Other topics

The socio-cultural history of the Pousse Café. Part 9: Knickebein

Titelbild Knickebein

Let’s now take a look at the German evolution of the Pousse Café: the Knickebein. How long has it been around, what is it?

Etymology

A knee deformity

The word ‘Knickebein’ is used as early as 1725 in a book about the poetry of Lower Saxony. It says: “He is a Knicke-Bein; he wobbles with his rump“. [17-278]

C. F. Weichmanns Poesie der Nieder-Sachsen. 1725, page 278.
C. F. Weichmanns Poesie der Nieder-Sachsen. 1725, page 278. [17-278]

– “Der ist ein Knicke-Bein; der wackelt mit dem Steusse”. [17-278]

The ‘Dictionary of the High German Dialect, with a constant comparison of the other dialects, especially the Upper German dialects’, published in Leipzig in 1775, states under the term ‘Knicken’ (to bend): “Bend when walking, to bend the knees deeper than is necessary for a proper gait. To bend with the feet, Swedish knacka. To walk in this way is called in Lower Saxon knickbeinen, and whoever has this gait, a Knickebein.[18-1663]

Anonymus: Versuch eines vollständigen grammatisch-kritischen Wörterbuches Der Hochdeutschen Mundart. Zweyter Theil. 1775, column 1663.
Anonymus: Versuch eines vollständigen grammatisch-kritischen Wörterbuches Der Hochdeutschen Mundart. Zweyter Theil. 1775, column 1663. [18-1663]

“Im Gehen knicken, die Knie tiefer einbiegen, als zum ordentlichen Gange nöthig ist. Mit den Füßen knicken, Schwed. knacka. Auf solche Art gehen, heißt im Nieders. knickbeinen, und welcher diesen Gang hat, ein Knickebein.[18-1663]

This explanation is also published in other works in later years, for example in 1787 [14-374] and 1808. [1-1661]

Taking this information into account, we can therefore conclude that ‘Knickebein’ is of Lower Saxon origin. However, we can understand this origin in the modern sense. In older literature in particular, Lower Saxon is understood to be the Low German or Low German language, a language spoken mainly in northern Germany and neighbouring regions. [29]

A ” Knickebein” is a knee deformity, also known as genu valgum, or knock-knees. [30] [4-560]

Family name

Knickebein is also a family name. [16-403] [27-25]

Drink

However, a certain drink is also known as a Knickebein. We will describe exactly what this means later. There are various legends about why the drink got its name.

Meyers Konversationslexikon writes “the name is said to have originated in Jena in 1845 and refers to a student with the nickname K[nickebein].[31]

– “der Name soll 1845 in Jena aufgekommen sein und sich auf einen Studenten mit dem Spitznamen K[nickebein]. beziehen.” [31]

However, the Tyrolean freedom fighter Andreas Hofer is also named as the creator of the name in a student song. [32]

In our view, however, these explanations are not very credible, as there are no reliable sources. It is more likely that the name for a particular type of drink has evolved in the vernacular. People were very creative in these matters. For example, the German Dictionary of Proverbs, published in 1867, writes under the keyword ‘Gotteswort’: “Other names for brandy or certain types of it, as they occur especially in the province of Prussia, are: Bindfaden (“binding thread”), Krumpholz (“crumpled wood”), Rachenputzer (“throat-cleaner”), Raschwalzer (“swishing waltz”), Reissnieder (“tear-down”), Sturak, Vidibum, Wupptich, Krolscholke-Dollwasser (‘krolscholke’ from the Polish grozolka = brandy); for special varieties: Knickebein (= maraschino with egg yolk), Kornus mit Gewehrüber (“grain brandy with rifle”) (= grain brandy with bitter), Lerchentriller (“lark trill”), Sanfter Heinrich (“gentle Henry”) for sweet brandies, in Danzig Machandel mit dem Knüppel (“Machandel with a cudgel”) (=Kaddig or juniper berry brandy with sugar, to which a wooden, spoon-like stick is added for stirring).[5-112]

Karl Friedrich Wilhelm Wander: Deutsches Sprichwörter-Lexikon. Zweiter Band. 1867, column 112.
Karl Friedrich Wilhelm Wander: Deutsches Sprichwörter-Lexikon. Zweiter Band. 1867, column 112. [5-112]

– “Andere Benennungen für Branntwein oder gewisse Sorten desselben, wie sie namentlich in der Provinz Preussen vorkommen, sind: Bindfaden, Krumpholz, Rachenputzer, Raschwalzer, Reissnieder, Sturak, Vidibum, Wupptich, Krolscholke-Dollwasser (von dem polnischen grozolka = Branntwein); für besondere Sorten: Knickebein (= Maraschino mit Eidotter), Kornus mit Gewehrüber (= Korn mit Bitter), Lerchentriller, Sanfter Heinrich für süsse Branntweine, in Danzig Machandel mit dem Knüppel (= Kaddig oder Wachholderbeerbranntwein mit Zucker, wozu ein hölzernes, löffelartiges Stäbchen zum Umrühren beigegeben wird).« [5-112]

The oldest sources

The oldest information on how to prepare a Knickebein comes from German-speaking countries. We can therefore assume that it is a German invention, which is certainly connected to the coffee house culture originating in France and the associated consumption of liqueurs called Chasse Café or Pousse Café. In a way, the Knickebein can be seen as the German evolution of the Pousse Café.

Knickebein trajectory.
Knickebein trajectory.

If you look at the distribution of the word over time, you can see that it only became relevant from the 1840s onwards. This indicates that the word became more popular from this time onwards and perhaps also appears more frequently because the drink of the same name was mentioned. [33]

It is fitting that the oldest document we could find describing how to prepare a Knickebein dates from 1854: “Knickebein is a cold drink. You put some of the finest curacao liqueur in a liqueur glass, put a whole egg yolk on top, add a few drops of the finest vanilla liqueur or maraschino and drink it in one gulp.” [3-191][3-192]

William Löbe: Illustrirtes Lexikon der gesammten Wirthschaftskunde. Dritter Band. 1854, page 191-192.
William Löbe: Illustrirtes Lexikon der gesammten Wirthschaftskunde. Dritter Band. 1854, page 191-192. [3-191] [3-192]

– “Knickebein, ist ein kaltes Getränk. Man thut in ein Liquerglas etwas feinsten Caracaoliquer, schlägt ein ganzes Eidotter darauf, einige Tropfen feinsten Vanilleliquer oder Maraschino darüber und trinkt es mit einem Schluck.” [3-191] [3-192]

This is also stated in 1856. [19-148]

In 1861, the Knickebein was defined more generally as “schnapps with egg yolk”. [21] This definition was repeated in 1868. [16-403] 1867, 1882 and 1886, the Knickebein was referred to as “maraschino with egg yolk”. [5-112] [10-390] [26-175] In 1877, it was understood to mean “liqueur with egg yolk”, [7-96] as well as in 1881. [8-150] In 1899, it was stated that a Knickebein was a “fine (rose) liqueur with an egg yolk”. [13-162]

In 1863, a definition is given that is not quite correct, because the egg yolk is not mentioned: “Strong drink is called Knickebein(breaky-leg); and: “He’s been to Bungay fait, and broke both his legs”, he has been to the B. market and has broken both legs, stands for: He is drunk, as in Egyptian hieroglyphic writing the verb “to be drunk” was accompanied by a cut human leg as a determinative.” [2-416]

