Drinks

Brooklyn Cocktail

Brooklyn Cocktail.

The Brooklyn Cocktail is a tasty variation of the Manhattan Cocktail. It shows how small changes can create something new.

30 ml Jack Daniels Rye
30 ml Moot vermouth
5 ml Schladerer Maraschino
5 ml Amer Picon

Preparation: Stirred.

The Brooklyn Cocktail first appears in 1908, in Jacob Abraham Grohusko’s book “Jack’s Manual”. The Dean Cocktail is also listed in the same book, with an identical recipe. However, in the course of time, the name Dean Cocktail did not become established. It should also be noted that other drinks are rarely referred to as Brooklyn cocktails. We can ignore these, however, as they do not have the oldest naming rights and are also very rare.

The Brooklyn Cocktail must be considered a variation of the Manhattan Cocktail. If you follow the classification from our Manhattan post. The latter is prepared with whiskey, Italian vermouth, curaçao or maraschino and a bitter. The variation of the Brooklyn Cocktail is that a lemon zest – which would be optional in the Manhattan Cocktail – is omitted and the bitter is not a usual bitter like Angostura Bitters or orange bitters. Rather, the bitter notes are added with the Amer Picon.

But as an analysis of the recipes shows, this only applies until the beginning of Prohibition. After that, some of the original ingredients are omitted, especially picon, but also maraschino or even whiskey. Instead, other ingredients are added, such as bitters, lemon zest, orange zest or cherries, or other ingredients such as grenadine, Campari or gin are used.

Brooklyn Cocktail - Ingredients.
Brooklyn Cocktail – Ingredients.

Whereas up to Prohibition a rye whiskey was used exclusively, from 1920 onwards simply whiskey was also suggested, and from 1960 onwards explicitly bourbon as well.

Brooklyn Cocktail - Whiskey.
Brooklyn Cocktail – Whiskey.

The Brooklyn Cocktail, like the Manhattan Cocktail, is a good example of how drinks have become drier over time. On the one hand, this can be seen in the type of vermouth used. Up to Prohibition, an Italian vermouth is used in about 75% of the recipes. But from Prohibition onwards, preference is given to a dry French vermouth.

Brooklyn Cocktail - Vermouth.
Brooklyn Cocktail – Vermouth.

The ratio between whiskey and vermouth is also interesting. Until the beginning of Prohibition, the ratio was 1:1, but it rose steadily and reached its peak from 1960 onwards at almost 3:1.

Brooklyn Cocktail - Ratio Whiskey to Vermouth.
Brooklyn Cocktail – Ratio Whiskey to Vermouth.

What is the reason for this? To answer this question, it is useful to look at the history of vermouth in the United States.

The history of vermouth in the United States

19th century

One reads again and again that in the course of time not only the Martini Cocktail has become drier and drier, and that the Second World War represents a caesura in this respect. It is therefore appropriate to look into the history of vermouth consumption in this context and to critically examine the statements that are generally disseminated.

Since the United States is the nucleus of cocktail culture, we have to start there. Initially, vermouth was only available in a few places and in small quantities. [1-79] It was first sold in pharmacies in the USA as a medicine. It did not come into use in bars until later, and so vermouth was considered a novelty until the 1860s. [1-79f]

Vermouth has been available there since about 1836. [1-79] As early as 1838, Cora exported its Vermouth di Torino to the USA. [3-58] From 1844, the export of Noilly Prat is documented, with the first shipments going to New Orleans, San Francisco [1-89] [3-55] and New York. [4-135]

In 1853, “The Exhibition of the Industry of All Nations – a World’s Fair” took place in New York. Italian vermouth producers were also represented there in the Crystal Palace. [1-80f]

Martini & Rossi exported its vermouth to the USA from 1868, [1-89] [3-60] but it is also stated in 1867. [4-135] [5-297] It is interesting to look at its market share. In 1868 they exported 100 cases for the first time. [1-89] Between 1867 and 1889 it was 612,000 litres, between 1890 and 1910 as much as 15,024,277 litres. As early as 1877, 3/4 of the vermouth exported to the USA was Martini & Rossi vermouth. [5-297]

Start of vermouth production in the USA

Since the turn of the century, vermouth has also been produced in the USA. As examples, one can mention the William H. Hazen Company from New York State from 1894 onwards. In 1914, another producer was established in this state. A producer is known from Cleveland in Ohio, and vermouth was also produced in California before the turn of the century. [1-90] However, imported goods were preferred by consumers. The local products could not really gain a foothold. [1-90]

Prohibition

With Prohibition, many things changed. Martini & Rossi adjusted to Prohibition and shipped a non-alcoholic vermouth at this time. [1-105]

Adam Ford says that during Prohibition, vermouth was probably not bootlegged or smuggled. We do read that vermouth was also confiscated during this time, but – according to Adam Ford – it was not used significantly. [1-105] Unfortunately, he does not provide any evidence for this statement. Adam Ford states that since the 1940s Martini Cocktails and Manhattan Cocktails were demanded and prepared drier, i.e. with an ever decreasing vermouth content. [1-76] As evidence for his thesis, he quotes a newspaper article in the Sun according to which European vermouth was too sweet for American tastes, which is why less of it was used. [1-106]

