Drinks

B&B

B&B.

According to the commonly accepted explanations, the B&B originated in the 1930s in New York’s “21 Club”. As we discovered during our research, this is demonstrably not the case. Nor was it created in the USA, but – as it seems – in Hamburg-Altona on the occasion of the Franco-Prussian War of 1870/71.

60 ml Park XO cognac
20 ml Bénédictine

Preparation: Prepare in a tumbler and serve with a large piece of ice.

What do people think they know about the B&B?

In our search for the origin of the B&B, we came across the explanation that it was invented in 1937 – other sources speak of the early 1930s – by a bartender at New York’s “21 Club”. It quickly became so popular that the company Bénédictine began to bottle and sell the drink in ready-mixed form as early as 1938. This mix is still available in the USA today and its sales volumes have exceeded those of Bénédictine liqueur since 1957. [1] [2]

There are different views as to the preparation. Some take two parts of a strong cognac and mix it with one part of Bénédictine on ice cubes in a heavy tumbler. For others, however, it goes without saying that the drink should be served cold, without ice, and not in a tumbler. There are also those who say that the B&B was originally prepared as a pousse café, i.e. the two components were piled on top of each other in a narrow glass. In this case, the heavier Bénédictine lies under the lighter brandy and the drink is served warm. But not only the way of serving, but also the mixing ratio is discussed. In this context, one reads that the original mixing ratio consisted of equal parts. And there is also disagreement about the ingredients. Apparently, most people are of the opinion that a cognac does not belong in the B&B, but a (Spanish) brandy. [1] [2]

What do historical sources tell us?

So weit – so gut. Doch wie sieht es wirklich aus? Wie sollte ein B&B zubereitet werden, woraus sollte er bestehen, wo und wann entstand er? Hier hilft einmal mehr der Blick in historische Quellen.

The first mention of the name “Bénédictine and Brandy” (B&B)

So far – so good. But what does it really look like? How should a B&B be prepared, what should it consist of, where and when did it originate? Once again, a look at historical sources helps here.

Benedictine and Brandy. Raymond E. Sullivan, 1910.

Use cordial glass.
Put in two-thirds Benedictine,
Float one-third Brandy on top carefully so as
not to mix them.
Serve.

Benedictine and Brandy. Ernest P. Rawling, 1914.

Into a pony glass pour
one-half Benedictine
one-half fine old cognac.
These should not be mixed, but the
cognac should be poured carefully and
floated on top. An easy method of do-
ing this is to let it run slowly over the
back of a spoon.

So you put Benedictine in a small glass and slowly pour a good cognac over it with the aid of a spoon, taking care that the two spirits do not mix. This is how it is called for again and again in the years that follow, right up to the most recent times.

Pousse-Cafés

Thus, as a member of the pousse cafés, the B&B belongs to a very old beverage genre. Jerry Thomas already lists pousse cafés in his work published in 1862, and Harry Johnson describes them in detail in his “New and Improved bartender’s Manual” published in 1882. For him, the term pousse café is apparently associated with just one drink, but there are other pousses. He writes on page 114 about the Pousse-Café:

Pousse Café. Harry Johnson, 1882.

(Use a sherry wine glass.)
In mixing the above drink, which is a beverage drank
by the French as a great favorite, and also has become a
favorite in this country, it must be mixed very carefully,
as there are several liquors required in the preparation
of this drink, and should be made in a manner that
each portion will be separated from each other, there-
fore, I would suggest, that there would be used a
sherry wine glass for pouring in the liquors, instead of
a tea-spoon, it has a better appearance and takes less
time; mix as follows:
One-sixth glass of raspberry syrup
One-sixth glass of Marachino;
One-sixth glass of Vanilla;
One-sixth glass of Curacao (red);
One-sixth glass of Chartreuse (yellow)
One-sixth glass of brandy;
according to the above ingredients you will have your
glass filled.