Zeitschrift der Deutschen Morgenländischen Gesellschaft. Siebzehnter Band. 1863, page 416.
Zeitschrift der Deutschen Morgenländischen Gesellschaft. Siebzehnter Band. 1863, page 416. [2-416]

– “Starkes Getränk nennt man Knickebein (Breaky-leg); und: „He’s been to Bungay fait, and broke both his legs“, er ist auf dem B.-Markte gewesen und hat beide Beine gebrochen, steht für: Er ist betrunken, wie man in Aegyptischer Hieroglyphenschrift dem Verbum „betrunken sein“ als Determinativum ein durchschnittenes Menschen-Bein beigab.” [2-416]

However, this explanation may be an indication that the association between ‘broken legs’ and ‘being drunk’ also existed in Low German, as it did in English and among the ancient Egyptians.In the 1860s, Knickebein must have already been popular throughout Germany, as Urban Dubois wrote in his book ‘Cuisine de tous les pays’, published in its third edition in 1872: “Knickebein. This is a very popular fortifying drink in Germany. – Place a fresh egg yolk on the bottom of a champagne flute, pour half a liqueur glass of cognac over it and pour a glass of Alkermes or good Curaçao over it so that the liqueur stays on top and does not mix with the base liqueur.” [11-574]

Urban Dubois: Cuisine de touts les pays. 3e édition. 1872, page 574.
Urban Dubois: Cuisine de touts les pays. 3e édition. 1872, page 574. [11-574]

“Knickebein. C’est une boisson restaurante très en vogue en Allemagne. — Déposer au fond d’une flûte à champagne un jaune d’œuf frais; sur l’œuf, verser doucement un demi-verre à liqueur de cognac, et sur celui-ci un verre d’alkermès ou bon curaçao, en ayant soin que ce dernier reste au-dessus, sans se mêler avec la liqueur du fond: on doit avaler cette boisson d’un seul trait.” [11-574]

The first edition was published in 1868. [11-iv] This text was also quoted in English-language texts from 1869 and 1870. There, however, it is mentioned that it was a fashionable drink in Berlin. [6-148] [9-580]

In other countries, the Knickebein was only recognised later. In Basel, it was stated in 1873: “The Low German Knickebein, brandy with egg, was newly introduced here (at the hospital).” [25-16]

Friedrich Becker: Bericht der Gewerbeschule zu Basel 1872-73, page 16.
Friedrich Becker: Bericht der Gewerbeschule zu Basel 1872-73, page 16. [25-16]

– “Hier neu eingeführt (am Spital) ist der niederdeutsche Knickebein, Branntwein mit Ei. [25-16]

So what is a Knickebein?

Golden Slipper.
Golden Slipper.

 

Generally speaking, the Knickebein can be defined as a drink consisting of layered liqueurs with a raw egg yolk. The Golden Slipper is therefore also a Knickebein.

The recipe was expanded in later years. Leo Engel, for example, added a cap of beaten egg white to his version, known as “Leo’s Knickebein”, and a few drops of Angostura bitters on top. He also gave us instructions on how to drink this Knickebein. He wrote in 1878:

Leo Engel: American & Other Drinks. 1878, page 73.
Leo Engel: American & Other Drinks. 1878, page 73. [40-73]

DIRECTIONS FOR TAKING THE KNICKEBEIN. … 1. Pass the glass under the Nostrils and Inhale the Flavour. — Pause. 2. Hold the glass perpendicularly, close under your mouth, open it wide, and suck the froth by drawing a Deep Breath. — Pause again. 3. Point the lips and take one-third of the liquid contents remaining in the glass without touching the yolk.—Pause once more. 4. Straighten the body, throw the head backward, swallow the contents remaining in the glass all at once, at the same time breaking the yolk in your mouth. [40-73]

The Knickebein – a German favourite

Just how popular the Knickebein must have been in Germany can be seen from the fact that there were already special glasses for it in 1857. An advert by Julius Lange from Berlin states: “My crystal and glassware warehouse is fully stocked … . For wine bar and confectionery owners, I recommend Maitrank glasses, Absynth and Knickebein glasses.[20]

Berlinische Nachrichten von Staats- und gelehrten Sachen. No. 111, 14. May 1857.
Berlinische Nachrichten von Staats- und gelehrten Sachen. No. 111, 14. May 1857. [20]

-“Mein Crystall- und Glaswaaren-Lager ist auf das Allervollständigste assortiert … . Für Weinstuben- und Conditorei-Besitzer empfehle ich Maitrank-Tönnchen, Abcynth- und Knickebein-Gläser. [20]

 

Knickebein glass.
Knickebein glass. [38-256]

Incidentally, various glasses are also illustrated in the 1913 Lexikon der Getränke, including the Knickebein glass.[38-256] This speaks in favour of the Knickebein’s continued popularity among Germans.

This is consistent with the statements by Urban Dubois quoted above, according to which the Knickebein was a drink that was very fashionable in Germany and Berlin in the 1860s. [6-148] [9-580] [11-574]

German pubs abroad also offered the Knickebein. In 1858, the ‘Heidelberger Fass’ opened in Amsterdam and the owner let the locals know: “HEIDELBERGER FASS! Warmoestraat over de St. Jansstraat, J, 601. I take the liberty of inviting my honoured patrons and all admirers of fine wine to the opening of my WINERY on Saturday the 19th of this month at 2 o’clock in the afternoon. GERMAN and FRENCH WINES of all types are available pure and unadulterated by the bottle and by the glass, as well as all FINE LIQUEURS, including the famous KNICKEBEIN, and other REFRESHMENTS. Every evening fresh STRAWBERRY and MAIWEIN by the punch bowl and by the glass. HEINRICH FRITZEN, former waiter at the “UNIE.” (10348)[34]

Algemeen Handelsblad. Amsterdam, 19.6.1858.
Algemeen Handelsblad. Amsterdam, 19.6.1858. [34]

– “HEIDELBERGER FASS! Warmoestraat over de St. Jansstraat, J, 601. Zur Eröffnung meiner WEINWIRTHSCHAFT am Sonnabend den 19den dieses Monats, um 2 Uhr Nachmittags, erlaube ich mir meine geehrten Gönnern und alle Verehrer des edlen Weines ergebenst einzuladen. DEUTSCHE und FRANZÖSISCHE WEINE in allen Gattungen sind rein und unverfälscht per Flasche und per Glas bei mir zu haben, sowie alle FEINE LIQUEURE, worunter der berühmte KNICKEBEIN, und sonstige ERFRISCHUNG. Jeden Abend frischer ERDBEEREN- und MAIWEIN per Bowle und per Glas. HEINRICH FRITZEN, früher Kellner in der „UNIE.“ (10348) [34]

So in a German wine bar, in addition to wine and punch, liqueur and Knickebein were also offered.