In any case, vermouth seems to have been scarcely available during Prohibition. A contemporary report states: „Under this title we will lightly touch on the sub­ject of cocktail construction in these days of a limited available selection. As far as we know there is no satisfactory substitute for either French or Italian Vermouth and its importation is so small that it is practically crossed from off our American repertoire. The Vermouth without alcohol contents as sold by dealers lacks characteristic flavor and the new flavor is not likely to become very popular. Vermouth, with bitters, syrups and spirits, formed the basis of most of our cocktails and our comfort is often disordered by having to substitute fruit juices which cause indigestion in varying degree to most people. Vermouth is a perfectly palatable potable, so much so that many gouty persons sip a little of it every day without trouble. An alcoholic content of 15 % to 17% is probably essential to bring out the resulting flavor after two year’s storage in casks exposed to the sun. We certainly miss very keenly the dry sugarless quality of the French article and the sweeter flavor of the Italian, as well as the delicious flavor which was sometimes created by mixing the two Vermouths with spirits.“ [6]

After Prohibition and during the Second World War

Immediately after Prohibition, the quality of American vermouth was poor. [1-107]

In 1940, taxes on domestic American vermouth were reduced so that vermouth was taxed the same regardless of its origin. [1-107] By 1941, American vermouth was the fastest growing product in the American wine trade. [1-107]

Under the Vichy government of Nazi-occupied France, the production, sale and consumption of vermouth was banned in 1940. Only production for export was permitted. [2-120] Nevertheless, there were no American imports of French and Italian vermouth during World War II. [1-107] Although Martini & Rossi began shipping through Spain and Argentina, because there was sentiment against Italian and French products in the US, they refrained from using these products there. Imports collapsed dramatically. [1-107] The existing demand for vermouth was met by American producers. [1-108] Around 1945, there were more than 70 vermouth producers in California and more than 116 in New York. These two states produced 94% of the vermouth produced in the USA. [1-109]

It is said that Winston Churchill, when preparing his Martini cocktail, merely took French vermouth in his hand and bowed once towards France instead of adding it to his Martini cocktail. It is said that this happened because he did not know when he would be able to get another bottle. [2-121]

It is also reported that with the beginning of the Second World War, the Martini Cocktail basically became bone dry, as there was practically no import of vermouth from Italy and France and the export of the same had practically come to a standstill. The bottles that were still available had become too old and sour, and so people began to stop adding [!] vermouth to the Martini cocktail. Those who nevertheless insisted on vermouth would have adjusted the vermouth content. As an example, the British Field Marshal Bernard Montgomery is mentioned, who prepared his Martini Cocktail with a ratio of twelve parts gin to one part vermouth. [3-205]

After the Second World War

After the Second World War, American drinking habits changed. People drank more and in larger quantities. People began to demand Martini Cocktails with just a drop of vermouth. [1-110] The Montgomery Martini is cited as an example, with a 15:1 ratio. [1-111] In 1954, the tax law was changed. It was now allowed to sell pre-mixed Martini cocktails in bottles with a ratio of 5:1, previously it was a maximum of 3:1. [1-111]

Until the mid-1960s, cheaper and cheaper vermouth was produced. Whereas muscat wine used to be used, cheap, young and neutral-tasting wines were taken instead. Both American and European producers produced continually cheaper vermouth with less soul and less flavour. [1-113]

Critical reflection

We have doubts about what has been said before, because an analysis of the recipes provides a different picture. Prohibition and the Second World War did not have the influence as it is presented.

So against this background, let’s look again at the Brooklyn Cocktail. It became drier and drier during Prohibition, the Second World War and afterwards, because more French vermouth was used. The proportion of whiskey also increased, but not abruptly. The ratio of whiskey to vermouth rose from 1 to about 1.5 by the time the USA entered the Second World War. Between 1941 and 1951, the ratio was about 2. Only from 1960 onwards is it close to 3. So it seems that, at least for the Brooklyn Cocktail, the fundamentally deteriorating quality of vermouth has been the reason for its reduced use. The availability of vermouth during Prohibition and the World War seems to have had only a minor influence.

In this context, we also took another look at the Manhattan Cocktail to see if anything similar could be observed there and therefore divided the period between 1941 and 1999 into two sections. The result is this:

Manhattan Cocktail - Vermouth.
Manhattan Cocktail – Vermouth.

Surprisingly, Italian vermouth was always predominantly used. Thus, the Manhattan Cocktail presents a different picture than the Brooklyn Cocktail.

Manhattan Cocktail - Average ratio of whiskey to vermouth.
Manhattan Cocktail – Average ratio of whiskey to vermouth.

The ratio of whiskey to vermouth is similar to that of the Brooklyn Cocktail. Before Prohibition, it shows a ratio of about 1 (Brooklyn Cocktail: 1). During Prohibition until the USA’s entry into the Second World War, it is about 1.25 (Brooklyn Cocktail: 1.5). By 1959, the ratio rises almost to 2 (Brooklyn Cocktail: 2), and after 1960 to 2.25 (Brooklyn Cocktail: 3). The Manhattan Cocktail thus becomes less dry than the Brooklyn Cocktail.

One must therefore conclude that the arguments presented in the literature for the dramatic increase in the dryness of drinks cannot be classified as fundamentally wrong. Nevertheless, the effects are less dramatic than generally described. Prohibition shows only a minor influence on recipes, as does the Second World War. So we can assume that vermouth must have been very much available at the time, or at least that people only prepared a Manhattan or Brooklyn cocktail if they had vermouth available. There is no evidence of an omission of vermouth or a dramatic reduction of it. Rather, it is interesting that after 1960, the vermouth content is further reduced. The reason for this may really be that the quality of the available vermouth deteriorated considerably and the proportion of spirits therefore had to be increased in order to be able to prepare a reasonably balanced cocktail.