Origin of the pousse café

What else does Harry Johnson tell us beyond the method of preparation? He tells us that these “layered drinks” are not only drunk by the Americans, but are also favourite drinks of the French. We may therefore assume that this method of preparation came to America from France and not vice versa, because the influence of American bar culture on Europe lies further in the future, especially after the beginning of Prohibition. If this drink genre was the darling of the French in 1882, it will already have had a long tradition there. The origins of these layered drinks seem to lie in Europe. Is there any further evidence for this?

First of all, we note that a pousse café – as Harry Johnson informs us – is highly recommended after a midday meal. The translation of “pousse-café” from French is “digestive liquor” [3] and supports Harry Johnson’s statement only too well. If these kinds of drinks were of European origin, they should also be found there in large numbers. We believe that this is so, and that we can prove it. They are perhaps not represented in the bar books to the extent that they were drunk, perhaps because they were ubiquitous and therefore did not require special attention, like the drinks that originated in America and were understood in Europe as something new and were therefore the focus of attention. In this context, the “Lexikon der Getränke” by Hans Schönfeld & John Leybold from 1913 is interesting. As a comprehensive encyclopaedia, it also lists the everyday drinks and goes into detail about the “regimental mixtures” drunk in the various regiments. For the drinks listed in the book, it always indicates how they are prepared and explicitly specifies the use of ice. In the regimental mixes, however, ice is not mentioned at all. This is obvious, because where would all the ice in the barracks or on campaigns have come from? These regimental mixes will therefore all have belonged to the category of pousse cafés, which can also be inferred from the ingredients used. If these mixtures were popular with the regiments and even each regiment had its own recipe – a total of 465 different mixtures are listed in the book – one may assume that the regimental mixtures were also consumed privately and after leaving the army and were generally known among the population.

The regimental mixtures

A perusal of these regimental mixtures reveals some surprising things, and we have included the interesting recipes in the appendix. Four regiments have as their “signature drink”, as we would probably call it today, a mixture of cognac and monastery liqueur:

  • Deutsch.-Ordens. Inf.-Regt., Deutsch-Eylau: 4/5 Cognac – Asbach, 1/5 Klosterlikör.
  • Ulanen-Regt. Graf Haeseler (2. Brand.), Saarburg: 2/3 Cognac – Asbach, 1/3 Klosterlikör.
  • Feldart.-Regt (4. Bad.), Lahr: 1/2 Cognac – Asbach, 1/2 Bols Klosterlikör.
  • Feldart.-Regt. (4. Lothr.), St. Avold: 1/3 Cognac – Asbach, 1/3 Klosterlikör.

These drinks are very close to a B&B. They use cognac and a monastery liqueur. Bénédictine may also be considered a monastery liqueur. Unfortunately, except in one case where the monastery liqueur of Bols is explicitly stated, we are not told which monastery liqueur was used.

The oldest recipe for a B&B

However, the search reveals further: one regiment explicitly uses “Bénédictine”:

Regiments-Mischung des Inf.-Regt. Graf Bose (1. Thür.), Altona.

3/4 Cognac – Asbach, 1/4 Benedictiner.

Reserve der 5. Comp. Inf. Regt. Graf Bose (1. Thür) Nr. 31, Altona, 1900-1902.
Reserve der 5. Comp. Inf. Regt. Graf Bose (1. Thür) Nr. 31, Altona, 1900-1902. [15]

This is clearly a B&B! It shows here – as with the other blends – that brandy in the old recipe books meant a cognac. In the USA, cognac was usually not explicitly stated, as brandy and cognac were considered synonymous. In Schönfeld & Leybold, on the other hand, we are fortunate that the information is more precise. It is also interesting to note that an “original” B&B was apparently to be made with a brandy from the house of Asbach, at least in 1913; Asbach was not founded until 1892.[10] If the regimental blend is older, a French cognac will probably have been used before.

But how old is this recipe of the B&B actually? The ” Lexikon der Getränke” (“Dictionary of Beverages”) dates from 1913. Mixtures are given for all regiments. These will not have been established only in 1913, but will go far back into the past, were perhaps even already established when a regiment was founded. Further research on regimental mixtures in general would certainly be interesting here.