However, the Knickebein was not only available in wine taverns, but also in so-called punch rooms. In 1866, Louis Glaser advertised in the Schweinfurter Tageblatt: “In the punch room of Glaser’s patisserie you can get: Punch, grog, mulled wine, mousseux, Knickebein, liqueurs etc., oranges and bitter orange, beignets, filled meringues, New Year’s cakes, cheese cakes, apple cakes and all kinds of gingerbread. Louis Glaser.[22-1418]

Schweinfurter Tagblatt. Nr. 208. 29. December 1866, page 1418.
Schweinfurter Tagblatt. Nr. 208. 29. December 1866, page 1418. [22-1418]

– “Im Punschzimmer der Glaser’schen Konditorei ist zu haben: Punsch, Grog, Glühwein, Mousseux, Knickebein, Liqueure etc., Apfelsinen und Pomeranzen, Krapfen, gefüllte Meringues, Neujahrskränze, Käse-, Apfel- und alle Sorten Lebkuchen. Louis Glaser. [22-1418]

Also in 1866, in Laibach, today known as Ljubljana and the capital of Slovenia, is advertised the “Restaurant “zum Ritter” Klagenfurterstraße No. 70b. Excellent and cheap food and drinks! St. Anna wine the Seitel 12 kr; Grazer Schreiner beer the small pitcher 11 kr; Genuine Slavonian Slivovitz the glass 2 kr; Finest liqueurs the glass 4 kr; Black coffee 6 kr; Hamburger Knickebein 10 kr; Various fork breakfasts. Lunch is also available by subscription. (2368-3)[23-1768]

Intelligenzblatt zur Laibacher Zeitung Nr. 266, 20. November 1866, page 1768.
Intelligenzblatt zur Laibacher Zeitung Nr. 266, 20. November 1866, page 1768. [23-1768]

– “Restauration „zum Ritter“ Klagenfurterstraße Nr. 70b. Vorzügliche und billige Speisen und Getränke! St. Anna-Wein das Seitel 12 kr.; Grazer Schreiner Bier das Krügel 11 kr.; Echter slavonischer Slivovitz das Glasel 2 kr.; Feinste Liqueure das Glasel 4 kr.; Schwarzer kaffee 6 kr.; Hamburger Knickebein 10 kr.; Verschiedene Gabelfrühstücke. Auch ist Mittagskost im Abonnement zu haben. (2368-3) [23-1768]

In 1874 this report appeared in an American newspaper: “New Year in Berlin. Berlin, 2 January 1874. … In the patisseries and cafés, which are known to be united in Berlin, a chattering, noisy swarm of people displaces the devout reading community of the weekdays. While the regulars consider it beneath their dignity to sample the sweets on the sales tables – they take their café, cocoa, knickebein and the like every day – today’s men devour mountains of cake with their café or chocolate. And after a quarter of an hour, the industrious consumer is already clearing his seat again, because the holiday must be utilised. Messieurs Fripponi, Spargnapani, Stehley and whatever the cake-baking Engaddiners of Berlin are called, smile quietly into their olive-coloured Italian faces and think: “Oh, if only it were Sunday every day – then I wouldn’t have to hold the expensive newspapers and the boring café guests could jump in the lake!”[36]

Illinois Staats-Zeitung, 27. January 1874, page 2.
Illinois Staats-Zeitung, 27. January 1874, page 2. [36]

– “Neujahr in Berlin. Berlin, 2. Januar 1874. … In den Conditoreien und Café’s, die in Berlin bekanntlich vereint sind, verdrängt ein plappernder genäschiger Menschenschwarm die andächtige Lese-Gemeinde der Wochentage. Während der Stammgast es unter seiner Würde hält, von den Süßigkeiten auf den Verkaufstischen zu kosten – er nimmt tagtäglich seinen Café, seinen Cacao, seinen Knickebein u. dgl. – vertilgt heut männiglich zum Café oder zur Chocolade Berge von Kuchen. Und nach einer Viertelstunde räumt der fleißige Consument schon wieder seinen Platz, denn der Feiertag muß ausgenutzt werden. Messieurs Fripponi, Spargnapani, Stehley und wie die kuchenbackenden Engaddiner Berlin’s alle heißen, lächeln in ihr olivfarbnes Italiener-Antlitz still hinein und denken: „Ach, wenn es doch alle Tag’ Sonntag wär’ – dann brauchte ich keine theuren Zeitungen zu halten und die langweiligen Café-Gäste könnten bleiben, wo der Pfeffer wächst!“” [36]

This is an important article, as it proves that the connections we have already established for the Pousse Café were also valid in Germany. People originally went to the coffee house as a place to catch up on the news, to chat and to read the newspapers. People stayed there for a long time and drank coffee and liqueur – as a pousse café, i.e. after coffee, or as a Knickebein.

As late as 1893, the Knickebein was apparently still a standard drink in Germany, alongside liqueur, beer and wine. The Illinois Staatszeitung reported at the time: “In the second general session of the Naturforschertag in Nuremberg, the current Vice-Rector of the University of Erlangen, Prof. Dr v. Stümppel, gave a lecture on the harmful effects of alcohol consumption, to which the learned assembly listened attentively and gave deserved applause at the end. The audience used the break after the lecture to hurry to the refreshment halls and fortify themselves with a glass of beer, a glass of liqueur, a glass of wine and also a Knickebein.[37]

Illinois Staats-Zeitung 16. October 1893, page 11.
Illinois Staats-Zeitung 16. October 1893, page 11. [37]

– “In der zweiten allgemeinen Sitzung des Naturforschertags in Nürnberg hielt der derzeitige Prorektor der Universität Erlangen, Prof. Dr. v. Stümppel, einen Vortrag über die gesundheitsschädliche Wirkung des Alkoholgenusses, dem die gelehrte Versammlung andächtig lauschte und am Schlusse verdienten Beifall zollte. Die nach dem Vortrage eintretende Pause benützten die Zuhörer, um zu den Erfrischungshallen zu eilen und sich am Glase Bier, Gläschen Liqueur, Schoppen Wein, auch Knickebein zu stärken.« [37]

The Germans evidently took the custom of drinking Knickebein with them to the USA, along with their fondness for liquor, beer and wine. In 1868, this advertisement appeared in the Baltimore Daily Alarm Clock: “A. v. MITZEL’S CAFE RESTAURANT, No. 1 Post Office Ave, Corner of Second St. Today’s snacks and luncheons, bouillon with or without egg, hot oyster, caviar, anchovy and meat patties, sandwiches of all kinds, raw beefsteak, various salads and other finer snacks, plus Cincinnati beer. Wines, liqueurs and Berlin Knickebein and other selected hot and cold drinks.” [35]

Täglicher Baltimore Wecker. 26. October 1868, page 2.
Täglicher Baltimore Wecker. 26. October 1868, page 2. [35]

– “A. v. MITZEL’S CAFE RESTAURANT, No. 1 Post Office Ave., Ecke von Second Str. Heutige Snacks und Luncheons, Bouillon mit oder ohne Ei, heiße Auster-, Caviar-, Sardellen- und Fleisch-Pastetchen, Sandwiches aller Art, rohes Beefsteak, diverse Salate und sonstige feinere Imbisse, dazu Cincinnati Bier. Weine, Liqueure und Berliner Knickebeine und sonstige ausgewählte warme und kalte Getränke.” [35]

William Boothby: The World’s Drinks and How to Mix Them. 1908, page 63.
William Boothby: The World’s Drinks and How to Mix Them. 1908, page 63. [45-63]

Nevertheless, in America the Knickebein was probably only known in the German community. William Boothby writes: This Famous Teutonic beverage is little known in America, and few bartenders have ever acquired the art of compounding one. It is an after-dinner drink, and in order to be fully appreciated, it must be partaken of according to the following directions, as four different sensations are experienced by the drinker. Therefore, the duty of the presiding mixologist is to thoroughly explain to the uninitiated the modis operandi, etc. First – Pass the glass under the nose and inhale the flavor for about five seconds. Second – Hold the glass perpendicularly, open your mouth wide and suck the froth from off the top of the glass. Pause five seconds. Third – Point the lips and take one-third of the liquid contents of the glass without touching the yolk. Pause again for a few seconds. Fourth – Straighten the body, throw the head back, swallow the contents remaining in the glass and break the yolk in your mouth at the same time. [45-63]