So one may regard the stories and examples put forward as extremes and also with some doubt. Why, for example, could Winston Churchill not have obtained vermouth? He certainly had contacts to obtain Italian, French or even American vermouth as a supply. Montgomery, with his extremely gin-heavy Martini, may have preferred it, but it will not have been the norm. The Martinis with only one drop of vermouth, which according to David Embury were strongly preferred, also seem to be rather a marginal phenomenon – otherwise these mixing ratios would also have been reflected in the recipe collections. The fact that people in America seem to have lost their preference for sweets is also not very convincing as an argument on the same grounds.

It will be interesting to do the same analysis for the Martini Cocktail. We will report on this.

Sources
  1. Adam Ford: Vermouth. The revival of the spirit that created America’s cocktail culture. ISBN 978-1-58157-296-4. Neq York, The Countryman Press, 2015.
  2. Anistatia R. Miller & Jarred M. Brown: Shaken not Stirred. A Celebration of the Martini. ISBN 978-0-06-213026-6. New York, Harper Collins, 2013.
  3. Mixeallany Guide to Vermouth
  4. Anistatia Miller & Jared Brown: Spirituous Journey. A History of Drink. Book Two: From Publicans to Master Mixologists. First Edition, Mixellany Limited, London, 2009. ISBN 0-9781907434-06-8. Page 229.
  5. Gaz Regan: The Bartender’s Gin Compendium. ISBN 978-1-4415-4688-3. 2009.
  6. Anonymus: Life and Letters of Henry William Thomas, Mixologist. 2. edition. Ohne Ort, Privatdruck, 1929.
Brooklyn Cocktail.
Brooklyn Cocktail.

Historical recipes

1908 Jacob Abraham Grohusko: Jack’s Manual. Seite 22. Brooklyn Cocktail.

1 dash Amer. Picon bitters
1 dash Maraschino
50% rye whiskey
50% Bailor Vermouth
Fill glass with ice.
Stir and strain. Serve.

1908 Jacob Abraham Grohusko: Jack’s Manual. Seite 27. Dean Cocktail.

1 dash Amer. Picon
1 dash Maraschino
50% Bailor Vermouth
50% rye whiskey
Fill glass with ice.
Stir, strain in glass and
serve.

1910 Omaha Daily Bee, 12. September 1910, Seite 4, Around New York. Brooklyn Cocktail. https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn99021999/1910-09-12/ed-1/seq-4/#date1=1789&sort=date&date2=1963&words=Brooklyn+cocktail&searchType=basic&sequence=0&index=14&state=&rows=20&proxtext=%22brooklyn+CocktaiL%22&y=0&x=0&dateFilterType=yearRange&page=1

The disturbance of the nerve centers of
New York by Colonel Roosevelt’s rewlnnlng
of the west brought quickly from belfry of
genius a Bpecilio of great power and com-
fort. The Inventor Is Henry Wellington
Wack, the same who championed Dr. Cook
for the regulation legal fee. Mr. Wack
salutes his work of art, “the Brooklyn
cocktail,” In these words: “The Brooklyn
Is the nearest approach to the ambrosial
nectar of the gods that the magical com-
pounder of liquid, ventricular Inspiration
has so far produced for the gustatory grati-
fication of mankind. It fits the throat like
a velvet flame and pumps Into one’s stom-
ach with a merry laugh. It sharpens the
appetite and the wit and dulls the edge
of malice. It sends worry scampering down
the alley of the past. When the Brooklyn
becomes our national drink, rlches and
poverty will dance a can-can on the grave
of trouble.”
Here Is the recipe:
“Three part gin, one part French and
one part Italian vermouth, one-half or one
third raspberry syrup. Embalm in a shaker
of cracked Ice and shalte the very life Into
It. Serve repeatedly, smoklng cold.”

1910 Jacob Abraham Grohusko: Jack’s Manual. Seite 31. Brooklyn Cocktail.

1 dash Amer. Picon bitters
1 dash Maraschino
50% rye whiskey
50% Italian Vermouth
Fill glass with ice.
Stir and strain. Serve.

1910 Jacob Abraham Grohusko: Jack’s Manual. Seite 40. Dean Cocktail.

1 dash Amer. Picon
1 dash Maraschino
50% Italian Vermouth
50% rye whiskey
Fill glass with ice.
Stir, strain in glass and serve.

1913 Jacques Straub: A Complete Manual of Mixed Drinks. Seite 14. Brooklyn Cocktail.

1 Dash Amer Picon.
1 Dash Maraschino.
1/2 Jigger French Vermouth.
1/2 Jigger good Rye Whiskey.
Stir.

1914 Jacques Straub: Drinks. Seite 20. Brooklyn Cocktail.

1 dash Amer Picon.
1 dash maraschino.
1/2 jigger French vermouth.
1/2 jigger good rye whiskey. Stir.

1916 Jacob Abraham Grohusko: Jack’s Manual. Seite 40. Brooklyn Cocktail.

One dash Amer. Picon Bitters
One dash Maraschino
50% Rye whiskey
50% M & R Italian Vermouth
Fill glass with ice.
Stir and strain and serve.

1916 Jacob Abraham Grohusko: Jack’s Manual. Seite 46. Dean Cocktail.

1 dash Picon Bitters
1 dash Maraschino
50% M. & R. Italian Vermouth
50% rye whiskey
Fill glass with ice. Stir, strain in glass and serve.

1920 Anonymus: Metropolitain Club, Washington, D.C., Cocktails. Seite 10. Brooklyn.

One-sixth French Ver-
mouth, one sixth Italian Vermouth,
two-thirds of Whiskey, piece of lemon
peel, Frappe.