The History of the 31st Infantry Regiment

At this point, let us only consider the history of the infantry regiment “Graf Bose”. This regiment was an infantry unit of the Prussian Army from 1812 to 1919. It entered the Prussian Army on 29 March 1815 as the “31st Infantry Regiment”, the foundation date of the regiment being 6 September 1812. It was repeatedly transferred to different locations and its designation was adapted. [4]

The Victoria Barracks in Altona.
The Victoria Barracks in Altona. [8]

After the end of the Franco-Prussian War, which took place from 1870 to 1871, and in which the 31st Infantry Regiment had been deployed, the regiment transferred to the IX Army Corps and moved into its new garrison in Altona in the Central and Cavalry Barracks on 3 July 1871. Soon after, the Victoria Barracks were built for the regiment. On 2 September 1873, the anniversary of Sedan’s surrender, Julius Bose, who had been commanding general of the XI Army Corps during the Franco-Prussian War, was appointed General of the Infantry and became commander of the 31st Infantry Regiment. Julius Bose was appointed to the rank of count (“Graf”) on 6 April 1880. After his death in 1894, the 31st Infantry Regiment received his name, “Graf Bose”. [4] [5]

General Julius Graf von Bose.
General Julius Graf von Bose. [7]

The history of the regiment suggests when the regiment started using the “B&B” as a regimental blend. Both the regiment and their namesake general, Count Bose, were in action during the Franco-Prussian War and thus have a connection to France. This explains the use of French products, cognac and bénédictine, in their regimental blend. When the regimental blend was created and for what purpose is open to speculation. Was it in 1871, when the location was moved to Altona? Was it in 1873, when Julius Bose was appointed General of the Infantry on the anniversary of Sedan’s surrender? Was it in 1894 when the regiment was given the name ” Graf Bose”? We don’t know, but 1873 seems most appropriate, as part of the celebrations on the anniversary of Sedan’s surrender.

Be that as it may, the blend cannot have been created before 1864. In that year, Bénédictine appeared on the market and 28,000 bottles were produced. By 1874, there were 170,000 bottles, three quarters of which were exported. [9]

Regardless of the year of origin of the regimental mixture, it can be said that the B&B most probably originated in Hamburg-Altona, even if not under this name. Who would have thought that? This Regimental Blend will probably not have been known in the USA, and the B&B will probably have been invented there – as is so often the case. However, according to our research, the regimental blend has the older rights, even if it does not yet bear the name that is common today.

Is this derivation correct?

Regarding our theory that the B&B is a child of the Franco-Prussian War, there is, as we found out after our postulation, another weighty proof from 1963. In his book “I cocktails” by Luigi Veronelli, contemporary witnesses are quoted. He writes the following about the B&B: „II B and B è uno short drink, non un cocktail, e come tale viene dato senza l’indicazione di categoria. La sua « storia » confidata nel 1911 dal colonnello Federico Gattorno ad un giovane commis di Rimini, ora maître al Savini, Guido Ferniani, ha origini tanto nobili che non può non essere ricordata. 1870, Sedan, furibonda battaglia della guerra franco-prussiana. L’unica bandiera strappata ai tedeschi lo fu dai volontari del corpo garibaldino, capeggiati da Garibaldi stesso. I francesi vollero festeggiare il generale e gli ufficiali del suo comando; eccoli organizzare, sul campo stesso delta battaglia, a Sedan, un cocktail-party ante litteram. Non furono scovate al momento che bottiglie di cognac e di bénédictine; si fece fifty fifty, metà e metà, e si brindò all’amicizia dei due popoli. Per lungo tempo lo short drink, metà cognac metà bénédictine, fu proprio chiamato Sedan. I barmen d’oltre Atlantico – di che cosa non sono capaci gli americani? – l’hanno ribattezzato B and B.“ He states that the B&B is a short drink, not a cocktail, and that Colonel Federico Gattorno entrusted its story to Guido Ferniani in 1911. Ferniani was a young commis in Rimini at the time and [at the time of publication] was maître d’ at the Savini. The story goes back to 1870, when a battle of the Franco-Prussian War raged in Sedan. The only flag snatched from the Germans was captured by volunteers of the Garibaldi Corps, led by General Garibaldi himself. The French then celebrated the general and his officers and organised a cocktail party on the battlefield in Sedan. At that time, bottles of cognac and Bénédictine would have been found. They would have mixed the contents in equal parts, and toasted the friendship between the two peoples. This short drink would have been called “Sedan” for a long time, and the barmen on the other side of the Atlantic would have simply renamed it “B&B”.