In the military, the Knickebein was also a drink that was savoured. In a story published in the Österreichische Militärzeitung in 1867, it says: “Whether he drank too quickly or too much, in short, after a while (by the way: with the exception of the guard commander, we were no longer completely sober) he became hilarious and asked us to prepare a ‘stiff grog’ and to finish off a ‘Knickebein’ for everyone.[15-39]

Anonymus: Nach dem Zapfenstreiche. Fünftes Bändchen. 1867, page 39.
Anonymus: Nach dem Zapfenstreiche. Fünftes Bändchen. 1867, page 39. [15-39]

– “Mochte er nun zu rasch oder zu viel getrunken haben, kurz, nach einiger Zeit (NB. so ganz nüchtern waren wir, mit Ausnahme des Wachkommandanten, auch nicht mehr) wurde er ausgelassen lustig und bat uns, einen ‘steifen Grog’ und zum Schluß für Jeden einen ‘Knickebein’ herrichten zu dürfen. [15-39]

In 1871, Theodor Fontane reported in ‘Kriegsgefangen. Erlebtes 1870.’ (‘Prisoners of War. Experiences from 1870’): “Half soaked, with the marvellous haze of some twenty rubber coats, it was a situation that had to be countered with the most powerful means. ‘The only thing that will help here is a Knickebein,’ came from our midst. ‘Knickebein?’ I asked in astonishment and as if in anxious echo. But the Sannois mill seemed to have heard this rather un-French word more than once, for five glasses, five egg yolks and two cut bottles of cognac and anisette soon appeared. I tried to protest because of my throat and larynx, but I was answered by general merriment and the assurance: ‘That’s what the egg yolk is for; egg yolk dampens.’[24-257]

Theodor Fontane: Kriegsgefangen. 1871, page 257.
Theodor Fontane: Kriegsgefangen. 1871, page 257. [24-257]

– “Halb durchnäßt, dazu der wunderbare Dunst einiger zwanzig Kautschukmäntel, es war eine Situation, der mit den kräftigsten Mitteln begegnet werden mußte. ›Da hilft nur Knickebein,‹ erklang es aus unserer Mitte. ›Knickebein?‹ fragt’ ich verwundert und wie in bangem Echo. Aber die Mühle von Sannois schien dies ziemlich unfranzösische Wort schon mehr als einmal vernommen zu haben, denn alsbald erschienen fünf Gläser, fünf Eigelb und zwei geschliffene Flaschen mit Kognak und Anisette. Von Hals und Kehlkopfs wegen sucht’ ich zu protestieren, aber allgemeine Heiterkeit und die Versicherung: ›Dafür ist ja das Eigelb; Eigelb dämpft,‹ antworteten mir.” [24-257]

It is therefore not surprising that the Knickebein is also described in detail in the book ‘Bowlen und Pünsche zum Manöver- und Feldgebrauch’ (‘Bowls and Punches for Manoeuvre and Field Use’), published in 1890: “The Knickebein is a wonderful drink that has proven to be excellent in all situations: in summer and winter, in frost and heat, after a hard day’s work, early on an empty stomach and late in the evening after a boozy feast; Knickebein can also be made for every taste: fine and sweet for the ladies, strong and powerful for the disciples of St Barbara. The Knickebein is prepared by filling the slender goblet of a glass with a liqueur, sealing it with a fresh egg yolk from which all the egg white has been removed, and topping it up with another liqueur. The Knickebein probably came to us from France, where it has been known since time immemorial under the name Pousse l’amour (scilicet for Knickebein).[41-77] [41-78]

Anonymus: Bowlen und Pünsche zum Manöver- und Feldgebrauch der deutschen Armee. page 77-78.
Anonymus: Bowlen und Pünsche zum Manöver- und Feldgebrauch der deutschen Armee. page 77-78. [41-77] [41-78]

– “Der Knickebein ist ein wunderbares Getränk, das sich in allen Lebenslagen vorzüglich bewährt hat: im Sommer wie im Winter, bei Frost und Hitze, nach des Tages Last und Arbeit, früh nüchtern, wie spät abends nach feuchtfröhlchem Gelage; auch kann man Knickebein für jede Geschmacksrichtung herstellen: fein und lieblich für die Damen, stark und kräftig für die Jünger der St. Barbara. Der Knickebein wird bereitet, indem man den schlanken Kelch eines Glases, mit einem Likör gefüllt, durch ein ganz frisches Eidotter, von dem alles Eiweiß entfernt ist, verschließt und darüber einen andern Likör nachfüllt. Der Knickebein dürfte aus Frankreich zu uns gekommen sein, dort ist er unter dem Namen Pousse l’amour (scil. für Knickebein) von alters her bekannt.” [41-77] [41-78]

The aforementioned St Barbara is not only the patron saint of miners, but also of artillery and is depicted “with a cannon, in the hope that the artillery may hit its targets in the same way as the lightning struck Dioscuros, or because of the association with sudden death.” [12]

Knickebein of the 1st Saxon Field Artillery Regiment No. 12.
Knickebein of the 1st Saxon Field Artillery Regiment No. 12. [41-79]

The accompanying illustration in the ‘Bowlen- und Punschbuch’ is also very informative. It shows the Knickebein of the 1st Saxon Field Artillery Regiment No.12. With cherry brandy, egg yolk and green bitter orange, green-red-gold, [41-79] it represents, we assume, the regimental colours?

One can assume that each regiment had its own Knickebein recipe, just as they also had their own regimental concoctions – most likely served as a layered pousse café. The Lexicon of Drinks, published in 1913, lists them. We have already gone into this in more detail in the context of the B&B, and would just like to mention here that the B&B was also originally prepared in layers. The regimental mixture of the 1st Saxon Field Artillery Regiment is listed there with the words: “12. Feldartl. – Regt. (1. Sächs.), Dresden. 1/3 Curacao w., 1/3 Marasquin, 1/3 Bols-Cherry-Brandy. [38-194]

Pousse l’amour

The recipes for a pousse l’amour correspond to those for a Knickebein. Based on the sources we have found so far, we suspect that the Knickebein is older and a German invention. This would mean that its recipe came to France and was simply given a different name there. This interpretation is also supported by Urban Dubois’ book published in 1872. There he writes how popular the Knickebein was in Germany. One can assume that he would have remarked that this was nothing other than a pousse l’amour if this was its origin. This is probably also the view in ‘Hegenbarth’s Bowlen-, Punsch- und Kaffee-Haus-Getränkebuch’ from 1903: “Pousse l’amour is a similar arbitrary composition, one might say it is the French name for the German ‘Knickbein’.” [42-46]

Anonymus: Hegenbarth’s Bowlen-, Punsch-, und Kaffee-Haus-Getränkebuch. 3. Auflage. 1903, page 46.
Anonymus: Hegenbarth’s Bowlen-, Punsch-, und Kaffee-Haus-Getränkebuch. 3. Auflage. 1903, page 46. [42-46]

– “Pousse l’amour ist eine ähnliche beliebige Komposition, man möchte sagen, es ist die französische Benennung des deutschen ›Knickbein‹.” [42-46]

Nevertheless, there are also differing opinions. The book ‘Bowlen und Pünsche zum Manöver- und Feldgebrauch’ from 1890 reports:”The Knickebein probably came to us from France, where it has been known since time immemorial under the name Pousse l’amour (scilicet for Knickebein). [41-77] [41-78] The Pousse L’Amour is described as follows: “This old French drink has some similarities with Pousse Cafe and must be prepared with just as much care.[41-80]

Jerry Thomas: How to Mix Drinks. Page 66. 1862.
Jerry Thomas: How to Mix Drinks. Page 66. 1862. [43-66]

The name ‘pousse l’amour’ may have been given to the Knickebein in the USA, possibly in the New Orleans area with its coffee house culture. However, it may have been an early import from France. Jerry Thomas lists it as early as 1862 and writes: “This delightful French drink is described in the above engraving. To mix it fill a small wine-glass half full of maraschino, then put in the pure yolk of an egg, surround the yolk with vanilla cordial, and dash the top with Cognac brandy.” [43-66]

As we have seen, the Knickebein, a pousse café with an egg yolk, was a popular drink in Germany. Each regiment had its own mixture, probably prepared as a pousse café. Liqueur was an integral part of the culture.