1923 Harry McElhone: „Harry“ of Ciro’s ABC of Mixing Cocktails. Seite 17. Brooklyn Cocktail.

1 dash Amer. Picon, 1 dash of Maraschino,
2/3 Rye Whisky, 1/3 French Vermouth.

1926 Harry McElhone: Harry’s ABC of Mixing Cocktails. Seite 27. Brooklyn Cocktail.

1 dash Amer. Picon, 1 dash of Maraschino,
2/3 Canadian Club Whisky, 1/3 French Vermouth.

1927 Anonymus: El arte de hacer un cocktail. Seite 15. Brooklyn.

Gotas de Amer Picón.
Gotas de Marrasquino.
1/2 vermouth francés.
1/2 whiskey americano de calidad.
Bien batido.

1927 Harry McElhone: Barflies and Cocktails. Seite 18. Brooklyn Cocktail.

1 dash Amer Picon, 1 dash of Maraschino, 2/3 Rye
Whisky, 1/3 French Vermouth.

1927 Jean Lupoiu: 370 recettes de cocktails. Seite 16. Brooklyn Cocktail.

1 jet Amer Picon, 1 jet Marasquin, 1/3
Vermouth Noilly Prat, 2/3 Rye Whisky.

1927 Marcel Requien & Lucien Farnoux Reynaud: L’heure du cocktail. Seite 63. Brooklyn.

2 traits Orange Bitter, 1 trait
Marasquin, 2/3 Rye Whisky, 1/3 Vermouth français.
Frapper à la timbale.

1927 Piero Grandi: Cocktails. Seite 28. Brooklyn Cocktail.

Une goutte Amer Picon, 1 goutte de Mara-
schino, 2/3 Rye Whisky, 1/3 Vermouth Fran-
çais.

1928 Pedro Chicote: Cocktails. Brooklyn-Cocktail.

Prepárese en cocktelera:
Hielo picado.
Unas gotas de amer=Picon.
Unas gotas de marrasquino,
1/2 copita de vermut.
1/2 – de whisky.
Agítese y sírvase muy frío en copa de cocktail.

1929 Schürger Rezsö: A Mixer. Seite 13. Brooklyn.

1/6 francia Vermouth, 1/6 olasz Vermouth, 2/3
Whisky, 1 drb narancshéj, keverni.

1930 F. Koki: Cocktails. Brooklyn-Cocktail.

Barglas mit Eis.
1/4 Cocktailglas Amer Picon,
1/4 ” Maraschino,
1/2 ” franz. Vermuth.
Mische gut mit einem Barlöffel, seihe es in ein Cocktailglass, presse
den Saft aus einem Stückchen Zitronenschale darüber und serviere.

1930 Gerardo Corrales: Club de cantineros. Seite 29. Brooklyn Cocktail.

Gotas amer picon.
Gotas marraschino.
1/2 vermouth Francés.
1/2 whiskey Rye bueno. Revuélvase.

1930 Harry Craddock: The Savoy Cocktail Book. Seite 38. Brooklyn Cocktail.

1 Dash Amer Picon.
1 Dash Maraschino.
2/3 Canadian Club Whisky.
1/3 French Vermouth.
Shake well and strain into
cocktail glass.

1930 Harry McElhone: Harry’s ABC of Mixing Cocktails. Seite 27. Brooklyn Cocktail.

1 dash Amer. Picon, 1 dash of Drioli Marasch-
ino, 2/3 Canadian Club Whisky, 1/3 French Vermouth.

1930 Knut W. Sundin: Two Hundred Selected Drinks. Seite 15. Brooklyn Cocktail.

Fill a large bar glass half full of broken
ice and add:
2 dashes of Angostura bitter
2 dashes of Maraschino
1/2 glass of Whisky
1/2 glass of Italian Vermouth.
Stir up well, strain into a cocktad glass and
add a cherry.

1930 Knut W. Sundin: Two Hundred Selected Drinks. Seite 19. Dean Cocktail.

Fill the bar glass half full of broken ice and add:
2 dashes of Angostura bitter
4 dashes of Maraschino
4 dashes of Portwine
1/2 glass Italian Vermouth
1/2 glass of Whisky.
Stir well and strain into a cocktail glass.

1930 Pedro Chicote: Le ley mojada. Seite 114. Brooklyn-Cocktail.

Prepárese en cocktelera:
Hielo picado.
Unas gotas de amer-Picon.
Unas gotas de marrasquino.
1/2 copita de vermut.
1/2 — de whisky.
Agítese y sírvase muy frío en
copa de cocktail.

Brooklyn Cocktail. Pedro Chicote, La ley mojada, 1930, page 114.
Brooklyn Cocktail. Pedro Chicote, La ley mojada, 1930, page 114.

1930 Ridgely Hunt & George S. Chappell: The Saloon in the Home. Seite 20. The Brooklyn.

Two parts Rye whiskey,
One part French Vermouth,
One dash of Orange bitters,
One dash of Grenadine.

1930 William T. Boothby: „Cocktail Bill“ Boothby’s World Drinks. Seite 23. Brooklyn.

Gin . . . . . . . . . . . 1/2 jigger Egg . . . . . . . . . . . . 1/2 of white
It. Vermouth . . . 1/4 jigger Orange . . . . . . . . . 2 dashes
. Nutmeg to taste
Shake well with ice, strain into chilled cocktail glass, grate nutmeg over
and serve.

