaspoon Sugar
Blend with cracked ice.

1979 Fred Powell: The Bartender’s Standard Manual. Seite 27. Daiquiri Peach.

1 jigger Rum
Juice of 1/2 Lime
1/3 jigger Peach Liqueur
2 Canned peach halves
Blend with cracked ice.

1980 Anonymus: Manual del bar. Seite 130. Daiquiri.

. 60 gramos de ron blanco
Batido. 10 gramos de jugo de limón
Copa de cóctel. 1 cucharadita de azúcar
. impalpable.

1980 Anonymus: Manual del bar. Seite 132. Frozen Daiquiri.

. 60 gramos de ron blanco
Copa tipo champagne, El jugo de 1/2 limón
ancha. 1 cucharadita de azúcar im-
. palpable.
. Batido en batidora eléctrica
. 15 segundos aproximada-
. mente, con dos cuchara-·
. das de hielo granizado,
. ocasionalmente se le agre-
. gan dos gotas de marras-
. quino.
. Este cóctel necesita ser rea-
. lizado en el menor tiempo
. posible, con las bebidas y
. su copa previamente en-
. friados, incluso el reci-
. piente de la batidora. Se
. sirve con hielo granizado
. y pajitas cortas.

2010 Colin Peter Field: The Ritz Paris. Seite 31. Daiquiri. 6/10 Bacardi rum; 3/10 lime juice; 1/10 Sugar syrup.

2010 Jason Kosmas & Dushan Zaric: Speakeasy. Seite 98. Daiquiri. 2 1/2 ounces Flor de Caña four-year-old rum; 1 ounce lime juice; 3/4 ounce simple syrup; garnish: 1 lime wheel.

2011 Helmut Adam, Jens Hasenbein, Bastian Heuser: Cocktailian 1. Seite 391. Daiquiri. 6 cl weißer Rum; 3 cl Limettensaft; 2 cl Zuckersirup (2:1). Garnitur: Limettenzeste.

2011 Helmut Adam, Jens Hasenbein, Bastian Heuser: Cocktailian 2. Seite 189. Daiquiri. 6 cl weißer Rum; 3 cl Limettensaft; 2 cl Zuckersirup (2:1). Garnitur: Limettenzeste.

2011 Jim Meehan: Das Geheime Cocktail-Buch. Seite 103. Daiquiri. 6 cl Banks 5 Island Rum; 2 cl Limettensaft; 2 cl Zuckersirup; Garnitur: Limettenscheibe.

2012 Tom Sandham: World’s Best Cocktails. Seite 143. Daiquiri No. 1. 60 ml white Rum; juice 1/2 lime; 1 tsp. superfine sugar; garnish: lime wedge.

2013 Tristan Stephenson: The Curious Bartender. Seite 161. Daiquiri. 50 ml Bacardi Superior Rum; 12,5 ml lime juice; 7,5 ml sugar syrup; 5 ml water; ganrish: lime wedge.

2013 Victoria Bar: Die Schule der Trunkenheit. Seite 246. Daiquiri. 5 cl white Cuban rum; 2-3 cl Limette; 1,5 cl Rohrzucker-Sirup.

2014 Dave Arnold: Liquid Intelligence. Seite 134. Daiquiri. 60 ml white rum; 22,5 ml lime juice; 22,5 ml simple syrup.

2014 David Kaplan, Nick Fauchald, Alex Day: Death & Co. Seite 141. Daiquiri. 2 ounces Flor de Caña extra-dry white rum; 1 ounce lime juice; 1/2 ounce cane sugar syrup; garnish: 1 lime wedge.

2015 Duggan McDonnell: Drinking the devil’s acre. Seite 177. Daiquiri. 60 ml Bacardi Superior white rum; 30 ml lime juice; 20 ml Cocktail Syrup.

2016 André Darlington & Tenaya Darlington: The New Cocktail Hour. Seite 108. Daiquiri. 60 ml light rum (Flor de Caña 4 Yr); 30 ml lime juice; 15 ml simple syrup; garnish: lime wheel.

2016 Jamie Boudreau & James O. Fraioli: The Canon Cocktail Book. Seite 87. Daiquiri. 2 ounces white rum; 3/4 ounce lime juice; 1/2 ounce simple syrup; garnish: lime wedge.

2016 Martin Cate & Rebecca Cate: Smuggler’s Cove. Seite 168. Daiquiri No. 1. 3/4 ounce lime juice; 1/2 ounce SC Demerara syrup; 2 ounces blended lightly aged rum.

2016 Sasha Petraske: Regarding Cocktails. Seite 95. Daiquiri. 30 ml lime juice; 22 ml Simple Syrup; 60 ml white rum.

2017 Gary Regan: The Joy of Mixology. Seite 179. Bacardi Cocktail. 1 1/2 ounces Bacardi light rum; 3/4 ounce grenadine; 1/2 ounce lime juice.

2017 Gary Regan: The Joy of Mixology. Seite 203. Daiquiri. 2 ounces light rum; 1 ounce lime juice; 1/2 ounce simple syrup; garnish: 1 lime wedge.

2017 Jim Meehan: Meehan’s Bartender Manual. Seite 262. Daiquiri. 2 oz. Bacardi Heritage white rum; 0,75 oz. lime juice; 0,75 oz. simple syrup; garnish: 1 lime wheel.

2018 Alex Day, Nick Fauchald, David Kaplan: Cocktail Codex. Seite 119. Daiquiri. 2 ounces Caña Brava white rum; 3/4 ounce lime juice; 3/4 ounce simple syrup.

explicit capitulum
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About

Hi, I'm Armin and in my spare time I want to promote bar culture as a blogger, freelance journalist and Bildungstrinker (you want to know what the latter is? Then check out "About us"). My focus is on researching the history of mixed drinks. If I have ever left out a source you know of, and you think it should be considered, I look forward to hearing about it from you to learn something new. English is not my first language, but I hope that the translated texts are easy to understand. If there is any incomprehensibility, please let me know so that I can improve it.

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