Wilhelm Busch: Die fromme Helene. 1899, page 101.
Wilhelm Busch: Die fromme Helene. 1899, page 101. [39-101]

It is not without reason that Wilhelm Busch wrote in ‘Die fromme Helene’ (‘The Pius Helene’), published in 1872, “Es ist ein Brauch von Alters her: Wer Sorgen hat, hat auch Likör!” (“It is a custom from time immemorial: Whoever has worries also has liqueur!“) [39-101] Against the background of what we have outlined, namely that liqueur was drunk everywhere and was popular, Helene’s statement takes on a very special meaning, because it supports our statement. Wilhelm Busch’s poem is often expanded by the addition “Doch wer zufrieden und vergnügt, Sieht auch zu, dass er welchen kriegt.” (“But he who is content and happy, also takes care that he gets some.”) [44-128] This is what Wilhelm Busch is said to have said – but this line is missing in the pious Helene.

Just how popular the pousse café was in Germany can be seen from the table of contents of the Lexikon der Getränke published in 1913. There are numerous drinks summarised under the heading “Pousse-Cafés and similar mixtures“. They are called: Achenbach, American Pousse-Cafe, Angels Dream, Angels Tit, Angels Wing, Baron v. Reeden favorit, Brandy Champarelle, Brandy Scaffa, Charlies Knickebein, Corps Reviver, Dänischer Pousse-Café, English Tit, Faivres Pousse-Café, Gin Scaffa, Happy Moment, Helgoländer, Jersey Pousse-Café, Kerkau Sylvester-Pousse-Café, Kirsche, Knickebein, Kossak, Kuss mit Liebe, Loie fuller, Maidens Kiss, My sweet Mary, Naval float, Non plus ultra, pariser Pousse-Café, Pousse-Café, Pousse l’amour, Princess Juliana, Rainbow Buff, Riche, Rum Scaffa, Santinas Pousse-Café, Saratoga Pousse-Café, Sheffield’s Pousse-Café, Stars and Stripes, Stifferine Brace, The flag, Union Pousse-Café, Widows Riss. [38-275]

Eventually, the Pousse Café also made its way to the USA, where it underwent another transformation. We will look at this in the next post in this series.