1931 Dominique Migliorero: L’art du shaker. Seite 15. Brooklyn Cocktail.

2 traits Angostura, 2 traits Marasquino, 1/2 Rye Whisky,
1/2 Vermouth Français.

1931 John: „Happy Days!“. Seite 37. Brooklyn Cocktail.

One dash American Picon Bitters
One dash Maraschino
50 per cent Rye Whiskey
50 per cent M&R Italian Vermouth.
Fill glass with ice, stir, strain and serve.

1932 James A. Wiley – The Art of Mixing. Seite 6. Brooklyn Cocktail.

1 dash Angostura bitters, 1 dash of Maraschino,
2/3 Rye Whiskey, 1/3 French Vermouth.
As usual shake ferociously with ice and —
you’ll know what to do.

1933 Anonymus: O’Dell’s Book of Cocktails and Fancy Drinks. Seite 44. Brooklyn Cocktail.

Dash of Amer Picon, Dash of Maraschino,
2/3 Canadian Club Whisky,
1/3 French Vermouth.

1933 Anonymus: The Bartender’s Friend. Seite 53. Brooklyn Cocktail.

Whiskey, Rye Take equal parts of whiskey and Ver-
Vermouth, Italian mouth, add 2 dashes of bitters, and
Bitters, Angostura some shaved ice. Shake, strain, and
Ice serve.

1933 Antonio Josa: Cocktelera universal. Seite 17. Brooklin Cocktail.

Se prepara en cocktelera con unos peda-
citos de hielo.
1/3 de Gin.
Unas gotas de Amer Picón.
Unas gotas de Maraschino.
2/3 de Whisky Canadian Club.
1/3 de vermouth Francés.

1933 Fred W. Swan: Whenn Good Fellows Get Together. Seite 18. Brooklyn Cocktail.

(use mixing goblet)
1/3 wineglass Grenadine.
1/3 wineglass Jamaica Rum.
1/3 wineglass Italian Vermouth.
Fill mixing goblet with shaved ice. Stir
well and strain into cocktail glass. Twist
a piece orange peel on top, and serve.

1933 George A. Lurie: Here’s How. Seite 16. Brooklyn.

Gin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 pony Egg . . . . . . . . 1/2 of white
It. Vermouth . . . . . 1/4 jigger Orange . . . . . . . . 2 dashes
. Nutmeg . . . . . to taste
Shake well with ice, strain into chilled cocktail glass, grate
nutmeg over and serve.

1933 Harry Craddock: The Savoy Cocktail Book. Seite 38. Brooklyn Cocktail.

1 Dash Amer Picon.
1 Dash Maraschino.
2/3 Canadian Club Whisky.
1/3 French Vermouth.
Shake well and strain into
cocktail glass.

1933 Harry Todd: Mixer’s Guide. Seite 16. Brooklyn Cocktail.

One dash American Picon Bitters.
One dash Maraschino.
One-half jigger Rye Whisky.
One-half jigger Italian Vermouth.
Fill glass with ice, stir, strain and serve.

1933 Jacob Abraham Grohusko: Jack’s Manual. Seite 50. Brooklyn Cocktail.

1 dash Amer Picon bitters
1 dash maraschino
50% rye whisky
50% regular vermouth
Fill glass with ice. Stir and strain and serve.

1933 Jacob Abraham Grohusko: Jack’s Manual. Seite 60. Dean Cocktail.

1 dash Picon bitters
1 dash maraschino
50% regular vermouth
50% rye whisky
Fill glass with ice. Stir, strain into glass, and serve.

1934 Anonymus: A Life-Time Collection of 688 Recipes for Drinks. Seite 17. Brooklyn Cocktail.

1 dash Amer. Picon 1/2 jigger good Rye
1 dash Maraschino Whisky. Stir
1/2 jigger French Vermouth

1934 A. T. Neirath: Rund um die Bar. Seite 162. Brooklyn-Cocktail.

1 D. [Dash] Amer-Picon
1 D. [Dash] Maraschino
1/3 Fran. Vermouth
2/3 Canadian Club-Whisky
M-Gl. [Mischglas] K. [Kirsche] Z. [Zitronenspirale]

1934 G. F. Steele: My New Cocktail Book. Seite 32. Brooklyn.

50% Rye Whiskey
50% Italian Vermouth
dash Amer Picon bitters
dash Maraschino

1934 Harry McElhone: Harry’s ABC of Mixing Cocktails. Seite 31. Brooklyn Cocktail.

1 dash Amer. Picon, 1 dash of Drioli Maraschino,
2/3 “Canadian Club” Whisky, 1/3 French Vermouth.

1934 Patrick Gavin Duffy: The Official Mixer’s Manual [collectic1806]. Seite 108. Brooklyn Cocktail.

1 Dash Amer Picon
1 Dash Maraschino
2/3 Rye Whiskey
1/3 French Vermouth
Stir well in ice and strain.
Use glass number 1

1934 William T. Boothby: „Cocktail Bill“ Boothby’s World Drinks. Seite 35. Brooklyn.

Gin . . . . . . . . . . . . 1/2 jigger Egg . . . . . . . . . 1/2 of white
It. Vermouth . . . . 1/4 jigger Orange . . . . . . 2 dashes
. Nutmeg to taste
Shake well with ice, strain into chilled cocktail glass, grate nutmeg over
and serve.

1934 William T. Boothby: „Cocktail Bill“ Boothby’s World Drinks. Seite 35. Brooklyn No. 2.

Whisky . . . . . . . . . 2/3 jigger Fr. Vermouth . . . . . . . 1/3 jigger
Maraschino . . . . . 1 dash Bitters . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 drops
Shake well with ice, strain into chilled cocktail glass and serve.