This is, of course, a very different story from the one we derived. According to the latter, the B&B is not a “German” drink, but a “French-Italian” one. But what is important is first of all the common ground that the B&B – or whatever it may be called – goes back to the Franco-Prussian War. But what about this alternative history? Could there be any truth in it?

Giuseppe Garibaldi in 1870.
Giuseppe Garibaldi in 1870. [14]

There was indeed an Italian volunteer corps. This was formed in 1870/71, during the Franco-Prussian War, by Garibaldi, supported by his sons and son-in-law. He used it to intervene unsuccessfully against the Germans in Burgundy. [12] This is precisely where the problem lies: Sedan is on the border with Germany, not Burgundy. Moreover, the French suffered a defeat, they capitulated and their emperor Napoléon III was taken prisoner. [13] So it is hardly likely that the French had a cocktail party on the battlefield of Sedan afterwards. What is one to make of this? Presumably some things have changed in memory, myths and legends have become mixed up, and so it has come about that the origin story has been handed down incorrectly. But as I said – the most important thing about this source is that it proves that there is a close connection between the B&B and the Franco-Prussian War, just as we have deduced.

The method of preparation

Ice comes into play relatively late in the B&B, we first found it in 1948. However, this does not seem to have been the rule, because even in the more recent recipes there is predominantly talk of serving the drink layered. But everyone may decide according to their own taste how the B&B should be prepared, with which mixing ratio, whether with or without ice, in a chilled or unchilled glass, whether layered or stirred, whether in a tumbler or small glass. A look at the historical recipes may provide some inspiration.

Sources
  1. http://mixology.eu/klassik/der-bb-cocktail-verstaubter-after-dinner-drink-oder-vergessener-klassiker/: Der B&B Cocktail. Verstaubter After Dinner Drink oder vergessener Klassiker? By Marco Beier, 15. October 2013.
  2. http://cocktailmusings.blogspot.de/2010/06/b-b.html: The B&B. By Ereich Empey, 11. June 2010.
  3. http://dict.leo.org/frde/index_de.html#/search=pousse-caf%C3%A9&searchLoc=0&resultOrder=basic&multiwordShowSingle=on&pos=3: Pousse-Café.
  4. https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Infanterie-Regiment_%E2%80%9EGraf_Bose%E2%80%9C_(1._Th%C3%BCringisches)_Nr._31: Infanterie-Regiment „Graf Bose“ (1. Thüringisches) Nr. 31.
  5. https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Julius_von_Bose: Julius von Bose.
  6. https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deutsch-Franz%C3%B6sischer_Krieg: Deutsch-Französischer Krieg.
  7. https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Julius_von_Bose.jpg: General Julius Graf von Bose.
  8. https://de.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Datei:IR31_%E2%80%93_Viktoria-Kaserne.jpg&filetimestamp=20120314142812&: Viktoria-Kaserne zur Zentarfeier 1812-1912.
  9. https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/B%C3%A9n%C3%A9dictine: Bénédictine.
  10. https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Asbach_Uralt: Asbach Uralt.
  11. https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Giuseppe_Garibaldi: Giuseppe Garibaldi.
  12. https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Schlacht_von_Sedan: Schlacht von Sedan.
  13. https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Giuseppe_Garibaldi_1870_Nadar.jpg: Giuseppe Garibaldi im Jahre 1970. Portrait von Félix Nadar.
  14. https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Datei:IR31_%E2%80%93_Passepartout.jpg Reserve der 5. Comp. Inf. Regt. Graf Bose (1. Thür) Nr. 31, Altona, 1900-1902.
B&B.
B&B.

Historical recipes

1910 Raymond E. Sullivan: The Barkeeper’s Manual. Seite 32. Benedictine and Brandy.

Use cordial glass.
Put in two-thirds Benedictine,
Float one-third Brandy on top carefully so as
not to mix them.
Serve.

1913 Hans Schönfeld & John Leybold: Lexikon der Getränke. Seite 178. Regiments-Mischungen #31, Inf.-Regt. Graf Bose (1. Thür.), Altona. 3/4 Cognac – Asbach, 1/4 Benedictiner.

1913 Hans Schönfeld & John Leybold: Lexikon der Getränke. Seite 178. Regiments-Mischungen #152, Deutsch.-Ordens. Inf.-Regt., Deutsch-Eylau.

4/5 Cognac – Asbach, 1/5 Klosterlikör.

1913 Hans Schönfeld & John Leybold: Lexikon der Getränke. Seite 192. Regiments-Mischungen, Ulanen #11, Ulanen-Regt. Graf Haeseler (2. Brand.), Saarburg.

2/3 Cognac – Asbach, 1/3 Klosterlikör.

1913 Hans Schönfeld & John Leybold: Lexikon der Getränke. Seite 196. Regiments-Mischungen, Feldartillerie-Regt. #66, Feldart.-Regt (4. Bad.), Lahr.

1/2 Cognac – Asbach, 1/2 Bols Klosterlikör.

1913 Hans Schönfeld & John Leybold: Lexikon der Getränke. Seite 197. Regiments-Mischungen, Feldartillerie-Regt. #70, Feldart.-Regt. (4. Lothr.), St. Avold.

1/3 Cognac – Asbach, 1/3 Klosterlikör.

1914 Ernest P. Rawling: Rawling’s Book of Mixed Drinks. Seite 79. Benedictine and Brandy.

Into a pony glass pour
one-half Benedictine
one-half fine old cognac.
These should not be mixed, but the
cognac should be poured carefully and
floated on top. An easy method of do-
ing this is to let it run slowly over the
back of a spoon.

1930 F. Koki: Cocktails. Half and Half.

Gebrauche ein Likörglas.
1/2 Glas Benediktiner,
1/2 ” guten Cognac,
nicht mischen!!

1933 George A. Lurie: Here’s How. Seite 149. Benedictine-Brandy.

Benedictine . . . . . . . 1/4 jigger Cognac . . . . . . . . . . . 1/4 jigger
Pour Benedictine into pony glass without ice, float cognac
over and serve with ice-water chaser.

1934 William T. Boothby: „Cocktail Bill“ Boothby’s World of Drinks. Seite 23. Beenbee.

Cognac . . . . . . . 1/2 jigger Benedictine . . . . . 1/2 jigger
Shake well with ice, strain into chilled cocktail glass, twist lemon peel
over and serve.

1934 William T. Boothby: „Cocktail Bill“ Boothby’y World of Drinks. Seite 236. Benedictine-Brandy.

Benedictine . . . . . . 1/4 jigger Cognac . . . . . . . . . 1/4 jigger
Pour Benedictine into pony glass without ice, float cognac over and serve
with ice-water chaser.

1935 Anonymus: Cocktail Memoirs of Fresco Lime. Seite 4. B and B.

1/2 Bénédictine, 1/2
Cognac brandy: This suave
sophisticated after-dinner drink has
a decided Continental vogue.

1937 John R. Iverson: Liquid Gems. Seite 108. B & B.

3/4 Benedictine
Top—Brandy (Cognac)
Served in Pousse Cafe glass.

Observations
This is an after-dinner drink of world-wide
renown. It is powerful, smooth and pleasing to
the palate. Benedictine is a French liqueur, of
somewhat higher alcoholic strength than most
cordials (90 proof). It was discovered, and, in its
origin, prepared by the monks of the ancient
Abbey of Fecamp, France, several hundred years
ago. The secrecy surrounding Benedictine has
been guarded so zealously that even today no one
other than the manufacturers knows how and
from what ingredients this liqueur is made. This
is also true of Chartreuse, which, however, is of
a much later origin.