Sources
  1. https://archive.org/details/bub_gb_DpdEAAAAcAAJ/page/n827/mode/2up?q=Knickebein Johann Christoph Adelung: Grammatisch-kritisches Wörterbuch der hochdeutschen Mundart, mit beständiger Vergleichung der übrigen Mundarten, besonders aber der oberdeutschen. Zweyter Theil, von F-L. Wien, 1808
  2. https://archive.org/details/bub_gb__uAOAAAAIAAJ/page/415/mode/2up?q=Knickebein Zeitschrift der Deutschen Morgenländischen Gesellschaft. Siebzehnter Band. Leipzig, 1863.
  3. https://archive.org/details/bub_gb_bidAAAAAcAAJ/page/190/mode/2up?q=Knickebein William Löbe (Hrsg.): Illustrirtes Lexikon der gesammten Wirthschaftskunde. Dritter Band, I-M. Leipzig, 1854.
  4. https://archive.org/details/bub_gb_ljYAAAAAQAAJ/page/560/mode/2up?q=Knickebein Joseph Hyrtl: Handbuch der topographischen Anatomie und ihrer praktisch medicinisch-chirurgischen Anwendungen. Vierte Auflage. Zweiter Band. Wien, 1860.
  5. https://archive.org/details/deutsches-sprichworter-lexikon-band-2-gott-bis-lehren/page/n71/mode/2up?q=Knickebein Karl Friedrich Wilhelm Wander (Hrsg.): Deutsches Sprichwörter-Lexikon. Zweiter Band. Gott bis Lehren. Leipzig, 1867.
  6. https://archive.org/details/b28049275/page/148/mode/2up?q=Knickebein Anonymus: The epicures year book for 1869. London, 1869
  7. https://archive.org/details/bub_gb_DU01AQAAMAAJ/page/n99/mode/2up?q=Knickebein Fritz Hönig: Wörterbuch der Kölner Mundart. Köln, 1877.
  8. https://archive.org/details/bub_gb_fd4NAAAAQAAJ/page/n171/mode/2up?q=Knickebein Karl Albrecht: Die Leipziger Mundart. Grammatik und Wörterbuch der Leipziger Volkssprache. Leipzig, 1881.
  9. https://archive.org/details/b28131241?q=Knickebein Urbain-Dubouis: Cosmopolitan Cookery. London, 1870.
  10. https://archive.org/details/preussischeswrt05frisgoog/page/n411/mode/2up?q=Knickebein H. Frischbier: Preussisches Wörterbuch. Ost- und westpreussische Provinzialismen in alphabetischer Folge. Erster Band, A-K. Berlin, 1882.
  11. https://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/bpt6k65442310/f596.image.r=knickebein Urban Dubois: Cuisine de tous les pays. 3e édition. Paris, 1872.
  12. https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barbara_von_Nikomedien#Schutzpatronin_der_Artillerie Barbara von Nikomedien.
  13. https://archive.org/details/b21504696/page/162/mode/2up?q=Knickebein Anonymus: Blühers Rechtschreibung der Speisen und Getränke. Alphabetisches Fachlexikon. Französisch-Deutsch-Englisch (und andere Sprachen). Leipzig, 1899.
  14. https://www.google.de/books/edition/Oeconomische_Oekonomisch_technologische/tckUAAAAQAAJ?hl=de&gbpv=1&dq=knickebein&pg=PA374&printsec=frontcover Johann Georg Krünitz: Oekonomisch-technologische Encyklopädie, oder allgemeines System der Stats- Stadt- Haus- und Land-Wirthschaft, und der Kunst-Geschichte, in alphabetischer Ordnung. Einundvierzigster Theil, von Klu bis Nky. Berlin, 1787.
  15. https://www.google.de/books/edition/Nach_dem_Zapfenstreiche/GzOwpFovHioC?hl=de&gbpv=1&dq=knickebein&pg=PA39&printsec=frontcover Anonymus: Nach dem Zapfenstreiche. Erzählungen der besten Militär-Schriftsteller. Separat-Ausdruck aus der österreichischen Militärzeitung „Der Kamerad.“ Fünftes Bändchen. Wien, 1867.
  16. https://www.google.de/books/edition/Archiv_f%C3%BCr_das_Studium_der_neueren_Spra/orM5AAAAMAAJ?hl=de&gbpv=1&dq=knickebein&pg=RA1-PA403&printsec=frontcover Ludwig Herrig (Hrsg.): Archiv für das Studium der neueren Sprachen und Literaturen. XXIII. Jahrgang, 43. Band. Braunschweig, 1868.
  17. https://www.google.de/books/edition/Poesie_der_Nieder_Sachsen_oder_allerhand/wppQAAAAcAAJ?hl=de&gbpv=1&dq=knickebein&pg=RA1-PA278&printsec=frontcover C. F. Weichmanns Poesie der Nieder-Sachsen, oder allerhand, mehrenteils noch nie gedruckte Gedichte von den berühmtesten Nieder-Sachsen, sonderlich einigen ansehnlichen Mit-Gliedern der vormals in Hamburg blühenden Teutsch-übenden Gesellschaft, mit deren Genehmhaltung zusammen getragen, und teils aus den actis MSS. derselben mitgeteilet … . Hamburg, 1725
  18. https://www.google.de/books/edition/Versuch_eines_vollst%C3%A4ndigen_grammatisch/BsVCAQAAMAAJ?hl=de&gbpv=1&dq=knickebein&pg=PA1663&printsec=frontcover Anonymus: Versuch eines vollständigen grammatisch-kritischen Wörterbuches Der Hochdeutschen Mundart, mit beständiger Vergleichung der übrigen Mundarten, besonders aber der oberdeutschen. Zweyter Theil, von F-K.Leipzig, 1775.
  19. https://www.google.de/books/edition/Das_Buch_vom_Wein/iyk7AQAAMAAJ?hl=de&gbpv=1&dq=knickebein&pg=PA148&printsec=frontcover Gustav Rawald: Das Buch vom Wein. Erfahrungen und Anweisungen über Anbau, Bereitung, Behandlung, Kenntniß und künstliche Verbesserung der Weine für Weinbauer, Weinhändler, Gastwirthe, Weintrinker etc. Leipzig, 1856.
  20. https://books.google.de/books?id=mVNNAAAAcAAJ&pg=RA5-PA19&lpg=RA5-PA19&dq=%22Conditorei-Besitzer+empfehle+ich+Maitrank-T%C3%B6nnchen%22&source=bl&ots=hQG7NS0qZv&sig=ACfU3U1a7Omj_4IiYsqYmcEtgMneLY_fmQ&hl=de&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwiYhtb73fSGAxUGgP0HHUiTDyQQ6AF6BAgKEAM#v=onepage&q=%22Conditorei-Besitzer%20empfehle%20ich%20Maitrank-T%C3%B6nnchen%22&f=false Berlinische Nachrichten von Staats- und gelehrten Sachen. No. 111, 14. May 1857.
  21. https://www.google.de/books/edition/P%C3%A4dagogisches_Archiv/tdFMAAAAcAAJ?hl=de&gbpv=1&dq=knickebein&pg=PA528&printsec=frontcover W. Langbein (Hrsg.): Pädagogisches Archiv. Centralorgan für Erziehung und Unterricht in Gymnasien, Realschulen und höheren Bürgerschulen. Dritter Band, Stettin, 1861.
  22. https://www.google.de/books/edition/Schweinfurter_Tagblatt/ibVDAAAAcAAJ?hl=de&gbpv=1&dq=knickebein&pg=PA1418&printsec=frontcover Schweinfurter Tagblatt. Nr. 208. 29. Dezember 1866.
  23. https://www.google.de/books/edition/Laibacher_Zeitung/rclax9YWGNQC?hl=de&gbpv=1&dq=knickebein&pg=PA1768&printsec=frontcover Intelligenzblatt zur Laibacher Zeitung Nr. 266, 20. November 1866.
  24. https://www.google.de/books/edition/Kriegsgefangen/1S4TAAAAQAAJ?hl=de&gbpv=1&dq=knickebein&pg=PA257&printsec=frontcover Theodor Fontane: Kriegsgefangen. Erlebtes 1870. Aus den Tagen der Okkupation. Eine Osterreise durch Nordfrankreich und Elsaß-Lothringen 1871.
  25. https://www.google.de/books/edition/Bericht_der_Gewerbeschule_zu_Basel/lEBaAAAAcAAJ?hl=de&gbpv=1&dq=knickebein&pg=PA16&printsec=frontcover Friedrich Becker: Bericht der Gewerbeschule zu Basel 1872-73. Basel, 1873.
  26. https://www.google.de/books/edition/Schriften_der_Naturforschenden_Gesellsch/wBUXAAAAYAAJ?hl=de&gbpv=1&dq=knickebein&pg=PA175&printsec=frontcover Schriften der Naturforschenden Gesellschaft in Danzig. Neue Folge. Sechsten Bandes drittes Heft. Danzig, 1886.
  27. https://www.google.de/books/edition/Genealogisches_Handbuch_b%C3%BCrgerlicher_Fa/YsPTDwAAQBAJ?hl=de&gbpv=1&dq=knickebein&pg=PA487&printsec=frontcover Deutsches Geschlechterbuch. Band 155. Achter Pommernband.
  28. https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Die_fromme_Helene Die fromme Helene.
  29. https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Niederdeutsche_Sprache Niederdeutsche Sprache.
  30. https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kniefehlstellung Kniefehlstellung.
  31. http://www.zeno.org/Meyers-1905/A/Knickebein Meyers Großes Konversations-Lexikon, 6. Auflage 1905–1909
  32. https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Knickebein Knickebein.
  33. https://www.dwds.de/r/plot/?view=1&corpus=dta%2Bdwds&norm=date%2Bclass&smooth=spline&genres=0&grand=1&slice=10&prune=0&window=3&wbase=0&logavg=0&logscale=0&xrange=1600%3A1999&q1=Knickebein Knickebein – Verlaufskurve.
  34. https://www.delpher.nl/nl/kranten/view?query=knickebein&coll=ddd&page=1&sortfield=date&identifier=ddd:010087081:mpeg21:a0017&resultsidentifier=ddd:010087081:mpeg21:a0017&rowid=1 Algemeen Handelsblad. Amsterdam, 19.6.1858.
  35. https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84026860/1868-10-26/ed-1/seq-2/#date1=1777&sort=date&rows=20&words=Knickebeine&searchType=basic&sequence=0&index=0&state=&date2=1963&proxtext=knickebein&y=0&x=0&dateFilterType=yearRange&page=1 Täglicher Baltimore Wecker. 26. October 1868, Seite 2.
  36. https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85033492/1874-01-27/ed-1/seq-2/#date1=1777&sort=date&rows=20&words=Knickebein&searchType=basic&sequence=0&index=2&state=&date2=1963&proxtext=knickebein&y=0&x=0&dateFilterType=yearRange&page=1 Illinois Staats-Zeitung, 27. January 1874, Seite 2.
  37. https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85033492/1893-10-16/ed-2/seq-3/#date1=1777&sort=date&rows=20&words=Knickebein&searchType=basic&sequence=0&index=17&state=&date2=1963&proxtext=knickebein&y=0&x=0&dateFilterType=yearRange&page=2 Illinois Staats-Zeitung 16. October 1893, Seite 11.
  38. Hans Schönfeld & John Leybold: Lexikon der Getränke (circa 3000 Erklärungen von Getränken verschiedener Nationen.). 1. Auflage. Köln, Leybold & Schönfeld, 1913.
  39. https://archive.org/details/bub_gb_Z5soAAAAYAAJ/page/n103/mode/2up Wilhelm Busch: Die Fromme Helene. München, 1899.
  40. Leo Engel: American & Other Drinks. Upwards of Two Hundred of The Most Approved Recipes, for Making The Principal Beverages Used in The United States and Elsewhere. London, Tinsley Brothers, London, 1878.
  41. Anonymus: Bowlen und Pünsche zum Manöver- und Feldgebrauch der deutschen Armee. Ein Rezeptbüchlein zur Bereitung von allerlei stärkenden Getränken, gesammelt aus den Kursen der Feldartillerie-Schießschule zu Jüterbog. Mit einem Anhange gastronomischen Inhaltes. Ohne Ort (Leipzig?), Ohne Jahr. 1890?
  42. Anonymus: Hegenbarth’s Bowlen-, Punsch-, und Kaffee-Haus-Getränkebuch. Eine Sammlung zeitgemäßer Vorschriften zu Herstellung von kalten, warmen und sonstigen Mischgetränken. Mit besonderer Berücksichtigung der in- und ausländischen Kaffeehaus-Getränke, der „american drinks“, sowie Äpfel- und sonstiger Frucht-Bowlen und Punsche. 3. Auflage. Dresden-Plauen, Max Hegebarth’s Verlag, 1903.
  43. Jerry Thomas: How to Mix Drinks, Or, The Bon-vivant’s Companion, Containing Clear and Reliable Directions for Mixing All the Beverages Used in the United States, Together with the Most Popular British, French, German, Italian, Russian, and Spanish Recipes, Embracing Punches, Juleps, Cobblers, Etc., Etc., Etc., in Endless Variety. To Which is Appended a Manual For The Manufacture of Cordials, Liquors, Fancy Syrups, Etc., Etc., After the Most Approved Methods Now Used in the Destillation of Liquors and Beverages, Designed For the Special Use of Manufacturers and Dealers in Wines and Spirits, Grocers, Tavern-Keepers, and Private Families, the Same Being Adapted to the Tteade of The United States and Canadas. The Whole Containing Over 600 Valuable Recipes by Christian Schultz. New York, Dick & Fitzgerald, 1862.
  44. https://archive.org/details/schein-und-sein/page/128/mode/2up?q=%22Doch+wer+zufrieden+und+vergn%C3%BCgt%22 Wilhelm Busch: Schein und Sein. Bertelsmann Lesering.
  45. https://euvs-vintage-cocktail-books.cld.bz/1908-The-World-s-Drinks-and-How-to-Miw-Them-by-Hon-Wm-Boothby-1st-edition William Boothby: The World’s Drinks and How to Mix Them. San Francisco, H. S. Crocker Company, Sacramento, 1908.