1935 Adrian: Cocktail Fashions of 1936. Seite 42. Brooklyn Cocktail.

1/2 shot French vermouth.
1/2 shot dry gin.
2 dashes orange bitters. Stir.

1935 O. Blunier: The Barkeeper’s Golden Book. Seite 85. Brooklyn.

2/3 Rye Whisky
1/3 Italian Vermouth
1 ds. Amer Picon
1 ds. Maraschino

1936 Frank Meier: The Artistry of Mixing Drinks. Seite 26. Brooklyn.

In mixing-glass: a dash of Maras-
chino, half French Vermouth,
half Rye Whiskey; stir well
and serve.

1936 Raymond Porta Mingot: Gran manual de cocktails. Seite 173. Brooklyn Cocktail.

Usese la cocktelera.
Unos pedacitos de hielo.
Una cucharadita de jarabe de Granadina
Fortuny.
6 gotas de Pippermint Get Frères.
1/3 parte de Amer Picon.
1/3 parte de Vermouth Francés Noilly
Prat.
1/3 parte de Dry Gin Sumner’s.
Agítese, cuélese y sírvase en copa de 120
gramos.

1937 R. de Fleury: 1800 – And All That. Seite 40. Brooklyn.

1/2 French Vermouth
1/2 Dry Gin
2 Dashes Orange Bit­-
ters

1937 Salvador Trullos Mateu: Recetario internacional de cock-tails. Seite 86. Brooklyn Cock-Tail.

Gotas amer picon.
Gotas marraschino.
Media parte vermouth CAZALIS &
PRATS.
Media parte whiskey MONT VERNON.
Revuélvase.

1937 United Kingdom Bartender’s Guild. Brooklyn.

1 dash Amer Picon.
1 dash Maraschino.
66 2/3 % Canadian Club Whisky.
33 1/3 % French Vermouth.
Shake and strain into cocktail glass.

1937 William J. Tarling: Café Royal Cocktail Book. Brooklyn.

1 dash Amer Picon.
1 dash Maraschino.
2/3 Canadian Club Whisky.
1/3 Martini Dry Vermouth.
Shake and strain into cocktail glass.

1938 Hyman Gale & Gerald F. Marco: The How and When. Seite 100. Brooklyn Cocktail.

1 dash Amer Picon
1 dash Maraschino
2/3 Whisky
1/3 French Vermouth
Shake well
Strain into Cocktail Glass

1938 Krönlein-Beutel: Das Getränkebuch. Seite 61. Brooklyn.

(65er Cocktailglas)
In ein Mischglas
4—6 Eisstückchen (Walnußgröße)
3 Spritzer Amer Picon 3 ccm
Schuß Maraschino 10 ccm
Whisky 25 ccm
French Vermouth 25 ccm
Kirsche
(bestäuben)

1940 Charles: The Cocktail Book. Seite 43. Brooklyn Cocktail.

1 dash of Amer Picon,
1 dash of maraschino,
1/6 gill of French (or dry Martini) vermouth,
1/3 gill of Canadian Club whisky.
Use the mixing glass.

1940 Patrick Gavin Duffy: The Official Mixer’s Manual. Seite 108. Brooklyn Cocktail.

1 Dash Amer Picon
1 Dash Maraschino
2/3 Rye Whiskey
1/3 French Vermouth
Stir well in ice and strain.
Use glass number 1

1943 Oscar Haimo: Cocktail Digest. Seite 28. Brooklyn Cocktail.

2 oz. Rye
1/2 oz. French Vermouth
1 dash Maraschino
1 dash Amer-Picon
Shake.

1944 Oscar Haimo: Cocktail Digest. Seite 35. Brooklyn Cocktail.

1⁄2 oz. Dry Vermouth
Dash Maraschino
2 oz. Rye
Dash Angostura Bitters
Shake.

1946 Bill Kelly: The Roving Bartender. Seite 28. Brooklyn Cocktail.

1 oz. Rye Whiskey
1/4 oz. Picon
1/4 oz. Maraschino
1/4 oz. French Vermouth
Stir. Twist lemon peel.

1946 Oscar Haimo: Cocktail and Wine Digest. Seite 40. Brooklyn Cocktail.

3/4 oz. Dry Vermouth
Dash Maraschino
2 oz. Rye
Dash Angostura Bitters
Stir.

1948 David A. Embury: The Fine Art of Mixing Drinks. Seite 162. Brooklyn.

1 part French Vermouth
3 parts Whisky
1 dash Maraschino to each drink
1 dash Amer Picon to each drink
Stir with large cubes of ice. If you do not have Amer
Picon, you can substitute Angostura.
You will note that the Brooklyn is nothing but a Dry
Manhattan with a dash of maraschino. It is supposed
to be a specialty of that grand old Brooklyn hotel,
the St. George. I would be willing to wager, however,
that even in Brooklyn there are at least five to ten
times as many Manhattans consumed as there are
Brooklyns. Try both and you will understand why.
Note that the Silver Bronx (page 157) is also some
times called the Brooklyn.

Anmerkung: Seite 157, Sliver Bronx:

1 part Orange Juice
2 parts Italian Vermouth
6 parts Gin
1 Egg White to each 2 drinks
Shake ingredients other than gin with cracked ice
and add gin in 2 or 3 installments, shaking after each
addition.
This cocktail is sometimes erroneously called the
BROOKLYN. See under whisky cocktails, page 162,
for the true Brooklyn.

1948 Hilario Alonso Sanchez: El arte del cantinero. Seite 377. Brooklyn.

1/2 vermouth francés.
1/2 whisky Rye.
Gotas de Amer Picón.
Gotas Marrasquino.
Hielo. Revuélvase, cuéle-
se y sírvase.

1948 Trader Vic: Bartender’s Guide. Seite 263. Brooklyn Cocktail.

1 oz. bourbon 1 dash maraschino liqueur
1/2 oz. French vermouth 1 dash Amer Picon
Shake with cracked ice; strain into chilled cocktail glass.

1949 Emile Bauwens: Livre de cocktails. Seite 28. Brooklyn cocktail.

1 Trait Marasquin –
1 Trait Amer Picon –
2/3 Whisky Canadian Club –
1/3 Vermouth Français –
Frapper au shaker et passer dans
un verre à cocktail.

1949 Harry Schraemli: Das grosse Lehrbuch der Bar. Seite 319. Brooklyn-Cocktail.

1 d. Amer-Picon, 1 d. Maraschino, 1/3 franz. Vermouth,
2/3 Canadian-Club-Whisky. Schütteln.

1950 Ted Shane: Authentic and Hilarious Bar Guide. Seite 49. Brooklyn Gin.

1 part Italian Vermouth 1⁄2 Egg White
2 dashes Orange Juice 2 parts Gin
. Nutmeg
Shake with ice and strain. Grate nutmeg over drink.

1952 Anonymus: Cocktails. Seite 67. Brooklyn.

Dans le verre à mélange:
Un trait de Marasquin,
1/2 de vermouth français,
1/2 de Rye whisky,
Bien remuer et servir.

1952 Charles: The Cocktail Bar. Seite 43. Brooklyn Cocktail.

1 dash of Amer Picon,
1 dash of maraschino,
1/6 gill of French (or dry Martini) vermouth,
1/3 gill of Canadian Club whisky.
Use the mixing glass.

1953 Anonymus: Manual del bar. Seite 157. Brooklyn.

. 1/2 cucharadita de Granadina.
Batido. 1/2 Crema de Menta.
Servido en copa de 100 30 gramos de Amer. Picón.
gramos. 30 gramos de Vermouth Fran-
. ces
. 30 gramos de Dry Gin.

1953 Anonymus: The U.K.B.G. Guide to Drinks. Seite 57. Brooklyn.

1/2 Rye Whisky.
1/2 Dry Vermouth.
1 Dash Maraschino.
1 Dash Amer Picon.
Stir and Strain.

1953 David A. Embury: The Fine Art of Mixing Drinks. Seite 162. Brooklyn.

1 part French Vermouth
3 parts Whisky
1 dash Maraschino to each drink
1 dash Amer Picon to each drink
Stir with large cubes of ice. If you do not have Amer Picon, you can
substitute Angostura.

You will note that the Brooklyn is nothing but a Dry Manhattan with
a dash of maraschino. It is supposed to be a specialty of that grand old
Brooklyn hotel, the St. George. I would be willing to wager, however,
that even in Brooklyn there are at least five to ten times as many
Manhattans consumed as there are Brooklyns. Try both and you will
understand why. Note that the Silver Bronx (page 157) is also some
times called the Brooklyn.

1953 Marcel et Roger Louc: Cocktails et Grand Crus. Seite 50. Brooklyn Cocktail.

Un trait Bitter Orange
Deux traits Maraschino
Luxardo
1/3 Vermouth Français
2/3 Whisky Rye.

1955 Anonymus: The U.K.B.G. Guide to Drinks. Seite 57. Brooklyn.

1/2 Rye Whisky.
1/2 Dry Vermouth.
1 Dash Maraschino.
1 Dash Amer Picon.
Stir and Strain.

1956 Patrick Gavin Duffy: The Official Mixer’s Manual. Seite 96. Brooklyn.

2/3 Rye Whiskey
1/3 Dry Vermouth
1 Dash Maraschino
1 Dash Amer Picon
Stir well with ice and strain into
glass.

1957 Henri Barman: Cocktails et autres boissons mélangées. Seite 29. Brooklyn.

Timbale à mélange, glace
2/3 Canadian Whisky
1/3 Vermouth français
1 trait Amer Picon
1 trait Marasquin
Bien remuer en timbale et
passer dans verre à cocktail.
Mélangeur électr. : voir note.

1957 Lawrence Blochman: Here’s How. Seite 21. Brooklyn Cocktail.

2 parts Canadian Club
1 part French vermouth
1 dash Amer Picon
Stir vigorously with ice, strain into a cocktail glass, and
ponder the presence of Canadian whisky in a Brooklyn
cocktail, a mystery quite as profound as the perform- ­
ance of the Dodgers at mid-season.

1959 Anonymus: Manzarbeitia y compagnia. Brooklyn Cocktail.

Un golpe de Campari
Un golpe de Marrasquino
2/3 Whiskey SEAGRAM’S V. O.
1/3 Noilly Prat

1960 Anonymus: The U.K.B.G. Guide to Drinks. Seite 56. Brooklyn.

1/2 Rye Whisky.
1/2 Dry Vermouth.
1 Dash Maraschino.
1 Dash Amer Picon.
Stir and Strain.