1938 Bud Caroll: Popular Drinks of Today. Seite 30. Benedictine Brandy.

Benedictine . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 jigger Cognac . . . . . . . . . . . . 1/3 jigger
Pour benedictine into pony glass without ice, float
cognac over and serve with ice water chaser.

1938 Hyman Gale & Gerald F. Marco: The How and When. Seite 93. B and B Cocktail.

1/2 Benedictine
1/2 Cognac Brandy
Serve in Pony Glass

1939 Anonymus: Cuna del Daiquiri Cocktail. Seite 16. B and B.

1/2 Ounce of Benedictino.
1/2 Ounce Brandy.

1939 Anonymus: Floridita Cocktails. Seite 16. B and B.

1/2 Onza de Benedictino. 1/2 Ounce of Benedictino.
1/2 Onza de Cocñac. 1/2 Ounce Brandy.

1940 Anonymus: Recipes. Seite 35. Benedictine and Brandy (Known as B and B)

Use pousse cafe glass
3/4 glass Benedictine
1/4 glass Brandy

1940 Anonymus: Libro de cocina. Seite 146. Brandy Cocktail.

1/4 Curaçao
3/4 Cogñac
Agítese bien.

1940 Anonymus: Professional Mixing Guide. Seite 19. B and B (Benedictine and Brandy).

1/2 Benedictine and 1/2 Brandy. Pour
these into a pony glass and they will
blend of their own accord. (Bottled
B and B can be obtained, pre-
blended in France by the makers of
Benedictine.)

1944 Crosby Gaige: The Standard Cocktail Guide. Seite 78. B & B.

1/2 Benedictine
1/2 Brandy
Pour into Cordial glass and they will blend.

1943 Oscar Haimo: Cocktail Digest. Seite 24. B and B.

1/2 oz. Benedictine
1/2 oz. Brandy
Serve in cordial glass.

1944 Oscar Haimo: Cocktail Digest. Seite 30. B and B.

1⁄2 oz. Benedictine
1/2 oz. Brandy
Serve in cordial glass.

1946 Bill Kelly: The Roving Bartender. Seite 26. Benedictine and Brandy.

1/2 Benedictine
1/2 Brandy Liqueur Glass
Some people like to float the
brandy on top.

1946 Lucius Beebe: The Stork Club Bar Book. Seite 103. B and B.

1/2 oz. benedictine
1/2 oz. brandy
Serve in a cordial glass.

1946 Oscar Haimo: Cocktail and Wine Digest. Seite 35. B and B.

1/2 oz. Benedictine
1/2 oz. Brandy
Serve in cordial
glass.

1948 Hilario Alonso Sanchez: El Arte del Cantinero. Seite 371. Coctel Benedictine.

1/2 de Benedictine.
1/2 de brandy.
Hielo. Revuélvase, cuéle-
se y sírvase.

1948 Trader Vic: Bartender’s Guide. Seite 50. B and B.

1/2 bénédictine 1/2 cognac
Serve in liqueur glass.

1948 Trader Vic: Bartender’s Guide. Seite 50. Been Bee.

3/4 oz. cognac 3/4 oz. bénédictine
Shake with cracked ice; strain into chilled cocktail glass.

1949 Anonymus: Professional Mixing Guide. Seite 20. B and B (Benedictine and Brandy)

1/2 Benedictine and 1/2 Brandy.
Pour into a Pony glass and they
will blend.
(Bottled B and B can be obtained,
preblended by the makers of
Benedictine).

1953 Anonymus: Esquire’s Handbook for Hosts. Seite 153. B & B.

1 part cognac
1 part Benedictine
Mix, pour into liqueur glass and serve
at room temperature.

1953 „Kappa“: Bartender’s Guide to Mixed Drinks. Seite 12. B & B.

1/2 oz. Benedictine
1/2 oz. Cognac
Use Cordial glass and carefully float the Cognac
on top of the Benedictine.

1953 Leo Cotton: Old Mr. Boston Official Bartender’s Guide. Seite 23. B & B.

1/2 oz. Benedictine
1/2 oz. Cognac
Use Cordial glass and carefully float
the Cognac on top of the Benedictine.

1953 Marcel et Roger Louc: Cocktails et Grand Crus. Seite 44. B. and B..

Dans un verre à liqueur
1/2 Cognac
1/2 Bénédictine.

1954 Marcel Pace: Nos Meilleures boissons. B. and B..

Dans le verre à liqueurs Into liqueur glass
1/2 BÉNÉDICTINE
1/2 COGNAC

1956 Patrick Gavin Duffy: The Official Mixer’s Manual. Seite 17. B. and B..

1/2 Brandy
1/2 Benedictine
Serve in a liqueur glass or iced
in a cocktail glass. This is an
after-dinner drink.

1956 Patrick Gavin Duffy: The Official Mixer’s Manual. Seite 72. B. and B..

1/2 Benedictine
1/2 Brandy
Serve in a liqueur glass or iced in
a cocktail glass. This is an after-
dinner drink.

1957 Henri Barman: Cocktails et autres boissons mélangées. Seite 22. B. et B..

1/2 Bénédictine
1/2 Cognac
Après le dîner servir dans
un verre à liqueur.

1957 Lawrence Blochman: Here’s How. Seite 98. B & B.

1 part Benedictine 1 part cognac
This is essentially an after-dinner drink, served in a
liqueur glass, with the brandy cutting the sweetness of
the Benedictine. However, it may be stirred with ice and
strained into a cocktail glass before dinner. В & В is
now bottled ready-mixed by the D.O.M. people.

1959 Anonymus: Manual de Cocteleria. #9. B and B.

En copa de cordial.
1/4 de Cogñac francés
1/2 de Benedictine

1960 Anonymus: Recetas para cocteles. Seite 18. B and B.

En copa de cordial.
1/4 de Coñac francés
1/2 de Benedictine

1960 Anonymus: Tout les cocktails et les boissons rafraichissante. Seite 20. Ballerine.

1/2 Cognac
1/2 Bénédictine

1963 Luigi Veronelli: I cocktails. Seite 79. B and B.

1 bicchiere di cognac
1 bicchiere di bénédictine
Versare direttamente nei bicchieri, riempiendoli metà con
cognac, metà con bénédictine. Servire.
II B and B è uno short drink, non un cocktail, e come tale
viene dato senza l’indicazione di categoria. La sua « sto-
ria » confidata nel 1911 dal colonnello Federico Gattorno
ad un giovane commis di Rimini, ora maître al Savini,
Guido Ferniani, ha origini tanto nobili che non può non
essere ricordata.
1870, Sedan, furibonda battaglia della guerra franco-prus-
siana. L’unica bandiera strappata ai tedeschi lo fu dai
volontari del corpo garibaldino, capeggiati da Garibaldi
stesso. I francesi vollero festeggiare il generale e gli uf-
ficiali del suo comando; eccoli organizzare, sul campo
stesso delta battaglia, a Sedan, un cocktail-party ante
litteram. Non furono scovate al momento che bottiglie di
cognac e di bénédictine; si fece fifty fifty, metà e metà,
e si brindò all’amicizia dei due popoli.
Per lungo tempo lo short drink, metà cognac metà béné-
dictine, fu proprio chiamato Sedan. I barmen d’oltre Atlan-
tico – di che cosa non sono capaci gli americani? – l’hanno
ribattezzato B and B.

1965 Aladar von Wesendonk: 888 Cocktails. Seite 68. B & B.

1/2 Remy Martin Cognac
1/2 Bénédictine D . O . M .
in Zimmertemperatur servieren

1965 Harry Schraemli: Manuel du bar. Seite 350. B and B.

Mélange apprécié en Amérique, qui consiste en un 1/2 verre à liqueur
de bénédictine et autant de cognac (Brandy) (total 25 g) servi dans
une coupe bien glacée. Ce mélange peut également être servi
comme cocktail. On met alors de la glace dans le verre mélangeur,
1/2 bénédictine et 1/2 cognac. Très bien remuer. (Le prix dans ce cas
coûte autant que pour 1 petit verre de bénédictine et 1 petit verre de
cognac, car on a besoin de 50 g pour faire un cocktail.)

1965 Robert London & Anne London: Cocktails and Snacks. Seite 71. B & B.

1/2 ounce Benedictine 1/2 ounce brandy
Blend in a liqueur glass.

1966 Harry Schraemli: Le roi du bar. Seite 28. B and B (Bénedictine et Brandy).

Coupe bien glacée ou «frozen glass». 1/2
bénédictine, 1/2 cognac. Servi comme
cocktail: Mixingglass. 1/2 bénédictine, 1/2
cognac.

1966 Oscar Haimo: Cocktail and Wine Digest. Seite 35. B and B.

1/2 oz. Benedictine, 1/2 oz. Brandy. Serve in cordial glass.

1968 Anonymus: The Dieter’s Drink Book. Seite 49. B&B.

1/2 oz. Benedictine
1/2 oz. brandy, 80 proof
Pour Benedictine into small liqueur glass. Float
brandy gently on top.

1971 Anonymus: Tropical Recipes. Standard Recipes. B. & B. (Benedictine & Brandy).

Liqueur Glass, 1 oz.
Fill 2/3rds full Benedictine
Float Brandy
NOTE: Inasmuch as these two
are near the same proof they
blend perfectly. There is
also a ready prepared bottled
product on the market.

1972 Leo Cotton: Old Mr. Boston. Seite 5. B & B.

1/2 oz. Benedictine
1/2 oz. Cognac
Use cordial glass and carefully float
the Cognac on top of the Benedictine.

1972 Trader Vic: Trader Vic’s Bartender’s Guide. Seite 249. B and B.

1/2 ounce Benedictine
1/2 ounce brandy
Pour Benedictine into small cordial glass. Carefully float
brandy on top of Benedictine.

1973 Oscar Haimo: Cocktail and Wine Digest. Seite 35. B and B.

1/2 oz. Benedictine, 1/2 oz. Brandy. Serve in Cordial glass.

1976 Harry Craddock: The Savoy Cocktail Book. Seite 25. B. and B..

1/2 Brandy.
1/2 Benedictine.
Serve in a liqueur glass or
iced in a cocktail glass.

1977 Stan Jones: Jones’ Complete Barguide. Seite 221. B and B.

Pony Glass Build
1/2 oz Benedictine
1/2 oz brandy

1977 Stan Jones: Jones’ Complete Barguide. Seite 225. Been Bee.

Cocktail Glass Stir
1-1/2 oz brandy
1 oz Benedictine

1980 Anonymus: Manual del bar. Seite 125. B and B.

25 gramos de Benedictine
25 gramos de Brandy
Colocar el Brandy flotando
sobre el Benedictine en
copa de licor.

2010 Colin Peter Field: The Ritz Paris. Seite 32. B&B. 6/10 Hennessy Cognac, 4/10 Bénédictine.

2011 Helmut Adam, Jens Hasenbein, Bastian Heuser: Cocktailian 1. Seite 475. B & B. 4 cl Brandy; 2 cl Bénédictine. Ins Gästeglas auf Eis geben, gut umrühren, mit Zitronenzeste garnieren.

explicit capitulum
*

About

Hi, I'm Armin and in my spare time I want to promote bar culture as a blogger, freelance journalist and Bildungstrinker (you want to know what the latter is? Then check out "About us"). My focus is on researching the history of mixed drinks. If I have ever left out a source you know of, and you think it should be considered, I look forward to hearing about it from you to learn something new. English is not my first language, but I hope that the translated texts are easy to understand. If there is any incomprehensibility, please let me know so that I can improve it.

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