Historical recipes

We have not included a comprehensive collection of recipes for the Knickebein at this point, as it would not really add any value; the definition of what a Knickebein is is also possible without it. However, we have selected a few exemplary recipes from selected recipe books. As the Knickebein has German origins, we have limited ourselves to the information provided by authors of German descent. They will certainly have known best how to prepare and drink a Knickebein.

1878 Leo Engel: American & Other Drinks. Seite 73. Leo’s Knickebein.

Keep a mixture ready made to hand, thoroughly combined, of
the following, in the proportions given: — One-third each of
Curaçoa, Noyeau, and Maraschino. When mixing a drink, fill a
straw-stem port-wine glass two-thirds full of the above mixture,
float the unbroken yolk of a new-laid egg on the surface of the
liquor, then build up a kind of pyramid with the whisked white of
the same egg on the surface of the latter, dash a few drops of
Angostura bitters, and drink as directed.
DIRECTIONS FOR TAKING THE KNICKEBEIN.
Registered.
1. Pass the glass under the Nostrils and Inhale the Flavour.—
Pause.
2. Hold the glass perpendicularly, close under your mouth,
open it wide, and suck the froth by drawing a Deep Breath.—Pause
again.
3. Point the lips and take one-third of the liquid contents
remaining in the glass without touching the yolk.—Pause once
more.
4. Straighten the body, throw the head backward, swallow the
contents remaining in the glass all at once, at the same time
breaking the yolk in your mouth.

1882 Harry Johnson: New and Improved Bartender’s Manual. Seite 52. Knickerbein.

(Use a sherry wine glass.)
Particular attention must be paid to the above drink
as well, as to the Pousse Cafe, to prevent the liquors
from running into each other, and that the yolk of the
egg, as well as the different liquors are separate from
each other; mix as follows:
One-third sherry wine glass Vanilla;
1 fresh egg (the yolk only); cover the egg with Ben-
edictine;
One-third sherry wine glass Kümmel;
1 or 2 drops bitters (Angostura); and serve.

1882 Harry Johnson: New and Improved Bartender’s Manual. Seite 133. Knickerbein.

(Gebrauche ein Sherry-Weinglas.)
Eine besondere Vorsicht beim Präpariren dieses Ge-
tränkes muss beobachtet werden, dass beim Eingiessen
der resp. Liqueure solche nicht in einander laufen, son-
dern getrennt im Glase bleiben, da dies dem Getränk
ein appetitliches Aussehen verleiht. Der Eidotter muss
aus vorstehendem Grunde selbstverstandlich ganz in
das Glas gebracht werden und darf nicht verlaufen.
Eindrittel Sherryglas Vanilla;
1 frischen Eidotter;
giesse ein wenig Benedictiner über den Eidotter;
Eindrittel Sherrywein-Glas Kümmel;
1 oder 2 Tropfen Angostura Bitters, und servire es.

1888 Harry Johnson: New and Improved Illustrated Bartender’s Manual. Seite 52. Knickerbein.

(Use a Sherry wine glass.)
Sherry wine glass vanilla;
1 fresh egg (the yolk only); cover the egg with
Benedictine ;
1/3 Sherry wine glass of Kirschwasser or Cognac;
4 to 6 drops of Bitters; (Boker’s genuine only.)
Particular care must be taken with the above
drink, the same as with Pousse Café, to prevent the
liquors from running into each other, so that the
yolk of the egg, and the different liquors are kept
separated from each other.

1888 Harry Johnson: New and Improved Illustrated Bartender’s Manual. Seite 159. Knickerbein.

(Gebrauche ein Sherry Weinglas.)
1/3 Weinglas Vanilla;
1 frischer Eidotter;
füge auf dieses ein wenig Benedictine;
1/3 Weinglas Kirschwasser oder Cognac;
3 oder 4 Tropfen Bitters, (Boker’s genuine only);
Besondere Vorsicht muss bei diesem Getränk beo-
bachtet werden, dass beim Eingiessen der resp. Li-
quöre diese nicht in einander laufen, sondern im
Glase getrennt bleiben, da dies dem Getränk ein
appetitliches Aussehen verleiht. Der Eidotter muss
aus demselben Grunde ganz in das Glas gebracht
werden und darf nicht verlaufen.