1963 Luigi Veronelli: I cocktails. Seite 97. Brooklyn Cocktail.

1 bicchiere e 1/2 di bourbon whisky
1/2 bicchiere di vermouth dry
4 gocce di maraschino
ghiaccio a cubetti
Introdurre qualche cubetto di ghiaccio nel mixer. Versare
il bourbon ed il vermouth dry e mescolarli usando l’ap­-
posito cucchiaio; aggiungere il maraschino. Mescolare
piuttosto forte, lasciar riposare uno o due secondi, ripren­-
dere infine a mescolare ma lentamente. Servire subito.

1964 Anonymus: Manual del bar. Seite 136. Brooklyn.

2/3 de Rye Whisky.
1/3 de Vermouth dulce.
1 golpe de Marrasquino.
1 golpe ele Amer Picón.

1964 Anonymus: Manual del bar. Seite 157. Brooklyn.

. 2/3 Rye Whisky.
Batido. 1/3 Vermouth dulce.
Servido en copa de 100 1 golpe Marrasquino.
gramos. 1golpe Amer Picón.

1965 Aladar von Wesendonk: 888 Cocktails. Seite 67. Brooklin.

2/3 Seagram’s V . O . Whiskey
1/3 Noilly Prat Vermouth
1 dash Amer Picon
1 dash Stock Maraschino
im shaker mit Eis kurz schütteln,
abseihen und 1 Maraschino=
kirsche dazugeben

1965 Anonymus: The U.K.B.G. Guide to Drinks. Seite 59. Brooklyn.

1/2 Rye Whisky.
1/2 Sweet Vermouth
1 Dash Maraschino.
1 Dash Amer Picon.
MIXING GLASS.

1965 Harry Schraemli: Manuel du bar. Seite 372. Brooklyn Cocktail.

1 dash Amer-Picon, 1 dash marasquin, 1/3 vermouth blanc, 2/3 Cana-
dian-Club-Whisky. Agiter.

1965 Robert London & Anne London: Cocktails and Snacks. Seite 51. Brooklyn Cocktail.

2 ounces ryе оr bourbon Dash of maraschino liqueur
3/4 ounce dry vermouth Dash of Angostura bitters
Shake with cracked ice. Strain into cocktail glass.

1966 Harry Schraemli: Le roi du bar. Seite 57. Brooklyn Cocktail.

Shaker. 1 d [dash] Picon, 1 d [dash] marasquin, 1/3 ver- ­
mouth sec, 2/3 Canadian whisky.

1966 Oscar Haimo: Cocktail and Wine Digest. Seite 39. Brooklyn Cocktail.

1/4 oz. Dry Vermouth
Dash Maraschino. 2 oz. Rye.
Stir with Ice & Strain.

1972 Trader Vic: Trader Vic’s Bartender’s Guide. Seite 83. Brooklyn Cocktail.

1 ounce gin
1/2 ounce Italian vermouth
2 dashes orange juice
1/2 egg white
Shake with ice cubes. Strain into chilled cocktail glass. Dust
with grated nutmeg.

1973 Oscar Haimo: Cocktail and Wine Digest. Seite 35. Brooklyn Cocktail.

1/4 oz. Dry Vermouth
Dash Maraschino. 2 oz. Rye.
Stir with Ice & Strain.

1976 Anonymus: International Guide to Drinks. Seite 45. Brooklyn.

1⁄2 rye
1⁄2 sweet vermouth
Dash maraschino
Dash Amer Picon
Mixing glass

1976 Harry Craddock: The Savoy Cocktail Book. Seite 34. Brooklyn Cocktail.

1 Dash Amer Picon.
1 Dash Maraschino.
2/3 Canadian Whisky.
1/3 French Vermouth.
Shake well and strain into
cocktail glass.

1977 Stan Jones: Jones’ Complete Barguide. Seite 239. Brooklyn.

Cocktail Glass Stir
1-1/2 oz rye or Bourbon
1/2 oz dry vermouth
1/4 oz Amer Picon
1/4 oz maraschino liqueur

1979 Fred Powell: The Bartender’s Standard Manual. Seite 17. Brooklyn.

1 1/2 jigger Whiskey
1/2 jigger Dry Vermouth
1 Dash Maraschino
1 Dash Bitters
Stir with ice and strain.

1979 Fred Powell: The Bartender’s Standard Manual. Seite 17. Brooklyn (Gin).

1 1/2 jigger Gin
1/2 jigger Sweet Vermouth
2 Dashes Orange Juice
1/2 Egg White
Nutmeg
Shake with ice. Strain into
cocktail glass. Add grated
nutmeg.

2017 Jim Meehan: Meehan’s Bartender Manual. Seite 325. Brooklyn. 2 oz. Rittenhouse bonded rye whiskey; 0,75 oz. Dolin blanc vermouth; 0,25 oz. Luxardo maraschino liqueur; 0,25 oz. Bigallet China-China Amer liqueur.

2018 Alex Day, Nick Fauchald, David Kaplan: Cocktail Codex. Seite 87. Brooklyn. 2 ounces Rittenhouse rye; 3/4 ounce Dolin dry vermouth; 1/4 ounce Bigallet China-China Amer; 1 teaspoon Maraska maraschino liqueur; garnish: 1 brandied cherry.

explicit capitulum
*

About

Hi, I'm Armin and in my spare time I want to promote bar culture as a blogger, freelance journalist and Bildungstrinker (you want to know what the latter is? Then check out "About us"). My focus is on researching the history of mixed drinks. If I have ever left out a source you know of, and you think it should be considered, I look forward to hearing about it from you to learn something new. English is not my first language, but I hope that the translated texts are easy to understand. If there is any incomprehensibility, please let me know so that I can improve it.

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