1890 Anonymus: Bowlen und Pünsche zum Manöver- und Feldgebrauch. Seite 77. Der Knickebein.

Der Knickebein ist ein wunderbares Getränk, das
sich in allen Lebenslagen vorzüglich bewährt hat:
im Sommer wie im Winter, bei Frost und Hitze,
nach des Tages Last und Arbeit, früh nüchtern,
wie spät abends nach feuchtfröhlchem Gelage;
auch kann man Knickebein für jede Geschmacks-
richtung herstellen: fein und lieblich für die Damen,
stark und kräftig für die Jünger der St. Barbara.
Der Knickebein wird bereitet, indem man den
schlanken Kelch eines Glases, mit einem Likör
gefüllt, durch ein ganz frisches Eidotter, von dem
alles Eiweiß entfernt ist, verschließt und darüber
einen andern Likör nachfüllt.
Der Knickebein dürfte aus Frankreich zu uns
gekommen sein, dort ist er unter dem Namen
Pousse l’amour (scil. für Knickebein) von alters
her bekannt.
Bewährte Mischungen sind folgende:
unten:           oben:
Rosenlikör — Maraschino
Cherry Brandy — Allasch
(beide auch für Damen)
Cherry Brandy — Benediktiner
Cherry Brandy — Danziger Goldwasser
Cherry Brandy — Grüne Pomeranze
Chartreuse — Kognak
Curaçao, grün — Kognak
Benediktiner — Kognak
Cordial Médoc — Kognak
Cordial Médoc — Kirschwasser
(letzteres für besonders ausgepichte Kehlen)
Aromatique — Kornbranntwein
Kümmel — Kornbranntwein
(fürs Manöver, wenn andere Schnäpse nicht zu
bekommen sind).

Knickebein des 1. Sächsischen Feldartillerie-Regiments Nr. 12.
Knickebein des 1. Sächsischen Feldartillerie-Regiments Nr. 12.

1890 Anonymus: Bowlen und Pünsche zum Manöver- und Feldgebrauch. Seite 80. Pousse L’Amour.

(Gebrauche ein Sherryweinglas.)
Dieses altfranzösische Getränk hat einige Aehn-
lichkeit mit Pousse Cafe und muß mit ebenso-
großer Vorsicht zubereitet werden. Man fülle
schichtenweise wie folgt: ein viertel Sherryweinglas
Maraschino, ein frischer, kalter Eidotter, ein viertel
Sherryweinglas Vanilla (grün), ein viertel Wein-
glas Kognac. Die größte Vorsicht muß bei der
Mischung dieses Getränks angewendet werden,
so daß der Eidotter ganz bleibt und die Schnäpse
nicht neinander fließen.

1890 Anonymus: Bowlen und Pünsche zum Manöver- und Feldgebrauch. Seite 84. Pousse Cafe.

(Gebrauche ein Sherryweinglas.)
Ein drittel Weinglas Maraschino, ein drittel
Weinglas Curaçao (rot), ein drittel Wein-
glas franz. Kognak und servire. Vorsicht bei
Bereitung muß gebraucht werden, damit die ver-
schiedenen Liköre nicht zusammenlaufen. Dieses
Getränk ist vorzüglich nach dem Genusse von
schwarzem Kaffee.

1899 Anonymus: Hegenbarth’s Getränkebuch. Seite 37. Knickebein.

Verschiedene Liqueure in einem Glas und oben-
auf schwimmend ein Eigelb. Man achte darauf, dass
die verschiedenfarbigen Liqueure nicht zusammenlaufen.
Man nehme z. B. unten Curaçao oder Ingwer, dann
Chartreuse oder Cognac, dann das Ei, obenauf etwas
Cognac oder Rum.

1903 Anonymus: Hegenbarth’s Bowlen-, Punsch- und Kaffee-Haus-Getränkebuch. Seite 46. Knickebein.

Verschiedene Liköre schichtweise in einem Glas
und obenauf schwimmend ein Eigelb. Man achte dar-
auf, dass die verschiedenfarbigen Liköre nicht zu-
sammenlaufen. Man nehme z. B. unten Curaçao oder
Ingwer, dann Chartreuse, dann das Ei, obenauf etwas
Kognak oder Rum.
So lassen sich die verschiedensten Liköre zu-
sammenstellen, wobei besonders auf Abwechslung
der Farben zu achten ist. Die zuckerhaltigsten Li-
köre kommen immer unten hinein. So mische man
grüne Pomeranze mit rother Vanille, auch kräftige
Schnäpse, z. B. Aromatique mit Kümmel, obendrauf
Arrak oder Kognak.

1903 Anonymus: Hegenbarth’s Bowlen-, Punsch- und Kaffee-Haus-Getränkebuch. Seite 46. Pousse l’amour.

ist eine ähnliche beliebige Komposition, man möchte
sagen, es ist die französische Benennung des deutschen
„Knickbein“.

1909 Carl A. Seutter: Der Mixologist. Seite 80. Knickebein.

(Knickebein- oder Sherryglas.)
1/3 Glas Maraschino,
1 frisches Eigelb,
1/3 Glas Creme de Vanille,
einige Tropfen Cognac oder Angostura-Bitters.
Die Liköre müssen getrennt übereinander stehen.

1913 Hans Schönfeld & John Leybold: Lexikon der Getränke. Seite 41: Charles-Knickebein.

Gebrauche ein spitzes Südweinglas:
1/3 Noyeau rot, 1/3 Maraschino, 1/3 Chartreuse gelb,
gebe vorsichtig 1 frisches Eigelb in das Glas, so daß
die Liköre nicht durcheinander kommen. Obenauf gebe
das geschlagene Eiweiß und spritze einige Tropfen An-
gostura auf dasselbe.

1913 Hans Schönfeld & John Leybold: Lexikon der Getränke. Seite 122: Knickebein.

Dieses Getränk kann man in vielen Variationen
herstellen. In den engen Teil des Glases gebe man
den schweren Likör, darauf 1 Eigelb, von dem alles
Eiweiß entfernt und obenauf den leichteren Likör.
Unten:                                                             Oben:
Maraschino                                                    Rosenlikör
Allash                                                               Cherry – Brandy
Benedictine                                                    Cherry – Brandy
Danziger Goldwasser.                                  Cherry – Brandy
Pommeranzen – Bitter grün                       Cherry – Brandy
Cognac – Asbach                                            Chartreuse
Cognac – Asbach                                            Curacao grün
Cognac – Asbach                                            Benedictine
Cognac – Asbach                                            Creme d’Yvette
Cognac  -Asbach                                            Cordial Medoc
Kirschwasser                                                  Cordial Medoc
Kombranntwein                                            Kümmel
usw.                                                                   usw.

1913 Hans Schönfeld & John Leybold: Lexikon der Getränke. Seite 123: Knickebein.

Mampes Maraschino, Mampes Rosen – Creme,
Mampe – Eigelb, Elefanten – Cognac.

1913 Jacques Straub: A Complete manual of Mixed Drinks. Seite 93. Knickerbein.

1/2 Jigger Benedictine.
1 Yolk of Egg.
3 Dashes Kummel.
1 Dash Angostura Bitters.
Use Sherry gass and see that different
ingredients are not mixed.

1917 Hugo R. Ensslin: Recipes for Mixed Drinks. Seite 61. Knickerbein.

Use Port Wine glass.
1/2 pony Grenadine Syrup
1/2 pony Maraschino
Yolk of 1 Egg
Top with Brandy
Keep ingredients separate as in a Pousse Cafe.

explicit capitulum
*

About

Hi, I'm Armin and in my spare time I want to promote bar culture as a blogger, freelance journalist and Bildungstrinker (you want to know what the latter is? Then check out "About us"). My focus is on researching the history of mixed drinks. If I have ever left out a source you know of, and you think it should be considered, I look forward to hearing about it from you to learn something new. English is not my first language, but I hope that the translated texts are easy to understand. If there is any incomprehensibility, please let me know so that I can improve it.

0 comments on “The socio-cultural history of the Pousse Café. Part 9: Knickebein

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *