Drinks

Punch, Toddy, Grog & Co. – Part 11: Negus

Negus.

The Negus was the drink of Francis Negus. In this post, we explain where the drink got its name and how to prepare it.

80 ml Thomas Henry Soda Water
40 ml Graham’s Tawny Port 20 years

Preparation: Prepare as a highball.

Note: This is our modern interpretation of a Negus.

When researching the Sangaree, we noticed that sometimes a Negus was said to be the same as a Sangaree. Therefore, we have also included the Negus in our analysis.

How did the Negus get its name?

Notes and Queries. London, 1854, page 10.
Notes and Queries. London, 1854, page 10. [16-10]

Before we chronologically follow those sources that describe the recipe of a Negus, we first address the question of how the Negus got its name. The oldest source we could find was published in 1849, but it refers to a document that must have been written before 1754. A letter to the editor was printed in the journal Notes and Queries: “Negus. – In a lately-published catalogue of books on sale by Mr. Kerslake of Bristol, I observe the following article, which may perhaps be deemed worthy of a place in your pages: “6915. The Annales of Tacitus, and Description of Germany, 1604, folio, old vellum wrapper, 16s. “This book has belonged to Thomas Vernon of Ashton, Bishop’s Waltham, Hants, 1704-1753, who has made use of the margins throughout the volume for the purpose of recording his observations, opinions, friendships, including also his will! On p. 269. is what appears to have been the origin of the word ‘Negus.’ – ‘After a morning’s walk, half a pint of white wine, made hot and sweetened a little, is recond very good, – Col. Negus, a gentn of taste, advices it, I have heard say.'” If I might add a Query upon this Note, it would be, Can any corroboration be given of the correctness of the ethymology? and is anything farther known of Colonel Negus? T. S. B. R. [Wine and water, it is said, first received the name of Negus from Colonel Francis Negus, who was commissioner from executing the office of Master of the Horse during the reign of George I.” [16-10] The Master of Horses was an important official in the service of the monarchy, after the Lord Steward and Lord Chamberlain of the Household, and was always a member of the Ministry, Peer and Privy Councillor. He was responsible for all matters relating to horses, stables, coach houses and stud farms. Francis Negus held this office from 1715 to 1727. [49] [50] [51] [56-168] The answer continues with: “Among other anecdotes related to him, one is, that party spirit running high at that period between Whigs and Tories, wine-bibing was resorted to as an excitement. On one occasion some leading Whigs and Tories having, par accident, got over their cups together, and Mr. Negus being present, and high words ensuing, he recommended them in future to dilute their wine, as he did, which suggestion fortunately directed their attention from an argument which probably would have ended seriously, to one of the merits of wine and water, which concluded by their nicknaming it Negus.” [16-10]

The Gentleman’s Magazine. London, 1798, page 119.
The Gentleman’s Magazine. London, 1798, page 119. [15-119]

One then refers to an article from the Gentleman’s Magazine of the year 1799, where a letter to the editor reads: “An enquiry having been frequently made after the etymology of the word Negus; and observing, in p. 931, a query of your correspondent S. K. “Whether the mixture of wine, water and sugar might not receive the name of Negus from some individual who improved upon, or invented (what he terms), the happy mixture;” and adds “that Negus is a familyname, as appears by your Obituary, p. 729;” it may not, perhaps, be disagreeable to your said correspondent to be informed, that his conjecture is right; that Negus is a family-name; and that the said liquor took its hame from an individual of that family; which the following relation (on the veracity of which you may depend) will, I think, ascertain. It is now nearly 30 years ago that, being on a visit to a friend at Frome, in Somersetshire, I accompanied my said friend to the house of a clergy-man of the name of Potter, who, with a wife and two daughters, then resided in a good family-house in a street (which I do not recollect the name of) near to the church. The house was decorated with many paintings, chiefly family portraits; amongst which I was particularly pleased with that of a gentleman in a military dress, which appeared, by the style, to have been taken in or about the reign of Queen Anne. In answer to my enquiries concerning the original of the portrait, Mrs. Potter informed me it was a Colonel Negus, an uncle of her husband’s; that from this gentleman the liquor usually so called had its name, it being his usual beverage. When in company with his junior officers, he used to invite them to join him, by saying, “Come, boys, join with me, taste my liquor.” Hence it soon became fashionable in the regiment, and the officers, in compliment to their colonel, called it Negus. Should either, or both the foregoing relations merit a place in your useful and intelligent Magazine, the insertion will oblige, M.A.C.” [15-119]

The Gentleman’s Magazine. London, 1798, page 931.
The Gentleman’s Magazine. London, 1798, page 931. [12-931]

For the sake of completeness, the aforementioned enquiry from 1798 is also quoted: “Might not the mixture of wine, water and sugar, &c. first receive its name of Negus from some tavern keeper, or other individual, of that name, who invented, or improved upon, the happy mixture? That Negus is a family name appears from your Obituary p. 729, a.” [12-931]

The Gentleman’s Magazine. London, 1798, page 755.
The Gentleman’s Magazine. London, 1798, page 755. [12-755]

Another article in the Gentleman’s Magazine from 1798 informs: “Negus is supposed to have been brought into fashion by, and taken its denomination from, Francis Negus, esq. who was commissioner for executing the office of master of the horse during the reign of George I.” [12-755]

Since Francis Negus died in 1732, [13] the mixed drink of the same name must have been created before 1732. He was a member of parliament from 1717 onwards. [13] [56-168] We may assume that he had been drinking wine with water for a very long time when the discussion about it arose in parliament. If the parliamentary anecdote is correct, the name “Negus” originated in the time of George I. However, since it was also said that the Negus was called this by his company, this could also have been the case in the time of Anne I, who ruled from 1702 onwards. [54] Some sources say this was so, [17-483] [17-484] [34] [55-56] but do not substantiate their statement further. Other sources, however, place the date of origin in the reign of George I. [55-56]

It is clearly stated that the drink preferred by Francis Negus was wine diluted with water. What do other sources understand by a Negus? And what are we to make of the fact that sugar was also brought into play?

The first mentions

The oldest reference we could find dates back to 1745, without further defining what exactly a Negus is, it is only said to be suitable as an alternative to a sage tea: “Sage Tea, or a draught of negus, would be a beneficial dilutant;”. [1-24]

In 1749 there is an explicit reference to drinking it hot. There is an account of someone going to a neighbouring tavern and ordering a very hot Negus: “stepp’d to a neighbouring Tavern, and bespoke a very hot Negus”. [2-225]

An account of 1754 then mentions a White Wine Negus: “After Supper we drank plentifull of Punch and White Wine Negus;“. [3-12]

In 1757, Madeira wine was used: “and a glass or two of Madeira wine made into Negus”. [4-215]

In general, one can note that the term Negus appears in print in the 1740s with a casual mention of having drunk a Negus. This suggests that the Negus was already common knowledge at that time, so that there was no need to explain it further.

In 1774 , a medicine book said to take plenty of an antiseptic drink, such as red wine Negus: “His drink ought to be generous, and of an antiseptic quality; as red wine negus, white wine whey, and such like.” [18-296].

The Port Wine Negus is mentioned for the first time in 1786. [19-142] [19-258]

Apart from wine and water, other ingredients for a Negus are also mentioned. Let us take a closer look at these in the following.

Orange juice and lemon juice

In 1801 it is recommended to drink the Negus warm, [5-333] and one defines: “Negus is a common beverage, and consists of diluted wine with the addition of juice of lemon or Seville orange.” [5-340]

This is the first indication that citrus juice should be put into a Negus.

In 1807 it is also written that one should put orange juice or another acid into a Negus: “negus, sharpened with the juice of orange” [52-24] or “weak negus acidulated with orange-juice, or some other vegetable acid.[52-119]

Nutmeg and other spices

A publication of the year 1807 also defines that a Negus is to be prepared with citrus juice: “Negus. This is a well known beverage, consisting of diluted wine, with the addition of the juice of lemons or Seville oranges.[6-322]

But they also say in a footnote: “Some have recommended a tumbler of negus made with madeira, or any kind of white wine, with a scrape of nutmeg, or a little pounded cinnamon“. [6-477]

This is an interesting finding. As we can see from the footnote, you can put cinnamon or nutmeg on your Negus, but it doesn’t actually belong, otherwise this would have been described in the older definitions of a Negus.

The addition of nutmeg and other spices therefore does not seem to be something that belongs in the original Negus recipe, because time and again it is written not only of a Negus, but of a Negus with nutmeg. If nutmeg were a basic component of a Negus, there would be no need to explicitly mention it in addition. For example, one writes 1809: wine negus, rendered grateful by the addition of a little nutmeg”. [21-178] Likewise, many other contributions are to be interpreted, for example 1822: “wine negus, with nutmeg.” [23-214] 1826: “Wine negus, with nutmeg.” [24-240] 1827: “wine negus with spices should be gradually given”. [26-78] 1828: “red-wine negus was the principal beverage, nutmegs were used.” [27-224] 1833: “port-wine negus well spiced.” [31-55] 1836: “port-wine negus with nutmeg”. [29-419] 1842: “red-wine negus with nutmeg”. [32-69] 1842: “wine negus, to which may be added a desert spoonful of either the tincture of ginger, or the compound tincture of cinnamon or cardamoms”. [33-56]

Notes and Queries. London, 1897, page 27.
Notes and Queries. London, 1897, page 27. [53-27]

A contribution in 1897 also confirms the assumption that the addition of nutmeg to a Negus was not in the original recipe, but was something that was added individually. An enquiry in July 1897 about a pocket nutmeg grater reads: “POCKET NUTMEG-GRATER. – I have taken the following extract from a local paper:- “Some interesting relics of Mrs. Siddons, the great actress, will be offered for sale shortly in a London auction mart. The collection includes a … pocket nutmeg-grater, … used … by Mrs. Siddons; …” It will be noticed that amongst the articles offered for sale is a “pocket nutmeg-grater.” I am anxious to know for what purpose ladies carried this article. That it was common at the beginning of this century is evident from occasional references to it. … J. H. Murray” [53-27]

This request received several responses, including this ones:

Notes and Queries. London, 1897, page 70.
Notes and Queries. London, 1897, page 70. [53-70]

“DR. MURRAY asks why ladies carried this article. It was doubtless to grate their nutmegs withal. Why they carried their nutmegs is the next question. It was probably to season to their own taste their evening tumbler of hot negus; which was commoner in Mrs. Siddon’s time than now. If yet a third question arises, Why, then, did not gentlemen also have nutmegs and graters? – there is a choice of three answers: (1) Perhaps they did; (2) Perhaps they borrowed from the ladies; (3, and most likely) Perhaps they preffered toddy and grog, which want lemon and sugar, but not nutmeg. C.F.S. WARREN, M.A. Longford, Coventry.” [53-70]

“Nutmeg-graters were formerly made in small fancy cases for the pockets. I have a distinct recollection of my grandmother (1757-1830) carrying one. EVERARD HOME COLEMAN. 71, Brecknock Road.” [53-70]

“I am well acquainted with one of these articles, of silver, not much bigger than a large thimble, with a receptacle for the nutmeg. An age of cheap (and wooden) nutmegs, an age which thinks little of sherry-negus and despises custards at evening parties, must be excused for not seeing how useful such an adjunct was to the equipment of a careful hostess. The grater I speak of belonged to my grandmother, daughter of a former canon of Christ Church. EDWARD H. MARSHALL, M.A. Hastings.” [53-70]

Was not this for use in connexion with negus and the like? W.C.B.[53-70]

So we see that at the beginning of the 19th century it was standard to carry your own nutmeg graters with you, not only to spice your Negus to your own taste.

One reason why nutmeg does not seem to have become popular until the beginning of the 19th century may also be related to the fact that the Dutch nutmeg monopoly was only broken at the end of the 18th century when it was conquered by the English. [59] This will certainly have made nutmeg more readily available and cheaper in London and the surrounding area. This is indirectly confirmed by the Cyclopaedia published in London in 1728. In the description of the punch given there, nutmeg is not mentioned, [60-910]and it is stated that the entire trade in nutmeg was in the hands of the Dutch East India Company. [60-644] Accordingly, they must have been expensive.

„The whole Commerce of Nutmegs is in the hands of the Dutch East-India Company.“ [60-644]

This nutmeg monopoly of the Dutch East India Company was only broken by the English at the end of the 18th century with the conquest of the Moluccas. [61] This could explain why pocket nutmeg graters were popular among British ladies at the same time.

The follow-up recipes

Over time, the general view of how to prepare a Negus changed. It kept its name, but was also prepared as a punch. In 1821, for example, it is written: “NEGUS, a well-known compound beverage, prepared of one part of Portwine, and two parts of water, to which is usually added a small quantity of sugar, lemon-peel, &c. This liquor is pleasant, especially if the juice of a Seville-orange be substituted for that of lemons.” [9-607]

In 1825, the preparation of Negus was described in a poem entitled “How to Make Negus”. It is made from wine, water, sugar, lemon juice, lemon zest and nutmeg. [11-433]

Mention should also be made of the recipe for the Negus given in Oxford Night Caps in 1827, which is listed in the appendix. There it is suggested that calf’s foot jelly should also be added to the Negus. [14-5] [14-6] [14-7] This view is also shared by an American publication from 1856, where one should prepare a port-wine Negus with a gelatin solution: “port-wine negus, with solutions of gelatin”. [25-174] There is also a note in 1841 to put poppy syrup in the Negus: “take a beaker of hot wine negus, with a table spoonful of the syrup of poppies in it.” [30-885] But even this poppy syrup is more of a curiosity, because it is a medicine that was administered together with a Negus.

By the way, a Spanish-English dictionary of 1815 translates Negus with Sangria: “negus, sangría“. [10-269] But we have already dealt with such errors in the article on the Sangaree.

Other spirits

In Negus, wine was replaced by other spirits and the mixture was still called Negus, although of course it is not. Fortunately, these aberrations are rare.

Gin

A letter dated 28 November 1775 says: “and we do nothing but drinking gin-negus”. [36-120] A medical essay in 1863 also recommends “gin-negus”. [37-725]

Rum

A letter dated 14 March 1828 says: “a bottle of rum negus soon warmed me”. [38-99] In 1849 a travel report says: “We … have been occasionally treated to sip of weak rum negus.” [39-31]

Whisky and whiskey

In 1840, one reports about the former alcoholic John Hogan: “Had drank hard for many years; for twenty years had never breakfasted; had no shoes; and not even a bundle of straw for his children. Eleven years ago, joined a temperance society, and kept to it for eight years. When the cholera came, he was very ill of it, and, on recovering, was recommended wine negus, which he thought so nasty, that he put whisky into it to qualify; and from this time, he drank as hard as ever. He then, 1837, took a vow against drinking, which he has strictly kept.” [28-208]

In 1841, this question is asked: “Oh, dear, oh, dear, – is there any whiskey negus?” [41-117] In 1843 it is said: “When Mr Kilroy’s waiter has drawn the window-curtains, brought the hot water for the whisky-negus, … the audience may be said to be assembled”. [40-207]  In 1851 there is talk of a well-edited tumbler of “whisky negus””. [42-173] In 1855 one writes: “Take a little whiskey negus to cheer your heart” [46-433] In 1864 one even reports that at the Viceroy in Dublin “Whisky-negus is given at the Castle balls.“ [43-397]

Brandy

In a report on a journey in 1849, the Brandy Negus is mentioned. [47-53]

Why the recipe changes?

The Edinburgh Monthly Magazine. Vol. 64. Edinburgh, 1849, page 546-547.
The Edinburgh Monthly Magazine. Vol. 64. Edinburgh, 1849, page 546-547. [35-546] [35-547]

Originally, a Negus was simply wine diluted with water. Later, sugar was added, citrus juice and spices. Such mixtures are no longer a Negus, despite their name. Why were these things added anyway? There is a very simple explanation. It is best to quote a conversation of the year 1813, because this explains it very vividly. It is about a journey that the author undertakes in the spring of 1813 with Portugal as his destination. He meets his friend Gingham in Falmouth on the way there. They dine together, and their conversation includes wine, and how to tell good wine from bad. Gingham, the wine connoisseur, recommends: “ “Well, sir,” said he, “mix with water – two-thirds water to one-third wine. Then try it.” “Well?” “If there is any bad taste in the wine, the mixing brings it out. Did you never notice in London, even if the port or sherry seems passable alone, when you water it the compound is truely horrid, too nauseous to drink?” “The fact is, though a moderate man, I am not very fond of watering wine.” “The fact is,” continued Gingham, “there is very little good wine to be got in London, always excepting such places, for instance, as the Chapter. When you return, after having tasted wine in the wine countries, you will be of my opinion. Much that you get is merely poor wine of the inferior growths, coloured, flavoured, and dressed up with bad brandy for the London market. That sort comes from abroad. Andmuch that you get is not wine at all, but a decoction; a vile decoction, sir; not a drop of wine in its composition. That sort is the London particular.” I felt that I was receiving ideas. “Now, sir,” said Gingham, “my cold-water test detects this. If what you get for wine is a decoction, a compound, and nothing but a compound, no wine in it, then the water – about two-thirds to one-third – detects the filthy reality. Add a lump or two of sugar, and you get as beastly a dose of physic as was ever made up in a doctor’s shop.” “Just such a dose,” I repied,” as I remember getting, now you mention it, as I came down here by the fast coach, at an inn where I asked, by way of a change, for a glass of cold white-wine negus. The slice of lemon was an improvement, having done duty before in a glass of gin punch.” “Shouldn’t wonder,” said Gingham. “And if what you buy for port and sherry be not absolutely a decoction, but only inferior wine made up, then the water equally acts as a detective. For the dilution has the effect of separating, so to speak, the respective tastes of the component parts – brings them out, sir; and you get each distinct. You get, on the one hand, the taste of the bad brandy, harsh, raw, and empyreumatic: and you get, on the other hand, the taste of the poor, paltry wine, wretched stuff, the true vino ordinario flavour, that makes you think at once of some dirty road-side Portuguese posada, swarming with fleas.” “But what if you water really good wine?” “Why, then,” said Gingham,” the flavour, though diluted, is still the flavour of good wine.” “ [35-544] [35-545] [35-546] [35-547]

After these words, it should be clear why sugar, citrus or spices were added to the Negus – because the wine used was of inferior quality. Then, however, the Negus stops being a Negus but turns into, for example, a Wine Punch.

Conclusion

The quoted conversation explains why the Negus was altered, why sugar, citrus or spices were added to the Negus – because the wine used was of inferior quality and sometimes there was no wine in it at all! If the report is to be believed, such “wine”, when diluted with water, became something horrible. The taste became unbearable, and so one could only help oneself with sugar, citrus juice and spices to make this mixture halfway bearable – one simply masked the bad flavours as best one could.

Francis Negus did not need this. He, as the third highest-ranking officer in the royal household, as well as his friends and fellow parliamentarians, were undoubtedly able to procure good wine that could easily be diluted with water. However, as this style of drinking became more popular and a drink for the masses, this was not possible for most and they had to mask the bad taste.

Incidentally, a Negus, i.e. wine diluted with water, is nothing unusual. People have been drinking wine this way for thousands of years. It was already standard in Greece in the eighth century before Christ. The containers in which the wine was diluted were called craters. [7] [8] [9] [22]

Michel de Montaigne also reports on this in his essays at the end of the 16th century: “I usually dilute my wine half with water, sometimes to a third. When I am at home, according to an old custom which my father’s doctor prescribed for him and himself, I mix the desired quantity already in the cellar two or three hours before applying it. It is said that King Amphictyon of Athens invented this method of watering down wine; I have witnessed quite a few arguments about whether it is useful or not. As far as adolescents are concerned, I think it is more moral and healthier if they do not drink wine before the age of sixteen to eighteen.[62-558]

But it was not only still water that was used to dilute wine. Since the 18th century, Schurlemurle or Schorlemorle has been used in Lower Bavaria to describe a mixture of wine and seltzer water. [44] At the latest with the invention of artificial soda water, this type of preparation became widespread. For example, in a novella of 1809 Philip drinks “wine and soda water”, [57-2] and Lord Byron in his Don Juan, published in 1819, “hock and soda-water“, i.e. Rhine wine with soda water. [45-209] But these two examples are nothing more than Negus prepared with soda-water. So it is not surprising that at some point there were also recipes for a Soda Negus. For example, in 1841 it is said that for a Soda Negus, port wine, sugar, cloves and grated nutmeg should be heated, but not boiled, and then soda water added. [58-126]

Analysis of the recipes from 1862

Since no recipes for a Negus made with soda have been handed down before 1862, we can state that the Negus was only found in two forms, first unspiced, then later also spiced, as

  • Classic Plain Negus: wine, water.
  • Classic Spiced Negus: wine, water, spice.

But how does it look in the recipes handed down in the books from 1862 onwards?

A Negus was initially always made from wine. In younger years, a distillate, or a mixture of distillate and wine, was occasionally used instead, as the following diagram shows:

Negus - Spirits.
Negus – Spirits.

However, the period from 1960 onwards should be treated with caution here. It seems as if a distillate was used in 30% of the cases. In fact, however, this is a statistical error. Only a few recipes have been handed down from this time, and in one book the Negus was listed with numerous different distillates, which counted individually in the diagram then show a false picture of the actual conditions. We must therefore take this error into account in our analysis.

We can therefore say that even in more recent times, with a few exceptions, a Negus was always prepared with wine. Where this is not the case, the mixed drink is no longer a Negus, despite its name.

This observation leads to the question of which wine was used.

Negus - Wine.
Negus – Wine.

We can see that port wine was preferred. Otherwise, a Madeira wine was requested or was not specified and indicated that a wine, white wine or sweet wine should be used. In one case, even vermouth was to be used.

Depending on how dogmatic one wants to be about what a Negus is, one can say that a Negus should be prepared with a red wine in general, or only with a port wine in particular.

What was the situation in the early days of the Negus, in the 18th and 19th centuries? Unfortunately, the old sources do not specify the type of wine. However, it is true that in England a lot of sherry and port was drunk.

After the military and trade treaty concluded between England and Portugal in 1703, the so-called Methuen Treaty, which among other things regulated the taxation of Portuguese wines, port wine became very popular in England. French wine, on the other hand, was unavailable due to the war. [20] [63] We may therefore assume that a Negus was originally prepared by Sir Francis Negus from Port wine, which was popular at the time. Port wine is usually a sweet wine.

That presents us with a problem. So a Negus also contains sugar from the port wine. How should we classify the Negus now? As a Wine Grog (i.e. without added sugar) or as a Winw Toddy (with added sugar). Both ways of looking at it are possible. The fact is that wine always contains sugar. A litre of dry wine can still contain up to nine grams of sugar. [64] This means that a completely sugar-free mixed drink cannot be prepared from wine. So, strictly scientifically speaking – and we must – a Negus is a Wine Toddy. You can add extra sugar, but then it is still an (even sweeter) Wine Toddy.

This statement in turn leads us to the question of whether one should or may use extra sugar when preparing a Negus. Let us recall the discussion from 1813. Sugar was only added to a wine if it was a bad and adulterated wine. Consequently, no additional sugar belongs in a Negus! Nevertheless, we still have to consider mixed drinks prepared in this way as Negus or Wine Toddy, because the presence of sugar is decisive for this classification.

Negus.
Negus.

A further examination of the recipes shows that mixed drinks with the designation ” Negus” were, however, mostly not prepared as Toddy, but erroneously as Punch. Citrus fruits, however, do not belong in a Negus; rather, a wine punch is a Sangaree, not a Negus.

The next post will be about something completely different, namely Hot Buttered Rum.

Sources
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  10. https://books.google.de/books?id=JN5DAAAAcAAJ&printsec=frontcover&hl=de&source=gbs_ge_summary_r&cad=0#v=onepage&q=negus&f=false L.J.A.McHenry: A new and improved Spanish grammar. 2. edition. London, 1815.
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  12. https://books.google.de/books?id=kUwDAAAAMAAJ&pg=PA755&lpg=PA755&dq=%22the+gentleman%27s+Magazine%22+francis+negus&source=bl&ots=8IIhtzO6WC&sig=ACfU3U3UJF9JHJuRRunXe0Xq9ApO867odA&hl=de&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwiU_cypsrXpAhWSC-wKHUJRCzEQ6AEwAHoECAoQAQ#v=onepage&q=%22the%20gentleman’s%20Magazine%22%20francis%20negus&f=false Anonymus: The Gentleman’s Magazine. 1798.
  13. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Francis_Negus: Francis Negus.
  14. Richard Cook: Oxford Night Caps. Being a Collection of Receipts for Making Various Beverages Used in the University. Oxford (Henry Slatter) & London (Longman, Rees, Orme, Brown, Green), 1827.
  15. https://books.google.de/books?id=_cZKAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA89&lpg=PA89&dq=%22gentleman%27s+Magazine%22+1799+negus&source=bl&ots=INxSh2s6M8&sig=ACfU3U2Xe0QGrUaO-NDnl4LD_GAS-Od9ew&hl=de&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwj6ssGHyrjpAhU4RhUIHZLtDY8Q6AEwAHoECAkQAQ#v=onepage&q=%22gentleman’s%20Magazine%22%201799%20negus&f=false Anonymus: The Gentleman’s Magazine. 1799.
  16. https://archive.org/details/notesqueries10unse/page/10/mode/2up/search/%22white+wine%22 Anonymus: Notes and Queries. Vol. 10. London, 1854.
  17. https://archive.org/details/p1criticalmiscella01dryduoft/page/484/mode/2up/search/negus Edmond Malone: Critical and miscellaneous prose works, now first collected: with notes and illustration; an account of the life and writings of the author, grounded on original and authentick documents; and a collection of his letters, the greater part of which has never before been published. Vol. 1, part 1. London, 1800.
  18. https://archive.org/details/b30547660/page/296/mode/2up/search/%22wine+negus%22?q=%22wine+negus%22 Willaim Buchan: Domestic Medicine: or, a Treatise on the Prevention and Cure of Disieases by Regimen and Simple Medicines. London; W. Strahan, T. Cadell, J. Balfour, W. Creech; 1774.
  19. https://archive.org/details/b21442563/page/142/mode/2up/search/%22wine+negus%22?q=%22wine+negus%22 Thomas Skeete: Experiments and observations on quilled and red Peruvian bark: among which are included, some remarkable effects arising from the action of common bark and magnesia upon each other: with remarks on the nature and mode of treatment of fevers, putrid sore-throat, rheumatism, scrophula, and other diseases; in order to ascertain the cases in which bark may be administered-either alone, or combined with other remedies-to the best advantage. To which is added, an appendix, on the cinchona caribbaea. London, J. Murray, 1786.
  20. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Port_wine Port wine.
  21. https://archive.org/details/observationsonso00burn/page/178/mode/2up/search/%22wine+negus%22?q=%22wine+negus%22 Allan Burns: Observations on some of the most frequent and important diseases of the heart; on aneurism of the thoracic aorta; on preternatural pulsation in the epigastric region: and on the unusual origin and distribution of some of the large arteries of the human body. Edinburgh & London; Thomas Bryce, John Murray, J. Callow; 1809.
  22. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Krater Krater.
  23. https://archive.org/details/s1id13297010/page/214/mode/2up/search/%22wine+negus%22?q=%22wine+negus%22 Anonymus: Dublin hospital reports and communications in medicine and surgery. Volume 3. Dublin, 1822.
  24. https://archive.org/details/b21914643/page/n249/mode/2up/search/%22wine+negus%22?q=%22wine+negus%22 Benjamin Travers: An inquiry concerning that disturbed state of the vital functions, usually denominated constitutional irritation. London, 1826.
  25. https://archive.org/details/americanjournalo32thor/page/174/mode/2up/search/%22wine+negus%22?q=%22wine+negus%22 Anonymus: The American journal of the medical sciences. New Series, vol. 32. Philadelphia, 1856.
  26. https://archive.org/details/encyclopediaedin05millrich/page/78/mode/2up/search/%22wine+negus%22?q=%22wine+negus%22 Anonymus: Encyclopedia Edinensis; or, Dictionary of arts, sciences, and literature. Volume 5. Edinburgh, 1827.
  27. https://archive.org/details/gri_33125007148113/page/n241/mode/2up/search/%22wine+negus%22?q=%22wine+negus%22 John Thomas Smith: Nollekens and his times: comprehending a life of that celebrated sculptor; and memoirs of several contemporary artists, from the time of Roubiliac, Hogarth, and Reynolds, to that of Fuseli, Flaxman, and Blake. Vol. 1. London, 1828.
  28. https://archive.org/details/taitsedinburghm19johngoog/page/n220/mode/2up/search/%22wine+negus%22?q=%22wine+negus%22 Anonymus: Taits’s Edinburgh Magazine. Vol. 7. Edinburgh, 1840.
  29. https://archive.org/details/metropolitan29unkngoog/page/n426/mode/2up/search/%22wine+negus%22?q=%22wine+negus%22 Anonymus: The Metropolitan. Vol. 17. London, 1836.
  30. https://archive.org/details/londonmedicalgaz28londuoft/page/884/mode/2up/search/%22wine+negus%22?q=%22wine+negus%22 Anonymus: The London Medical Gazette. Vol. 2. London, 1841.
  31. https://archive.org/details/londonmedicalga31unkngoog/page/n65/mode/2up/search/%22wine+negus%22?q=%22wine+negus%22 Anonymus: The London Medical Gazette. Vol. 11. London, 1833.
  32. https://archive.org/details/saintpetersburg02unkngoog/page/n73/mode/2up/search/%22wine+negus%22?q=%22wine+negus%22 Anonymus: The Saint Petersburg English Review of Literature, the Arts and Sciences. Vol. 3. St. Petersburg, 1842.
  33. https://archive.org/details/acyclopediadome00andrgoog/page/n69/mode/2up/search/%22wine+negus%22?q=%22wine+negus%22 Thomas Andrew: A cyclopedia of domestic medicine and surgery. Glasgow, Edinburgh, London, 1842.
  34. https://archive.org/details/socialhistorygr03goodgoog/page/n117/mode/2up/search/%22wine+negus%22?q=%22wine+negus%22 William Goodman: The social history of Great Britain during the reigns of the Stuarts, beginning with the seventeenth century. Vol. 2. New York, 1844.
  35. https://archive.org/details/edinburghmonthl09unkngoog/page/n556/mode/2up/search/%22wine+negus%22?q=%22wine+negus%22 Anonymus: The Edinburgh Monthly Magazine. Vol. 64. Edinburgh, 1849.
  36. https://archive.org/details/georgeselwynhisc03jess/page/120/mode/2up/search/%22gin+negus%22?q=%22gin+negus%22 John Heneage Jesse: George Selwyn and his contemporaries; with memoirs and notes. Vol. 3. London, 1844.
  37. https://archive.org/details/p2edinburghmedic08edinuoft/page/724/mode/2up/search/%22gin+negus%22?q=%22gin+negus%22 Anonymus: Edinburgh Medical Journal. Vol. 8, part 2. Edinburgh, 1863.
  38. https://archive.org/details/memoirofjohnhowe00peyt/page/98/mode/2up/search/%22rum+negus%22?q=%22rum+negus%22 J. Lewis Peyton: Memoir of John Howe Peyton, in sketches by his contemporaries, together with some of his public and private letters, etc., also a sketch of Ann M. Peyton. Staunton, 1894
  39. https://archive.org/details/losgringosorinsi01wise/page/30/mode/2up/search/%22rum+negus%22?q=%22rum+negus%22 Lieut. Wise: Los gringos: or, An inside view of Mexico and California, with wanderings in Peru, Chile, and Polynesia. New York, 1849.
  40. https://archive.org/details/in.ernet.dli.2015.527754/page/n213/mode/2up/search/%22whisky+negus%22?q=%22whisky+negus%22 W. M. Thackeray: The Irish Sketch Book. 1843.
  41. https://archive.org/details/charlesomalleyir00leveiala/page/n139/mode/2up/search/%22whiskey+negus%22?q=%22whiskey+negus%22 Harry Lorrequer (Hrsg.): Charles O’Malley, the Irish dragoon. Vol. 1. Dublin, 1841
  42. https://archive.org/details/in.ernet.dli.2015.39577/page/n183/mode/2up/search/negus William Kelly: An excursion to California over the prairy, rocky mountains, and great sierra nevada with a stroll through the diggings and ranches of that country. Vol 2. London, 1851.
  43. https://archive.org/details/blackwoodsedinb158unkngoog/page/n418/mode/2up/search/%22whisky+negus%22?q=%22whisky+negus%22 Anonymus: Blackwood’s Edinburgh Magazine. Vol. 94. Amerikanische Ausgabe Vol. 58. New York, 1864.
  44. https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Schorle Schorle.
  45. https://archive.org/details/donjuan21byro/page/n5/mode/2up/search/%22hock+and+soda%22?q=%22hock+and+soda%22 George Gordon Byron: Don Juan. London, 1819.
  46. https://archive.org/details/worksinwelshengl00talhuoft/page/432/mode/2up/search/%22whiskey+negus%22?q=%22whiskey+negus%22 Anonymus: The Works of Talhaiarn. London, 1855.
  47. https://archive.org/details/lettersandmemor05frougoog/page/n59/mode/2up/search/%22brandy+negus%22?q=%22brandy+negus%22 james Anthony Froude (Hrsg.): Letters and Memorials of Jane Welsh Carlyle. Vol. 2. London, 1883.
  48. Jerry Thomas: How to Mix Drinks, Or, The Bon-vivant’s Companion, Containing Clear and Reliable Directions for Mixing All the Beverages Used in the United States, Together with the Most Popular British, French, German, Italian, Russian, and Spanish Recipes, Embracing Punches, Juleps, Cobblers, Etc., Etc., Etc., in Endless Variety. To Which is Appended a Manual For The Manufacture of Cordials, Liquors, Fancy Syrups, Etc., Etc., After the Most Approved Methods Now Used in the Destillation of Liquors and Beverages, Designed For the Special Use of Manufacturers and Dealers in Wines and Spirits, Grocers, Tavern-Keepers, and Private Families, the Same Being Adapted to the Tteade of The United States and Canadas. The Whole Containing Over 600 Valuable Recipes by Christian Schultz. New York, Dick & Fitzgerald, 1862.
  49. https://www.british-history.ac.uk/office-holders/vol11/pp603-604 The stables: Master of the Horse 1660-1837.
  50. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Master_of_the_Horse Master of the Horse.
  51. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Masters_of_the_Horse List of Masters of the Horse.
  52. https://archive.org/details/b21359076/page/24/mode/2up/search/negus Robert Thomas: The modern practice of physic, which points out the characters, causes, symptoms, prognostic, morbid appearances, and improved method of treating, the diseases of all climates. 2. Ausgabe. London, 1807.
  53. https://archive.org/details/s8notesqueries12londuoft/page/26/mode/2up/search/negus Notes and Queries. London, 1897.
  54. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anne,_Queen_of_Great_Britain Anne, Queen of Great Britain.
  55. https://archive.org/details/notesqueries5621unse/page/56/mode/2up/search/%22Said+to+be+named+after+Colonel+Francis+Negus%22?q=%22Said+to+be+named+after+Colonel+Francis+Negus%22 Anonymus: Notes and Queries. Fifth Series, Vol. 6. London, 1876.
  56. https://archive.org/details/dictionaryofnati40stepuoft/page/168/mode/2up/search/negus Sidney Lee (Hrsg.): Dictionary of National Bibliography. Vol. 11. New York, 1894.
  57. https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=mdp.39015064001236&view=1up&seq=20 Anonymus: Sketches of character, or specimens of real life. A novel, in three volumes. Vol. 1. London, 1808.
  58. https://archive.org/details/b22019194_0001/page/126/mode/2up/search/%22soda+negus%22?q=%22soda+negus%22 Benson E. Hill: The epicure’s almanac; or diary of good living. London, 1841.
  59. https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Muskatnussbaum Muskatnussbaum.
  60. https://archive.org/details/gri_33125011134307/page/n529/mode/2up/search/punch E. Chambers: Cyclopaedia: or, an universal dictionary of arts and sciences; containing the things signify’d thereby, in the several arts, both liberal and mechanical, and the several sciences, human and divine: The figures, kinds, properties, productions, preparations, and uses of things natural and artificial; The rise, progress, and state of things ecclesiastical, civil, military, and commercial: With the several systems, sects, opinions, &c. among philosophers, divines, mathematicians, physicians, antiquaries, criticks, &c. Volume the second. London, 1728.
  61. https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Muskatnussbaum Muskatnussbaum.
  62. Michel de Montaigne: Essais. Erste moderne Gesamtübersetzung von Hans Stilett. Die Andere Bibliothek. ISBN 3-8218-4472-8. Eichborn Verlag, Frankfurt am Main, 1998.
  63. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Methuen_Treaty Methuen Treaty.
  64. https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Geschmacksangabe_(Wein) Geschmacksangabe (Wein).
Negus.
Negus.

Historical recipes

1821 A.F.M. Willich: The Domestic Encyclopedia. Seite 607. Negus.

NEGUS, a well-known compound be-
verage, prepared of one part of Port-
wine, and two parts of water, to which
is usually added a small quantity of
sugar, lemon-peel, &c.
This liquor is pleasant, especially if
the juice of a Seville-orange be substi-
tuted for that of lemons.

1827 Richard Cook: Oxford Night Caps. Seite 5. Negus.

Negus is a modern beverage, and, ac-
cording to Maloue, derives its name from
its inventor, Colonel Negus. Dr. Willich, in
his ” Lectures on Diet and Regimen,” says,
that Negus is one of the most innocent and
wholesome species of drink; especially if
Seville oranges be added to red port wine,
instead of lemons; and drunk moderately, it
possesses considerable virtues in strength-
ening the stomach; but, on account of the
volatile and heating oil in the orange peel,
Negus, if taken in great quantities, is more
stimulant and drying than pure wine.

1827 Richard Cook: Oxford Night Caps. Seite 6. White Wine Negus.

Extract the juice from the peeling of one
lemon, by rubbing loaf sugar on it; or cut
the peeling of a lemon extremely thin, and
pound it in a mortar. Cut two lemons into
thin slices; four glasses of calves-feet jelly
in a liquid state; small quantities of cinna-
mon, mace, cloves, and all-spice. Put the
whole into a jug, pour one quart of boiling
water upon it, cover the jug close, let it
stand a quarter of an hour, and then add
one bottle of boiling hot white wine. Grate
half a nutmeg into it, stir it well together,
sweeten it to your taste, and it is fit for use.
Seville oranges are not generally used at
Oxford in making Negus; when they are,
one orange is allowed to each bottle of
wine.

1827 Richard Cook: Oxford Night Caps. Seite 6. Cold White Wine Negus.

To make cold white wine Negus, let the
mixture stand until it is quite cold, and then
pour a bottle of white wine into it.
It is sometimes in the summer season
placed in a tub of ice; when that is done
it will be necessary to make the Negus
somewhat sweeter, as extreme cold detracts
from the sweetness of liquors.

1827 Richard Cook: Oxford Night Caps. Seite 7. Port Wine Negus.

In making port wine Negus, merely omit
the jelly; for when port wine comes in con-
tact with calves-feet jelly, it immediately
assumes a disagreeable muddy appearance.
Negus is not confined to any particular
sorts of wine; if the jelly is omitted, it can
be made with any, or several sorts mixed
together.

1835 Richard Cook: Oxford Night Caps. Seite 5. Negus.

Negus is a modern beverage, and, ac-
cording to Maloue, derives its name from
its inventor, Colonel Negus. Dr. Willich, in
his ” Lectures on Diet and Regimen,” says,
that Negus is one of the most innocent and
wholesome species of drink; especially if
Seville oranges be added to red port wine,
instead of lemons; and drunk moderately, it
possesses considerable virtues in strength-
ening the stomach; but, on account of the
volatile and heating oil in the orange peel,
Negus, if taken in great quantities, is more
stimulant and drying than pure wine.

1835 Richard Cook: Oxford Night Caps. Seite 6. White Wine Negus.

Extract the juice from the peeling of one
lemon, by rubbing loaf sugar on it; or cut
the peeling of a lemon extremely thin, and
pound it in a mortar. Cut two lemons into
thin slices; four glasses of calves-feet jelly
in a liquid state; small quantities of cinna-
mon, mace, cloves, and all-spice. Put the
whole into a jug, pour one quart of boiling
water upon it, cover the jug close, let it
stand a quarter of an hour, and then add
one bottle of boiling hot white wine. Grate
half a nutmeg into it, stir it well together,
sweeten it to your taste, and it is fit for use.
Seville oranges are not generally used at
Oxford in making Negus; when they are,
one orange is allowed to each bottle of
wine.

1835 Richard Cook: Oxford Night Caps. Seite 7. Cold White Wine Negus.

To make cold white wine Negus, let the
mixture stand until it is quite cold, and then
pour a bottle of white wine into it.
It is sometimes in the summer season
placed in a tub of ice; when that is done
it will be necessary to make the Negus
somewhat sweeter, as extreme cold detracts
from the sweetness of liquors.

1835 Richard Cook: Oxford Night Caps. Seite 7. Port Wine Negus.

In making port wine Negus, merely omit
the jelly; for when port wine comes in con-
tact with calves-feet jelly, it immediately
assumes a disagreeable muddy appearance.
Negus is not confined to any particular
sorts of wine; if the jelly is omitted, it can
be made with any, or several sorts mixed
together.

1847 Richard Cook: Oxford Night Caps. Seite 5. Negus.

Negus is a modern beverage, and, according
to Malone, derives its name from its inventor,
Colonel Negus. Dr. Willich, in his “Lectures
on Diet and Regimen,” says, that Negus is one
of the most innocent and wholesome species of
drink; especially if Seville oranges be added to
red port wine, instead of lemons; and drunk
moderately, it possesses considerable virtues in
strengthening the stomach; but, on account of
the volatile and heating oil in the orange peel,
Negus, if taken in great quantities, is more
stimulant and drying than pure wine.

1847 Richard Cook: Oxford Night Caps. Seite 6. White Wine Negus.

Extract the juice from the peeling of one
lemon, by tubbing loaf sugar on it; or cut the
peeling of a lemon extremely thin, and pound
it in a mortar. Cut two lemons into thin slices;
four glasses of calves-feet jelly in a liquid state;
small quantities of cinnamon, mace, cloves, and
all-spice. Put the whole into a jug, pour one
quart of boiling water upon it, cover the jug
close, let it stand a quarter of an hour, and
then add one bottle of boiling hot white
wine. Grate half a nutmeg into it, stir it
well together, sweeten it to your taste, and it
is fit for use.
Seville oranges are not generally used at
Oxford in making Negus; when they are, one
orange is allowed to each bottle of wine.

1847 Richard Cook: Oxford Night Caps. Seite 7. Cold White Wine Negus.

To make cold white wine Negus, let the
mixture stand until it is quite cold, and then
pour a bottle of white wine into it.
It is sometimes in the summer season placed
in a tub of ice; when that is done it will be
necessary to make the Negus somewhat sweeter,
as extreme cold detracts from the sweetness of
liquors.

1847 Richard Cook: Oxford Night Caps. Seite 7. Port Wine Negus.

In making port wine Negus, merely omit the
jelly; for when port wine comes in contact with
ealves-feet jelly, it immediately assumes a disagreeable
muddy appearance,
Negus is not confined to any particular sorts
of wine ; if the jelly is omitted, it can be made
with any, or several sorts mixed together.

1849 Alexis Soyer: The modern housewife or ménagère. Seite 395. Port Wine Negus. https://archive.org/details/b21527970/page/394/mode/2up/search/%22wine+negus%22?q=%22wine+negus%22

Take one quart of new port
wine, of a fruity character, one tablespoonful of spirit of cloves,
one teacupful of sugar, one lemon sliced, half a nutmeg grated,
pour over these two quarts of boiling water.

1851 Alexis Soyer: The modern housewife or ménagère. Seite 333. Port Wine Negus. https://archive.org/details/modernhousewifeo00soye/page/332/mode/2up/search/%22wine+negus%22?q=%22wine+negus%22

Take one quart of new port wine,
of a fruity character, one tablespoonful of spirit of cloves, one
teacupful of sugar, one lemon sliced, half a nutmeg grated,
pour over these two quarts of boiling water.

1851 Anonymus: Modern Domestic Cookery. Seite 611. Negus. https://archive.org/details/b21530932/page/610/mode/2up/search/negus?q=%22wine+negus%22

1 bottle of wine, 1/2 lb. of sugar, and a lemon sliced.
Pour 3 pints of boiling water upon this mixture, and grate
nutmeg to the taste.
Such is the common mode of making negus; for making a
single tumblerful, however, as many people prefer to do it in
their own way, perhaps a better plan is to use only half the
quantity of water, poured boiling hot upon the wine already
sweetened and flavoured with nutmeg: but having in it also
a large and very thin cut rind of Seville orange, which gives
it a very superior flavour, without any portion of the acid.
The negus may be made of either white or red wine; and,
if drunk cold, is called “sangaree.”

1851 E. Carter: The frugal cook. Seite 55. Port Wine Negus. https://archive.org/details/frugalcook00cartgoog/page/n70/mode/2up/search/%22wine+negus%22?q=%22wine+negus%22

To half a pint of port wine add a tea-spoonful of spirit of cloves, two
slices of lemon, and a little nutmeg grated, sweeten to palate, and then
add half a pint of water.

1853 Alexis Soyer: The modern housewife or ménagère. Seite 402. Port Wine Negus. https://archive.org/details/b28081493/page/402/mode/2up/search/%22wine+negus%22?q=%22wine+negus%22

Take one quart of new port
wine, of a fruity character, one tablespoonful of spirit of cloves,
one teacupful of sugar, one lemon sliced, half a nutmeg grated,
pour over these two quarts of boiling water.

1853 Anonymus: Modern Domestic Cookery. Seite 611. Negus. https://archive.org/details/b2153102x/page/582/mode/2up/search/%22wine+negus%22?q=%22wine+negus%22

1 bottle of wine, 1/2 lb. of sugar, and a lemon sliced.
Pour 3 pints of boiling water upon this mixture, and grate
nutmeg to the taste.
Such is the common mode of making negus; for making a
single tumblerful, however, as many people prefer to do it in
their own way, perhaps a better plan is to use only half the
quantity of water, poured boiling hot upon the wine already
sweetened and flavoured with nutmeg: but having in it also
a large and very thin cut rind of Seville orange, which gives
it a very superior flavour, without any portion of the acid.
The negus may be made of either white or red wine; and,
if drunk cold, is called “sangaree.”

1856 Alexis Soyer: The modern housewife or ménagère. Seite 402. Port Wine Negus. https://archive.org/details/memoirofjohnhowe00peyt/page/98/mode/2up/search/%22rum+negus%22?q=%22rum+negus%22

Take one quart of new port
wine, of a fruity character, one tablespoonful of spirit of cloves,
one teacupful of sugar, one lemon sliced, half a nutmeg grated,
pour over these two quarts of boiling water.

1858 Alexis Soyer: The modern housewife or ménagère. Seite 402. Port Wine Negus. https://archive.org/details/b21531973/page/402/mode/2up/search/%22wine+negus%22?q=%22wine+negus%22

Take one quart of new port
wine, of a fruity character, one tablespoonful of spirit of cloves,
one teacupful of sugar, one lemon sliced, half a nutmeg grated,
pour over these two quarts of boiling water.

1860 Richard Cook: Oxford Night Caps. Seite 5. Negus.

Hegus is a modern beverage, and, accord-
ing to Malone, derives its name from its
inventor. Colonel Negus. Dr. Willich, in
his “Lectures on Diet and Regimen,”
says, that Negus is one of the most inno-
cent and wholesome species of drink;
especially if Seville oranges be added to
red port wine, instead of lemons; and
drunk moderately, it possesses considerable
virtues in strengthening the stomach; but,
on account of the volatile and heating oil
in the orange peel, Negus, if taken in
great quantities, is more stimulant and
drying than pure wine.

1860 Richard Cook: Oxford Night Caps. Seite 6. White Wine Negus.

Extract the juice from the peeling of
one lemon, by rubbing loaf sugar on it;
or cut the peeling of a lemon extremely
thin, and pound it in a mortar. Cut two
lemons into thin slices; four glasses of
calves-feet jelly in a liquid state; small
quantities of cinnamon, mace, cloves, and
all-spice. Put the whole into a jug, pour
one quart of boiling water upon it, cover
the jug close, let it stand a quarter of an
hour, and then add one bottle of boiling
hot white wine. Grate half a nutmeg
into it, stir it well together, sweeten it to
your taste, and it is fit for use.
Seville oranges are not generally used at
Oxford in making Negus ; wken they are,
one orange is allowed to each bottle of wine.

1860 Richard Cook: Oxford Night Caps. Seite 7. Cold White Wine Negus.

To make cold white wine Negus, let the
mixture stand until it is quite cold, and then
pour a bottle of white wine into it.
It is sometimes in the summer season
placed in a tub of ice; when that is done it
will he necssary to make the Negus some
what sweeter, as extreme cold detracts from
the sweetness of liquors.

1860 Richard Cook: Oxford Night Caps. Seite 7. Port Wine Negus.

In making port wine Negus, merely omit
the jelly: for when port wine comes in con-
tact with calves-feet jelly, it immediately
assumes a disagreeable muddy appearance.
Negus is not confined to any particular
sorts of wine; if the jelly is omitted, it can
be made with any, or several sorts mixed
together.

1861 Alexis Soyer: The modern housewife or ménagère. Seite 402. Port Wine Negus. https://archive.org/details/b21531985/page/402/mode/2up/search/%22wine+negus%22?q=%22wine+negus%22

Take one quart of new port
wine, of a fruity character, one tablespoonful of spirit of cloves,
one teacupful of sugar, one lemon sliced, half a nutmeg grated,
pour over these two quarts of boiling water.

1861 Mrs. Beeton (Isabella Mary): The book of household management. Seite 890. Negus. https://archive.org/details/b20392758/page/890/mode/2up?q=negus

Ingredients. — To every pint of port wine allow 1 quart of
boiling water, 1/4 lb. of sugar, 1 lemon, grated nutmeg to taste.
Mode. — As this beverage is more usually drunk at children’s parties
than at any other, the wine need not be very old or expensive for the
purpose, a new fruity wine answering very well for it. Put the wine
into a jug, rub some lumps of sugar (equal to 1/4 lb.) on the lemon-rind
until all the yellow part of the skin is absorbed, then squeeze the
juice, and strain it. Add the sugar and lemon-juice to the port wine,
with the grated nutmeg; pour over it the boiling water, cover the jug,
and, when the beverage has cooled a little, it will be fit for use.
Negus may also be made of sherry, or any other sweet white wine,
but is more usually made of port than of any other beverage.
Sufficient. — Allow 1 pint of wine, with the other ingredients in
proportion, for a party of 9 or 10 children

1862 Jerry Thomas: How to Mix Drinks. Seite 62. Port Wine Negus.

To every pint of port wine allow:
1 quart of boiling water.
1/2 lb. of loaf-sugar.
1 lemon.
Grated nutmeg to taste.
Put the wine into a jug, rub some lumps of sugar (equal
to 1/4 lb.) on the lemon rind until all the yellow part of the
skin is absorbed, then squeeze the juice and strain it. Add
the sugar and lemon-juice to the port wine, with the grated
nutmeg; pour over it the boiling water, cover the jug, and
when the beverage has cooled a little, it will be fit for use.
Negus may also be made of sherry, or any other sweet
wine, but it is more usually made of port. This beverage
derives its name from Colonel Negus, who is said to have
invented it.

1862 Jerry Thomas: How to Mix Drinks. Seite 62. Port Wine Negus.

(Use small bar glass.)
1 wine-glass of port wine.
1 teaspoonful of sugar.
Fill tumbler one-third full with hot water.

1862 Jerry Thomas: How to Mix Drinks. Seite 63. Soda Negus.

A most refreshing and elegant beverage, particularly for
those who do not take punch or grog after supper, is
thus made:
Put half a pint of port wine, with four lumps of sugar,
three cloves, and enough grated nutmeg to cover a shil-
ling, into a saucepan; warm it well, but do not suffer it to
boil; pour it into a bowl or jug, and upon the warm wine
decant a bottle of soda-water. You will have an effer-
vescing and delicious negus by this means.

1862 Jerry Thomas: The Bartender’s Guide. Seite 62. Port Wine Negus.

To every pint of port wine allow:
1 quart of boiling water.
1/2 lb. of loaf-sugar.
1 lemon.
Grated nutmeg to taste.
Put the wine into a jug, rub some lumps of sugar (equal
to 1/4 lb.) on the lemon rind until all the yellow part of the
skin is absorbed, then squeeze the juice and strain it. Add
the sugar and lemon-juice to the port wine, with the grated
nutmeg; pour over it the boiling water, cover the jug, and
when the beverage has cooled a little, it will be fit for use.
Negus may also be made of sherry, or any other sweet
wine, but it is more usually made of port. This beverage
derives its name from Colonel Negus, who is said to have
invented it.

1862 Jerry Thomas: The Bartender’s Guide. Seite 62. Port Wine Negus.

(Use small bar glass.)
1 wine-glass of port wine.
1 teaspoonful of sugar.
Fill tumbler one-third full with hot water.

1862 Jerry Thomas: The Bartender’s Guide. Seite 63. Soda Negus.

A most refreshing and elegant beverage, particularly for
those who do not take punch or grog after supper, is
thus made:
Put half a pint of port wine, with four lumps of sugar,
three cloves, and enough grated nutmeg to cover a shil-
ling, into a saucepan; warm it well, but do not suffer it to
boil; pour it into a bowl or jug, and upon the warm wine
decant a bottle of soda-water. You will have an effer-
vescing and delicious negus by this means.

1864 Anonymus: The English aud Australian Cookery Book. Seite 267. Negus. https://archive.org/details/b28073812/page/266/mode/2up/search/%22whisky+negus%22?q=%22whisky+negus%22

Negus: wine and water, with sugar and nutmeg, named after Francis
Negus, Esq., in the drinking days of George I.
Mr. Negus was present at a drinking party of Whigs and Tories, and he recommended
them to dilute their wine with water, as he did. Hence wine and water came to be
designated negus; but Lever, in one of his works, makes a heroine (Miss Macan), when
taken bad, call for that nondescript drink, whisky-negus.
Sangaree, or Sangurorum. – The same liquor so called in our Eastern
Empire.

1864 Jerry Thomas: The Bartender’s Guide. Seite 62. Port Wine Negus.

To every pint of port wine allow:
1 quart of boiling water.
1/2 lb. of loaf-sugar.
1 lemon.
Grated nutmeg to taste.
Put the wine into a jug, rub some lumps of sugar (equal
to 1/4 lb.) on the lemon rind until all the yellow part of the
skin is absorbed, then squeeze the juice and strain it. Add
the sugar and lemon-juice to the port wine, with the grated
nutmeg; pour over it the boiling water, cover the jug, and
when the beverage has cooled a little, it will be fit for use.
Negus may also be made of sherry, or any other sweet
wine, but it is more usually made of port. This beverage
derives its name from Colonel Negus, who is said to have
invented it.

1864 Jerry Thomas: The Bartender’s Guide. Seite 62. Port Wine Negus.

(Use small bar glass.)
1 wine-glass of port wine.
1 teaspoonful of sugar.
Fill tumbler one-third full with hot water.

1864 Jerry Thomas: The Bartender’s Guide. Seite 63. Soda Negus.

A most refreshing and elegant beverage, particularly for
those who do not take punch or grog after supper, is
thus made:
Put half a pint of port wine, with four lumps of sugar,
three cloves, and enough grated nutmeg to cover a shil-
ling, into a saucepan; warm it well, but do not suffer it to
boil; pour it into a bowl or jug, and upon the warm wine
decant a bottle of soda-water. You will have an effer-
vescing and delicious negus by this means.

1869 Anonymus: Haney’s Steward & Barkeeper’s Manual. Seite 24. Negus Shrub.

Negus is not unfrequently made of any of the light wines,
but usually of port as that is sweeter and more fruity.

1869 Anonymus: Haney’s Steward & Barkeeper’s Manual. Seite 24. Port Wine Negus.

This is very simple, and prepared in, the same way as
brandy flip, without the toast, substituting port for Cognac.
One teaspoonful of sugar; one wine glass of port wine; one
tumbler third full of hot water; grate nutmeg on top.

1869 Anonymus: Haney’s Steward & Barkeeper’s Manual. Seite 24. Soda Negus.

A very pleasant and refreshing drink. Use a pint of
port wine; six or eight lumps of sugar; a few cloves; some
grated nutmeg or ground cinnamon. Warm this in a saucepan,
pour it thence into a jug or pitcher, and turn in a bottle
of soda water.

1869 William Terrington: Cooling Cups and Dainty Drinks. Seite 195. Excellent Negus.

1 bottle of sherry (or port),
2 1/2 pints of water, juice of 1 lemon, a little of the
peel rubbed off on sugar; grated nutmeg, and sugar
to taste; add 1 drop essence of ambergris, or 10
drops essence of vanilla; all to be made and drunk
warm.

1869 William Terrington: Cooling Cups and Dainty Drinks. Seite 202. Negus.

Peel a lemon very thin; add juice of
same and bottle of wine; sugar to taste, and boiling
water according to strength desired.

1869 William Terrington: Cooling Cups and Dainty Drinks. Seite 204. Negus.

Quart of boiling water, pint of port (or
Roussillon) wine, 1/2 lb. loaf-sugar, juice and zest of
a lemon, juice of 2 oranges, little powdered
cinnamon and nutmeg to taste; mix when cool;
strain, and serve warm; sherry or any other wine
can be substituted for the port, but port-wine negus
is usually made.

1869 William Terrington: Cooling Cups and Dainty Drinks. Seite 204. Soda Negus.

Put 1/2 pint port wine into a
saucepan, with 4 lumps of sugar, 3 cloves, and
enough grated nutmeg to cover a shilling; warm;
do not suffer it to boil; pour into a jug; on the
warm wine pour a bottle of soda-water.

1871 E. Ricket & C. Thomas: The Gentleman’s Table Guide. Seite 20. Negus (Port or Sherry).

TO 1 bottle of good fruity port made hot
allow 1 quart of boiling water, quarter of
a pound of loaf sugar or 1 gill capillaire,
1 fresh lemon cut in thin slices, grated nutmeg.
An excellent beverage for evening parties.

1871 Richard Cook: Oxford Night Caps. Seite 5. Negus.

Negus is a modern beverage, and, accord-
ing to Malone, derives its name from its
inventor, Colonel Negus. Dr. Willich, in
his “Lectures on Diet and Regimen,”
says, that Negus is one of the most inno-
cent and wholesome species of drink;
especially if Seville oranges be added to
red port wine, instead of lemons; and
drunk moderately, it possesses considerable
virtues in strengthening the stomach; but,
on account of the volatile and heating oil
in the orange peel, Negus, if taken in
great quantities, is more stimulant and
drying than pure wine.

1871 Richard Cook: Oxford Night Caps. Seite 6. White Wine Negus.

Extract the juice from the peeling of
one lemon, by rubbing loaf sugar on it;
or cut the peeling of a lemon extremely
thin, and pound it in a mortar. Cut two
lemons into thin slices; four glasses of
calves-feet jelley in a liquid state; small
quantities of cinnamon, mace, cloves, and
all-spice. Put the whole into a jug, pour
one quart of boiling water upon it, cover
the jug close, let it stand a quarter of an
hour, and then add one bottle of boiling
hot white wine. Grate half a nutmeg into
it, stir it well together, sweeten it to your
taste, and it is fit for use.
Seville oranges are not generally used at
Oxford in making Negus; when they are,
one orange is allowed to each bottle of wine.

1871 Richard Cook: Oxford Night Caps. Seite 7. Cold White Wine Negus.

To make white wine Negus, let the mixture
stand until it is quite cold, and then pour a
bottle of white wine into it.
It is sometimes in the summer season
placed in a tub of ice: when that is done it
will be necessary to make the Negus somewhat
sweeter, as extreme cqld detracts from
the sweetness of liquors.

1871 Richard Cook: Oxford Night Caps. Seite 7. Port Wine Negus.

In making port wine Negus, merely omit
the jelly: for when port wine comes in contact
with calves-feet jelly, it immediately
assumes a disagreeable muddy appearance.
Negus is not confined to any particular
sorts of wine; if the jelly is omitted, it can
be made with any, or several sorts mixed
together.

1872 E. Ricket & C. Thomas: The Gentleman’s Table Guide. Seite 20. Negus (Port or Sherry).

TO 1 bottle of good fruity port made hot
allow 1 quart of boiling water, quarter of
a pound of loaf sugar or 1 gill capillaire,
1 fresh lemon cut in thin slices, grated nutmeg.
An excellent beverage for evening parties.

1872 William Terrington: Cooling Cups and Dainty Drinks. Seite 195. Excellent Negus.

1 bottle of sherry (or port),
2 1/2 pints of water, juice of 1 lemon, a little of the
peel rubbed off on sugar; grated nutmeg, and sugar
to taste; add 1 drop essence of ambergris, or 10
drops essence of vanilla; all to be made and drunk
warm.

1872 William Terrington: Cooling Cups and Dainty Drinks. Seite 202. Negus.

Peel a lemon very thin; add juice of
same and bottle of wine; sugar to taste, and boiling
water according to strength desired.

1872 William Terrington: Cooling Cups and Dainty Drinks. Seite 204. Negus.

Quart of boiling water, pint of port (or
Roussillon) wine, 1/2 lb. loaf-sugar, juice and zest of
a lemon, juice of 2 oranges, little powdered
cinnamon and nutmeg to taste; mix when cool;
strain, and serve warm; sherry or any other wine
can be substituted for the port, but port-wine negus
is usually made.

1872 William Terrington: Cooling Cups and Dainty Drinks. Seite 204. Soda Negus.

Put 1/2 pint port wine into a
saucepan, with 4 lumps of sugar, 3 cloves, and
enough grated nutmeg to cover a shilling; warm;
do not suffer it to boil; pour into a jug; on the
warm wine pour a bottle of soda-water.

1876 Jerry Tomas: How to Mix Drinks. Seite 62. Port Wine Negus.

To every pint of port wine allow:
1 quart of boiling water.
1/2 lb. of loaf-sugar.
1 lemon.
Grated nutmeg to taste.
Put the wine into a jug, rub some lumps of sugar (equal
to 1/4 lb.) on the lemon rind until all the yellow part of the
skin is absorbed, then squeeze the juice and strain it. Add
the sugar and lemon-juice to the port wine, with the grated
nutmeg; pour over it the boiling water, cover the jug, and
when the beverage has cooled a little, it will be fit for use.
Negus may also be made of sherry, or any other sweet
wine, but it is more usually made of port. This beverage
derives its name from Colonel Negus, who is said to have
invented it.

1876 Jerry Thomas: How to Mix Drinks. Seite 62. Port Wine Negus.

(Use small bar glass.)
1 wine-glass of port wine.
1 teaspoonful of sugar.
Fill tumbler one-third full with hot water.

1876 Jerry Thomas: How to Mix Drinks. Seite 63. Soda Negus.

A most refreshing and elegant beverage, particularly for
those who do not take punch or grog after supper, is
thus made:
Put half a pint of port wine, with four lumps of sugar,
three cloves, and enough grated nutmeg to cover a shil-
ling, into a saucepan; warm it well, but do not suffer it to
boil; pour it into a bowl or jug, and upon the warm wine
decant a bottle of soda-water. You will have an effer-
vescing and delicious negus by this means.

1876 Jerry Tomas: The Bartender’s Guide. Seite 62. Port Wine Negus.

To every pint of port wine allow:
1 quart of boiling water.
1/2 lb. of loaf-sugar.
1 lemon.
Grated nutmeg to taste.
Put the wine into a jug, rub some lumps of sugar (equal
to 1/4 lb.) on the lemon rind until all the yellow part of the
skin is absorbed, then squeeze the juice and strain it. Add
the sugar and lemon-juice to the port wine, with the grated
nutmeg; pour over it the boiling water, cover the jug, and
when the beverage has cooled a little, it will be fit for use.
Negus may also be made of sherry, or any other sweet
wine, but it is more usually made of port. This beverage
derives its name from Colonel Negus, who is said to have
invented it.

1876 Jerry Thomas: The Bartender’s Guide. Seite 62. Port Wine Negus.

(Use small bar glass.)
1 wine-glass of port wine.
1 teaspoonful of sugar.
Fill tumbler one-third full with hot water.

1876 Jerry Thomas: The Bartender’s Guide. Seite 63. Soda Negus.

A most refreshing and elegant beverage, particularly for
those who do not take punch or grog after supper, is
thus made:
Put half a pint of port wine, with four lumps of sugar,
three cloves, and enough grated nutmeg to cover a shil-
ling, into a saucepan; warm it well, but do not suffer it to
boil; pour it into a bowl or jug, and upon the warm wine
decant a bottle of soda-water. You will have an effer-
vescing and delicious negus by this means.

1878 Leo Engel: American & Other Drinks. Seite 52. Port Wine Negus.

To every pint of port allow one quart of boiling water; quarter of a
pound of loaf sugar; one lemon; grated nutmeg to taste. Put the
wine in a jug; rub some lumps of sugar (a quarter of a pound) on
the lemon rind until all the yellow part of the skin is absorbed;
then squeeze the juice and strain it; add the sugar and lemon
juice to the port wine, with the grated nutmeg; pour on the boiling
water, cover the jug, and when the beverage has cooled a little, it
will be ready for use. Negus may also be made of sherry or any
other sweet wine, but it is inore usually made of port. This
beverage derives its name from Colonel Negus, who is said to
have invented it.

1878 Leo Engel: American & Other Drinks. Seite 52. Port Wine Negus (Another.).

Use small tumbler.
One wine glass of port wine; one tea-spoonful ot sugar. Fill
tumbler one-third full with hot water. Grated nutmeg on top.

1878 Leo Engel: American & Other Drinks. Seite 52. Soda Negus.

A most refreshing and elegant beverage, particularly for those
who do not take punch or grog at night:- Put half a pint of
port wine, with four lumps of sugar, three cloves, and enough
grated nutmeg to cover a shilling, into a saucepan; warm it
well, but do not allow it to boil. Pour it into a bowl or jug, and,
upon the wann wine, decant a bottle of soda-water. You will have
a delicious and effervescing negus by this means.

1881 Leo Engel: American & Other Drinks. Seite 52. Port Wine Negus.

To every pint of port allow one quart of boiling water; quarter of a
pound of loaf sugar; one lemon; grated nutmeg to taste. Put the
wine in a jug; rub some lumps of sugar (a quarter of a pound) on
the lemon rind until all the yellow part of the skin is absorbed;
then squeeze the juice and strain it; add the sugar and lemon
juice to the port wine, with the grated nutmeg; pour on the boiling
water, cover the jug, and when the beverage has cooled a little, it
will be ready for use. Negus may also be made of sherry or any
other sweet wine, but it is inore usually made of port. This
beverage derives its name from Colonel Negus, who is said to
have invented it.

1881 Leo Engel: American & Other Drinks. Seite 52. Port Wine Negus (Another.).

Use small tumbler.
One wine glass of port wine; one tea-spoonful ot sugar. Fill
tumbler one-third full with hot water. Grated nutmeg on top.

1881 Leo Engel: American & Other Drinks. Seite 52. Soda Negus.

A most refreshing and elegant beverage, particularly for those
who do not take punch or grog at night:- Put half a pint of
port wine, with four lumps of sugar, three cloves, and enough
grated nutmeg to cover a shilling, into a saucepan; warm it
well, but do not allow it to boil. Pour it into a bowl or jug, and,
upon the wann wine, decant a bottle of soda-water. You will have
a delicious and effervescing negus by this means.

1883 Patsy McDonought: Mc Donought’s Bar-Keeper’s Guide. Seite 40. Port Wine and Negus.

Use large bar glass, four lumps of loaf sugar, one wine-glass and a
half of Port Wine, fill up with boiling water; grate Nutmeg on top.

1883 Patsy McDonought: Mc Donought’s Bar-Keeper’s Guide. Seite 40. Soda Negus.

Use a quart of Port Wine, a quarter pound of loaf sugar, spice
with Cloves, Cinnamon and Nutmeg, warm this in a sauce pan and
in a large pitcher; add a quart of Plain Soda.

1884 Joseph W. Gibson: Scientific Bar-Keeping. Seite 33. Port Wine Negus.

1 wine glass of port wine; 1
teaspoonful of sugar. Fill tumbler 1/3 full with hot water.
(Use small bar glass.)

1884 Joseph W. Gibson: Scientific Bar-Keeping. Seite 33. Port Wine Negus.

To every pint of port wine allow:
1 quart of boiling water; 1/4 lb. of loaf-sugar; 1 lemon.
Grated nutmeg to taste.
Put the wine into a jug, rub some lumps of sugar (equal to 1/4
lb.) on the lemon rind until all the yellow part of the skin is
absorbed, then squeeze the juice and strain it. Add the sugar
and lemon juice to the port wine, with the grated nutmeg; pour
over it the boiling water, cover the jug, and when the beverage
has cooled a little, it will be fit for use. Negus may also be
made of sherry, or any other sweet wine, but it is more usually
made of port. This beverage derives its name from Colonel
Negus, who is said to have invented it.

1884 Joseph W. Gibson: Scientific Bar-Keeping. Seite 34. Soda Negus.

Put half a pint of port wine, with 4 lumps
of sugar, 3 cloves and enough grated nutmeg to cover a shil-
ling into a saucepan; warm it well, but do not suffer it to boil;
pour it into a bowl or jug, and upon the warm wine decant a
bottle of soda-water.

1884 O. Byron: The Modern Bartender’s Guide. Seite 42. Port Wine Negus.

(A small bar glass.)
1 tea-spoon sugar.
1 wine glass Port wine.
Fill glass 1/2 full of hot water.
Grate a little nutmeg on top. Serve.

1885 Emile ebour-Fawssett: New Guide for the Hotel, Bar, Restaurant, Butler, and Chef. Seite 184. Invalid Negus.

Port Wine, 1 Glass.
Boiling Water, 1 ,,
Sugar, 2 Lumps.
Egg, 1.
Beat up the egg in a tea cup. Put the sugar into the
tumbler, add a wine glass of boiling water, dissolve the sugar
then commence to beat the egg, add the boiling water by
degrees. Put the whole into the tumbler, add the port wine
and serve.

1885 Emile ebour-Fawssett: New Guide for the Hotel, Bar, Restaurant, Butler, and Chef. Seite 184. Sherry Negus.

CAN be made in the same way, — substituting sherry for the
port.

1887 Charlie Paul: American and Other Iced Drinks. Seite 39. Hot Port Negus.

Take a tumbler; put in a teaspoonful of sugar
and a glass of port wine ; fill up with boiling water
and grate a little nutmeg on top.

1887 Charlie Paul: American and Other Iced Drinks. Seite 67. Soda Negus.

(About a quart.)
Take a thoroughly clean saucepan; and put in a
pint of port wine, eight lumps of sugar, six cloves,
and about a teaspoonful of grated nutmeg; stir
well over a fire, but be careful not to let it boil;
then empty it into a bowl, and add a bottle of
soda-water. This is a fine effervescing drink.

1887 Jerry Thomas: Bar-Tender’s Guide. Seite 61. Port Wine Negus.

(Use small bar-glass.)
Take 1 wine-glass of Port wine.
1 tea-spoonful of sugar.
Fill tumbler one-third full with hot water, and grate
a little nutmeg on top before serving.

1887 Jerry Thomas: Bar-Tender’s Guide. Seite 61. Port Wine Negus.

(General rule for preparing a quantity.)
To every pint of Port wine allow:
1 quart of boiling water.
1/4 of a pound of loaf-sugar.
1 lemon.
Grated nutmeg to taste.
Put the wine into a jug, rub some lumps of sugar
(equal to one-quarter of a pound) on the lemon rind
until all the yellow part of the skin is absorbed, then
squeeze the juice and strain it. Add the sugar and
lemon-juice to the Port wine, with the grated nutmeg;
pour over it the boiling water, cover the jug, and when
the beverage has cooled a little, it will be fit for use.
Negus may also be made of Sherry, or any other
sweet wine, but it is more usually made of Port.
This is an English beverage and derives its name
from Colonel Negus, who is said to have invented it.

1887 Jerry Thomas: Bar-Tender’s Guide. Seite 62. Soda Negus.

(About one quart.)
Take 1 pint of Port wine.
8 lumps of white loaf sugar.
6 cloves.
Grated nutmeg sufficient to fill a small teaspoon.
Put the above ingredients into a thoroughly clean
sauce pan, warm and stir them well, but do not suffer
the mixture to boil. Pour it into a pitcher or bowl,
and upon the warm wine decant a bottle of plain
soda-water.
This makes a delicious effervescing drink.

1888 Harry Johnson: New and Improved Illustrated Bartender’s Manual. Seite 100. Soda Negus.

(Use a small punch bowl; about 1 quart.)
1 pint of Port wine;
12 lumps of white loaf sugar;
8 cloves;
grated nutmeg sufficient to fill a small tea-spoon;
put the above ingredients into a thoroughly clean
sauce pan, warm and stir them well, but do uot
suffer it to boil; upon the warm wine empty a
bottle of plain soda water. This makes a delicious
and refreshing drink.

1888 Harry Lamore: The Bartender. Seite 29. Negus.

Use small bar glass.
Take one wine-glass of Port wine.
One teaspoouful of sugar.
Fill tumbler one third full with hot water, and grate a
little nutmeg on top before serving.

1888 Harry Lamore: The Bartender. Seite 30. Port Wine Negus.

General rule for preparing a quantity.
To every pint of Port wine allow:
One quart of boiling water.
One quarter of a pound of loaf-sugar.
One lemon.
Grated nutmeg to taste.
Put the wine into a jug, rub some lumps of sugar (equal
to one-quarter of a pound) on the lemon rind until all the
yellow part of the skin is absorbed, then squeeze the juice
and strain it. Add the sugar and lemon juice to the Port
wine with the grated nutmeg; pour over it the boiling
water, cover the jug, and when the beverage has cooled a
little, it will be fit for use.
Negus may also be made of sherry, or any other sweet
wine, but it is more usually made of Port.
This is an English beverage and derives its name from
Colonel Negus, who is said to have invented it.

1888 Harry Lamore: The Bartender. Seite 30. Soda Negus.

About one quart.
Take one pint of Port wine.
Eight lumps ot white loaf sugar.
Six cloves.
Grated nutmeg sufficient to fill a small teaspoon.
Put the above ingredients into a thoroughly clean sauce
pan, warm and stir them well, but do not suffer the mixture
to boil. Pour into a pitcher or bowl, and upon the warm
wine decant a bottle of plain soda water.
This makes a delicious effervescing drink.

1889 Anonymus (Jerry Thomas): Bar-Tender’s Guide. Seite 49. Port Wine Negus.

(Use small bar-glass.)
Take 1 wine-glass of Port wine.
1 tea-spoonful of sugar.
Fill tumbler one-third full with hot water, and grate
a little nutmeg on top before serving.

1889 Anonymus (Jerry Thomas): Bar-Tender’s Guide. Seite 49. Port Wine Negus.

(General rule for preparing a quantity.)
To every pint of Port wine allow:
1 quart of boiling water.
1/4 of a pound of loaf-sugar.
1 lemon.
Grated nutmeg to taste.
Put the wine into a jug, rub some lumps of sugar
(equal to one-quarter of a pound) on the lemon rind
until all the yellow part of the skin is absorbed, then
squeeze the juice and strain it. Add the sugar and
lemon-juice to the Port wine, with the grated nutmeg;
pour over it the boiling water, cover the jug, and when
the beverage has cooled a little, it will be fit for use.
Negus may also be made of Sherry, or any other
sweet wine, but it is more usually made of Port.
This is an English beverage and derives its name
from Colonel Negus, who is said to have invented it.

1889 Anonymus (Jerry Thomas): Bar-Tender’s Guide. Seite 50. Soda Negus.

(About one quart.)
Take 1 pint of Port wine.
8 lumps of white loaf sugar.
6 cloves.
Grated nutmeg sufficient to fill a small teaspoon.
Put the above ingredients into a thoroughly clean
sauce pan, warm and stir them well, but do not suffer
the mixture to boil. Pour it into a pitcher or bowl,
and upon the warm wine decant a bottle of plain
soda-water.
This makes a delicious effervescing drink.

1891 Anonymus: Wehman’s Bartenders’ Guide. Seite 38. Soda Negus.

(Use a small punch bowl; about one quart.)
1 pint of Port Wine.
12 lumps of white loaf sugar.
8 cloves.
Grated Nutmeg, sufficient to fill a small tea-spoon.
Put the above ingredients into a thoroughly clean sauce pan,
warm and stir them well, but do not suffer it to boil; upon the
warm wine empty a bottle of plain soda water. This makes a
delicious and refreshing drink.

1891 Anonymus: Wehman’s Bartenders’ Guide. Seite 49. Port Wine Negus.

(Use a small bar glass.)
1 tea-spoon Sugar.
1 wine glass Port Wine.
Fill glass 1/3 full of hot water.
Grate a little nutmeg on top, and serve.

1891 Harriet Anne De Salis: Drinks à la mode. Seite 9. Soda Water Negus.

Heat some port wine with sugar, cloves, and
grated nutmeg, but it must not boil; pour it into
a large tumbler and fill up with soda water.

1891 Harriet Anne De Salis: Drinks à la mode. Seite 29. Negus.

Sweeten either port or sherry according to taste,
and put double the quantity of water to it; flavour
with the thin rind of a lemon, and just give one
grate of nutmeg.

1892 James Mew & John Ashton: Drinks of the World. Seite 185. Negus.

Negus may be made of any sweet wine, but is commonly
composed of port. “It is,” says Jerry Thomas,
“a most refreshing and elegant beverage, particularly
for those who do not take punch or grog after supper.”

1892 William Schmidt: The Flowing Bowl. Seite 228. Negus.

This beverage is of English origin, and there very highly esti-
mated; it derives its name from its inventor, the English Colonel
Negus.
Put the rind of half a lemon or orange in a tureen, add eight
ounces of sugar, one pint of port wine, the fourth part of a small
nutmeg — grated; infuse this for an hour; strain; add one quart
of boiling water, and the drink is ready for use.

1895 George J. Kappeler: Modern American Drinks. Seite 78. Port Wine Negus.

This is simply a hot port. Take one lump of
sugar in a hot-drink glass, add one jigger port
wine, fill with hot water; mix, grate nutmeg on
top.

1895 George J. Kappeler: Modern American Drinks. Seite 78. Sherry Wine Negus.

Prepare same as Port Wine Negus, using sherry
in place of port wine.

1895 R. C. Miller: The American Bar-Tender. Seite 53. Port Wine Negus.

To every pint of port wine allow:
1 quart of boiling water,
1/2 lb. of loaf sugar.
1 lemon.
Grated nutmeg to taste.
Put the wine into a jug, rub some lumps of sugar
(equal to 1/4 lb) on the lemon rind until all the yellow
part of the skin is absorbed, then squeeze the juice and
strain it. Add the sugar and lemon-juice to the port
wine, with the grated nutmeg; pour over it the boiling
water, cover the jug, and when the beverage has cooled
a little, it will be fit for use. Negus may also be made
of sherry, or any other sweet wine, but it is more usual
ly made of port. This beverage derives its name from
Colonel Negus, who is said to have invented it.

1895 R. C. Miller: The American Bar-Tender. Seite 53. Port Wine Negus.

(Use small bar glass.)
1 wine-glass of port wine.
1 teaspoonful of sugar.
Fill tumbler one-third full with hot water.

1895 R. C. Miller: The American Bar-Tender. Seite 54. Soda Negus.

A most refreshing and elegant beverage, particularly
for those who do not take punch or grog after supper,
is thus made:
Put half a pint of port wine, with four lumps of sugar,
three cloves, and enough grated nutmeg to cover a
shilling, into a saucepan; warm it well, but do not
suffer it to boil; pour it into a bowl or jug, and upon
the warm wine decant a bottle of soda-water. You will
have an effervescing and delicious negus by this means.

1896 Frederick Davies & Seymour Davies: Drinks of All Kinds. Seite 88. Negus.

Negus may be made of sherry or any other sweet wine
(see page 122), but port wine is more usual. Colonel Negus
is said to have invented this beverage.

1896 Frederick Davies & Seymour Davies: Drinks of All Kinds. Seite 88. Port Wine Negus.

Put a pint of port wine into a jug, and rub
some lumps of sugar (equal to a quarter of a
pound) on the rind of a lemon then squeeze
the juice of the lemon and strain it, adding the
sugar and lemon juice to the port wine, with a
little grated nutmeg. Add to this a quart of
boiling water, cover the jug, and when cooled a
little the beverage will be fit for use.

1896 Frederick Davies & Seymour Davies: Drinks of All Kinds. Seite 122. Sherry or White Wine Negus.

Proceed as directed for Port Wine Negus
(see page 88), but add an additional quarter
of a pound of powdered sugar; when dissolved,
add a bottle of sherry, madeira, or champagne,
and a wineglass of noyau or maraschino.

1896 Louis Fouquet: Bariana. Seite 115. Criterion Port Negus.

VERRE ROUGE E
Une cuillerée de sirop de gomme, finir avec du porto
rouge Sandeman, faire chauffer, verser, une tranche de citron
avec 3 clous de girofle et servir.

1896 Louis Fouquet: Bariana. Seite 117. Sandeman’s Port Negus.

VERRE ROUGE E
Faire chauffer une cuillerêe de sirop de gomme, demi-
verre à liqueur de cognac, finir avec du porto rouge San-
deman, verser, une tranche d’orange, 3 clous de girofle et
servir.

1896 William Schmidt: Fancy Drinks and Popular Beverages. Seite 121. Negus.

This beverage is of English origin, and there very highly esti-
mated; it derives its name from its inventor, the English Colonel
Negus.
Put the rind of half a lemon or orange in a tureen, add eight
ounces of sugar, one pint of port wine, the fourth part of a small
nutmeg-grated; infuse this for an hour; strain; add one quart
of boiling water, and the drink is ready for use.

1898 Joseph L. Haywood: Mixology. Seite 44. Colonel Negus.

One-half of a lemon rind, one-half
pound of sugar, macerate well with a little water; add one pint
port wine, let stand for one hour, add a little grated nutmeg;
serve with the addition of one quart of hot water.

1899 Aczél Miksa: American Bar. Seite 92. Port Négus.

(Pohár VI.)
Végy 2-3 drb koczkaczukrot, pár szem szeg-
füszeget, önts hozzá 1/2 pohárka Matignon-féle cognacot,
töltsd fel vörös portó borral, forrald jól, öntsd át a
VI. sz. pohárba, szolgáld fel.

1899 Anonymus: Hegenbarth’s Getränkebuch. Seite 48. Englischer Portwein-Punsch (Portwine-Negus).

Ueber 1 Flasche Portwein, wozu man Zucker,
eine in Scheiben geschnittene Citrone und eine halbe
geriebene Muskatnuss fügte, giesse man 1—1 1/2 l Wasser.

1899 Anonymus: Hegenbarth’s Getränkebuch. Seite 59. Negus.

Der Name soll von „seinem Erfinder“ dem eng-
lischen Oberst Negus abstammen. „Negus“ ist dasselbe
wie unser Glühwein. Nur, dass zu Negus immer etwas
geriebene Muskatnuss verwendet wird, was beim Glüh-
wein weniger der Fall.

1899 Anonymus: Hegenbarth’s Getränkebuch. Seite 60. Heisser Portwein-Negus m. kaltem Sodawasser.

englisch.
Lasse 1 Glas Portwein mit Zucker und einer
Nelke bis an’s Kochen kommen, reibe etwas Muskat-
nuss hinein, giesse dann den Wein in ein grosses Li-
monadenglas und fülle dasselbe mit gewöhnlichem
Soda oder Selters voll.

1899 Edward Spencer: The Flowing Bowl. Seite 168. Port Wine Negus.

Put a pint of port wine into a jug, and rub a
quarter of a pound of sugar, in lumps, on the rind
of a lemon; then squeeze the juice of the lemon
and strain it, adding the sugar and lemon juice to
the port wine, with a little grated nutmeg. Add to
this a quart of boiling water, cover the jug, and
when cool the beverage will be fit for use.

1899 Edward Spencer: The Flowing Bowl. Seite 168. Sherry Negus.

is made with an extra quarter of a pound of
sugar; and a wine-glassful of noyeau or mara­-
schino may be added.

1900 Frank Newman: American Bar. Seite 105. Port Wine Négus.

Verre no 3.
Faire chauffer:
1 cuillerée à café de sucre en poudre,
1 cuillerée à café d’eau chaude pour fondre le
sucre,
1 verre à liqueur de porto rouge.
Remplir le verre d’eau bouillante, remuer, saupoudrer
de muscade, servir.

1900 Frank Newman: American Bar. Seite 105. Sherry Wine Negus.

Verre no 3.
Faire chauffer:
1 cuillerée à café de sucre en poudre,
1 cuillerée à café d’eau chaude pour fondre le
sucre,
1 verre à liqueur de sherry sécco (jerez).
Remplir le verre d’eau bouillante, remuer, saupoudrer
de muscade, servir.

1900 Harry Johnson: The New and Improved Bartender’s Manual. Seite 233. Soda Negus.

(Use a small punch bowl; about one quart.)
1 pint of port wine;
12 lumps of white loaf sugar;
8 cloves;
Grated nutmeg, sufficient to fill a small tea spoon;
Put the above ingredients into a thoroughly clean
sauce pan, warm and stir them well, but do not suffer
it to boil; upon the warm wine empty a bottle of plain
soda water. This makes a delicious and refreshing
drink.

1900 William T. Boothby: Cocktail Boothby’s American Bartender. #99. Port Wine Negus, Hot.

Dissolve a teaspoonful of bar sugar in a hot-water glass three-quarters full of
boiling water. Fill the glass with port wine, stir, and serve without decorations,
flavors or spices of any description.

1900 William T. Boothby: Cocktail Boothby’s American Bartender. #188. Port Wine Negus.

Dissolve a teaspoonful of sugar in a little water in a small bar glass; add a
piece of ice and a jigger of port wine and serve without decoration or spice.

1901 J. E. Sheridan: The complete Buffet Manual. Seite 43. Port Wine Negus.

(Use a small bar glass.)
1/2 tablespoon powdered sugar.
1 wine glass Port wine.
Fill glass one-third full of hot water.
Grate a little nutmeg on top. Serve.

1901 J. E. Sheridan: The complete Buffet Manual. Seite 93. Soda Negus.

(Use a small punch howl; about 1 quart)
1 pint of Port wine.
12 lumps of loaf sugar.
8 cloves.
Grated nutmeg sufficient to fill a small teaspoon;
put the above ingredients into a thoroughly clean
saucepan, warm and stir them well, but do not suffer
it to boil; upon the warm wine empty a bottle of
plain soda. This makes a delicious and refreshing
drink.

1902 Anonymus: Fox’s Bartender’s Guide. Seite 55 Port Wine Negus.

General rule for preparing a quantity.
To every pint of Port wine allow:
One quart boiling water.
One-quarter pound loaf sugar.
One lemon.
Grated nutmeg to taste.
Put the wine into a jug, rub some lumps of sugar
(equal to one-quarter of a pound) on the lemon rind
until all the yellow part of the skin is absorbed, then
squeeze the juice and strain it. Add the sugar and
lemon juice to the Port wine with the grated nutmeg;
pour over it the boiling water, cover the jug, and
when the beverage has cooled a little, it will be fit
for use.
Negus may also be made of sherry or any other
sweet wine, but it is more usually made of Port.

1902 Anonymus: Fox’s Bartender’s Guide. Seite 56 Soda Negus.

About one quart.
One pint of Port wine.
Twelve lumps of white loaf sugar.
Eight cloves.
Grated nutmeg sufficient to fill a small teaspoon.
Put the above ingredients into a thoroughly clean
sauce pan, warm and stir them well, but do not suffer
the mixture to boil. Pour it into a pitcher or bowl,
and upon the warm wine decant a bottle o f soda water.
This makes a delicious effervescing drink.

1902 Charlie Paul: American and Other Iced Drinks. Seite 29. Hot Port Negus.

Take a tumbler; put in a teaspoonful of sugar
and a glass of port wine; fill up with boiling water
and grate a little nutmeg on top.

1902 Charlie Paul: American and Other Iced Drinks. Seite 55. Soda Negus.

(About a quart.)
Take a thoroughly clean saucepan, and put in a
pint of port wine, eight lumps of sugar, six cloves,
and about a teaspoonful ot grated nutmeg; stir
well over a fire, but be careful not to let it boil;
then empty it into a bowl, and add a bottle of
soda-water. This is a fine effervescing drink.

1903 Anonymus: Hegenbarth’s Bowlen- Punch, und Kaffee-Haus-Getränkebuch. Seite 60. Englischer Portwein-Punsch (Portwein-Negus.)

Ueber 1 Flasche Portwein, wozu man Zucker,
eine in Scheiben geschnittene Zitrone und 1/2 ge-
riebene Muskatnuss fügte, giesse man 1-1 1/2 l
kochendes Wasser.

1903 Anonymus: Hegenbarth’s Bowlen- Punch, und Kaffee-Haus-Getränkebuch. Seite 72. Negus.

Der Name soll von „seinem Erfinder“, dem eng-
lischen Oberst Negus abstammen. „Negus“ ist das-
selbe wie unser Glühwein. Nur dass zu Negus immer
etwas geriebene Muskatnuss verwendet wird, was
beim Glühwein seltener der Fall ist.

1903 Anonymus: Hegenbarth’s Bowlen- Punch, und Kaffee-Haus-Getränkebuch. Seite 72. Heisser Portwein-Negus mit kaltem Sodawasser (englisch).

Lasse 1 Glas Portwein mit Zucker und einer
Nelke bis an’s Kochen kommen, reibe etwas Muskat-
nuss hinein, giesse dann den Wein in ein grosses
Limonadenglas und fülle dasselbe mit gewöhnlichem
Soda oder Selters voll.

1903 Edward Spencer: The Flowing Bowl. Seite 168. Port Wine Negus.

Put a pint of port wine into a jug, and rub a
quarter of a pound of sugar, in lumps, on the rind
of a lemon; then squeeze the juice of the lemon
and strain it, adding the sugar and lemon juice to
the port wine, with a little grated nutmeg. Add to
this a quart of boiling water, cover the jug, and
when cool the beverage will be fit for use.

1903 Edward Spencer: The Flowing Bowl. Seite 168. Sherry Negus.

is made with an extra quarter of a pound of
sugar; and a wine-glassful of noyeau or mara-
schino may be added.

1903 Tim Daly: Daly’s Bartender’s Encyclopedia. Seite 22. Soda Negus.

(About one quart.)
1 pint port wine.
12 lumps loaf sugar.
Bar spoonful of grated nutmeg.
Place ingredients in a saucepan; warm
and stir well, but do not allow to boil.
Pour into bowl, and add bottle of soda.
The above makes a most delightful, mild,
hot drink for a home party, and can be in-
dulged in by moderate drinkers without any
unpleasant consequences.

1903 V. B. Lewis: The Complete Buffet Guide. Seite 43. Port Wine Negus.

(Use a small bar glass.)
1/2 tablespoon powdered sugar.
1 wine-glass Portwine.
Fill glass one-third full of hot water.
Grate a little nutmeg on top. Serve.

1903 V. B. Lewis: The Complete Buffet Guide. Seite 91. Soda Negus.

Use a small punch bowl; about 1 quart.
1 pint of Port wine.
12 lumps of loaf sugar.
8 cloves.
Grated nutmeg sufficient to fill a small teaspoon;
put the above ingredients into a thoroughly clean
saucepan, warm and stir them well, but do not suffer
it to boil; upon the warm wine empty a bottle of
plain soda. This makes a delicious and refreshing
drink.

1904 Frank Newman: American-Bar. Seite 76. Port-wine Négus.

Verre n° 3
Faire chauffer:
1 cuillerée à café de sucre en poudre,
un peu d’eau chaude pour fondre le sucre,
1 verre de Porto rouge Sandeman.
Remplir le verre d’eau bouillante, remuer, saupoudrer
de muscade, servir.

1904 Frank Newman: American-Bar. Seite 94. Sherry-wine Négus.

Verre n° 3
Faire chauffer:
1 cuillerée à café de sucre en poudre,
un peu d’eau chaude pour fondre le sucre,
1 verre à madère de sherry secco.
Remplir le verre d’eau bouillante, remuer, saupoudrer
de muscade, servir.

1904 Paul E. Lowe: Drinks as They Are Mixed. Seite 47. Port Wine Negus.

Use small bar glass.
Sugar, 1/2 tablespoonful.
Port wine, 1 wineglass.
Hot water; fill glass 1-3 full.
Sprinkle with nutmeg and serve.

1904 Thomas Stuart: Stuart’s Fancy Drinks. Seite 42. Port Wine Negus.

(A small bar glass)
1 tea-spoon sugar.
1 wine glass Port wine.
Fill glass full of hot water.
Grate a little nutmeg on top. Serve.

1904 Thomas Stuart: Stuart’s Fancy Drinks. Seite 93. Soda Negus.

(Use a small punch bowl; about 1 quart.)
1 pint of Port wine.
13 lumps of loaf sugar.
8 cloves.
Grated nutmeg sufficient to fill a small tea-spoon; put the
above ingredients into a thoroughly clean saucepan, warm
and stir them well, but do not suffer it to boil; upon the
warm wine empty a bottle of plain soda. This makes a
delicious and refreshing drink.

1905 Charles S. Mahoney: The Hoffman House Bartender’s Guide. Seite 189. Soda Negus.

About one quart.
One pint of Port wine.
Twelve lumps of white loaf sugar.
Eight cloves.
Grated nutmeg sufficient to fill a small teaspoon.
Put the above ingredients into a thoroughly clean
sauce pan, warm and stir them well, but do not suffer
the mixture to boil. Pour it into a pitcher or bowl,
and upon the warm wine decant a bottle of soda
water.
This makes a delicious effervescing drink.

1905 Charles S. Mahoney: The Hoffman House Bartender’s Guide. Seite 189. Port Wine Negus.

General rule for preparing a quantity.
To every pint of Port wine allow:
One quart boiling water.
One-quarter pound loaf sugar.
One lemon.
Grated nutmeg to taste.
Put the wine into a jug, rub some lumps of
sugar (equal to one-quarter of a pound) on the
lemon rind until all the yellow part of the skin is
absorbed, then squeeze the juice and strain it. Add
the sugar and lemon juice to the Port wine with
the grated nutmeg; pour over it the boiling water,
cover the jug, and when the beverage has cooled a
little, it will be fit for use.
Negus may also be made of sherry or any other
sweet wine, but it is more usually made of Port.

1906 Anonymus: Dr. Siegert’s Angostura Bitters. Seite 48. Soda Negus.

Use small punch bowl.
1 pint of port wine.
1/2 tablespoon of Dr. Siegert’s Genuine An­-
gostura Bitters.
12 lumps loaf sugar.
12 cloves.
1 teaspoon nutmeg.
Put above ingredients into a clean sauce
pan, warm and stir well, do not let it boil,
pour in on this mixture 1 bottle plain soda.
Put in punch bowl, and serve in cups.

1906 George J. Kappeler: Modern American Drinks. Seite 78. Port Wine Negus.

This is simply a hot port. Take one lump of
sugar in a hot-drink glass, add one jigger port
wine, fill with hot water; mix, grate nutmeg on
top.

1906 George J. Kappeler: Modern American Drinks. Seite 78. Sherry Wine Negus.

Prepare same as Port Wine Negus, using sherry
in place of port wine.

1907 Charles Smith: Smacks and Smiles. Seite 86. Port Wine Negus.

A small bar glass.
1 tea-spoon sugar.
1 wine glass Port wine.
Fill glass one-third full of hot
water.
Grate a little nutmeg, on top.
Serve.

1907 Charles Smith: Smacks and Smiles. Seite 109. Soda Negus.

Use a small punch bowl.
1 pint of Port wine.
12 lumps of loaf sugar.
8 cloves.
Grated nutmeg sufficient to fill
small tea-spoon; put the above in-
gredients into a thoroughly clean
saucepan, warm and stir them well,
but do not allow it to boil; upon the
warm wine empty a bottle of plain
soda. This makes a delicious and
refreshing drink.

1907 Frank Newman: American-Bar. Seite 76. Port wine negus.

Verre n° 3
Faire chauffer:
1 cuillerée à café de sucre en poudre,
un peu d’eau chaude pour fondre le sucre,
1 verre de porto rouge
Remplir le verre d’eau bouillante, remuer, saupoudrer
do muscade, servir.

1907 Frank Newman: American-Bar. Seite 94. Sherry wine negus.

Verre n° 1
Faire chauffer:
1 cuillerée à café de sucre en poudre,
un peu d’eau chaude pour fondre le sucre,
1 verre à madère de sherry sec,
Remplir le verre d’eau bouillante, remuer, saupoudrer
de muscade, servir.

1908 Charles S. Mahoney: The Hoffman House Bartender’s Guide. Seite 189. Soda Negus.

About one quart.
One pint of Port wine.
Twelve lumps of white loaf sugar.
Eight cloves.
Grated nutmeg sufiicient to fill a small teaspoon.
Put the above ingredients into a thoroughly clean
sauce pan, warm and stir them well, but do not suffer
the mixture to boil. Pour it into a pitcher or bowl,
and upon the warm wine decant a bottle of soda
water.
This makes a delicious effervescing drink.

1908 Charles S. Mahoney: The Hoffman House Bartender’s Guide. Seite 189. Port Wine Negus.

General rule for preparing a quantity.
To every pint of Port wine allow:
One quart boiling water.
One-quarter pound loaf sugar.
One lemon.
Grated nutmeg to taste.
Put the wine into a jug, rub some lumps of
sugar (equal to one-quarter of a pound) on the
lemon rind until all the yellow part of the skin is
absorbed, then squeeze the juice and strain it. Add
the sugar and lemon juice to the Port wine with
the grated nutmeg; pour over it the boiling water,
cover the jug, and when the beverage has cooled a
little. It will be fit for use.
Negus may also be made of sherry or any other
sweet wine, but it is more usually made of Port.

1908 Jacob Abraham Grohusko: Jack’s Manual. Seite 55. Soda Negus.

(Use small punch bowl.)
1 pint of Port wine
1/2 tablespoon Angostura bitters
12 lumps loaf sugar
12 cloves
1 teaspoon nutmeg.
Put above ingredients into a
clean saucepan, warm and stir
well, do not let it boil, pour in
on this mixture 1 bottle plain
soda. Put in punch bowl and
serve in cups.

1908 William Boothby: The World’s Drinks. Seite 43. Port Wine Negus, Hot.

Dissolve a teaspoonful of bar sugar in a hot-water glass three-quarters
full of boiling water. Fill the glass with port wine, stir, and serve without
decorations, flavors or spices of any description.

1908 William Boothby: The World’s Drinks. Seite 67. Port Wine Negus.

Dissolve a teaspoonful of bar sugar in a little water in a small glass;
add a piece of ice and a jigger of port wine and serve without decorations
or spice.

1909 Carl A. Seutter: Der Mixologist. Seite 49. Soda-Negus.

In eine Kasserolle gebe man 1 Glas Portwein, 3 Stück Würfel-
zucker, einige Nelken und eine Messerspitze Muskatnuß, bringe
es auf Feuer und vermische es mit einem Löffel. Wenn beinahe kochend,
nehme man es vom Feuer, seihe es in ein großes Barglas und gieße
eine Flasche Sodawasser hinzu, mische vorsichtig, damit das Getränk
nicht überschäumt.

1909 Carl A. Seutter: Der Mixologist. Seite 49. Portwein-Negus.

In ein angewärmtes Punschglas gebe man 2 Stück Würfelzucker,
fülle es 3/4 voll mit heißem Wasser, darauf gieße man es voll mit
Portwein und serviere ohne weitere Zutaten.

1909 Charlie Paul: American and Other Iced Drinks. Seite 31. Hot Port Negus.

Take a tumbler; put in a teaspoonful of sugar
and a glass of port wine; fill up with boiling water
and grate a little nutmeg on top.

1909 Charlie Paul: American and Other Iced Drinks. Seite 57. Soda Negus.

(About a quart.)
Take a thoroughly clean saucepan, and put in a
pint of port wine, eight lumps of sugar, six cloves,
and about a teaspoonful of grated nutmeg; stir
well over a fire, but be careful not to let it boil;
then empty it into a bowl, and add a bottle of
soda-water. This is a fine effervescing drink.

1909 George J. Kappeler: Modern American Drinks. Seite 78. Port Wine Negus.

This is simply a hot port. Take one lump of
sugar in a hot-drink glass, add one jigger port
wine, fill with hot water; mix, grate nutmeg on
top.

1909 George J. Kappeler: Modern American Drinks. Seite 78. Sherry Wine Negus.

Prepare same as Port Wine Negus, using sherry
in place of port wine.

1910 E. Moreno: Manual del cantinero o cocktelero perfecto. Seite 86. Negus corriente.

Vayase echando en un recipiente cuanto sigue:
Oporto . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1/2 botelilia
Azúcar blanca . . . . . . . . 2 terrones
Ocho clavos
Añádase nuez moscada, según el gusto; luego pón-
gase á calentar el recipiente teniendo la precaución
de que no hierva; cuando el vino esté caliente, añá-
dase una botella de agua de soda y ofrézcase la be-
bida Con estas cantidades se. prepara una botella
de Negus Córiente.

1910 E. Moreno: Manual del cantinero o cocktelero perfecto. Seite 87. Negus Portugal.

Para una persona sola tómese un vaso pequeño y
añádasele cuanto sigue:
Oporto . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 copa
Azúcar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 cucharadita
Procúrese llenar el vaso basta la tercera parte con
agua bien caliente, rocíese con un poco de nuez mos-
cada y ofrézcase la bebida.
Si se desean cantidades mayores, básese siempre
en la siguiente proporción:
Oporto . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 botella
Azúcar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1/4 de libra
Agua hirviendo . . . . . . . 1 botella
Un limón — Nuez moscada, según el gusto
Para una botella de Oporto, duplìquense los de-
más ingredientes y así sucesivamente.
Esta bebida en cantidades mayores se prepara del
modo siguiente: Se echa el Oporto en un recipiente
adecuado, se le añade el azúcar (en el que se habrá
frotado la corteza del limón hasta que haya embe-
bido lo amarillo), se extrae todo el jugo del mismo; á
continuación sé echa el agua hirviendo, se tapa bien
el recipiente y se sirve cuando la preparación se ha
enfriado un poco. Si se desea, esta bebida puede
prepararse con Jerez ú otro vino por el estilo; pero
es preferible el Oporto.

1910 Jacob Abraham Grohusko. Jack’s Manual. Seite 73. Soda Negus.

(Use small punch bowl.)
1 pint of Port wine
1/2 tablespoon Angostura bitters
12 lumps loaf sugar
12 cloves
1 teaspoonful nutmeg.
Put above ingredients into a clean saucepan, warm and
stir well; do not let it boil; pour in on this mixture 1 bottle
plain soda.
Put in punch bowl and serve in cups.

1912 Anonymus: Wehman Bros.’ Bartenders’ Guide. Seite 43. Soda Negus.

(Use a small punch bowl; about one quart.)
One pint of port wine.
Twelve lumps of white loaf sugar,
Eight cloves,
Grated nutmeg sufficient to fill a small teaspoon.
Put the above ingredients into a thoroughly clean sauce
pan, warm and stir them well, but do not suffer it to boil
upon the warm wine empty a bottle of plain soda water.

1912 Anonymus: Wehman Bros.’ Bartenders’ Guide. Seite 44. Port Wine Negus.

(Use a small bar glass.)
One teaspoonful of sugar,
One wine-glass of port wine,
Fill the glass one-third full of hot water.
Grate a little nutmeg on top and serve.

1912 Charles S. Mahoney: The Hoffman House Bartender’s Guide. Seite 189. Soda Negus.

About one quart.
One pint of Port wine.
Twelve lumps of white loaf sugar.
Eight cloves.
Grated nutmeg sufficient to fill a small teaspoon
Put the above ingredients into a thoroughly clean
sauce pan, warm and stir them well, but do not suffer
the mixture to boil. Pour it into a pitcher or bowl,
and upon the warm wine decant a bottle of soda
Water.
This makes a delicious effervescing drink.

1912 Charles S. Mahoney: The Hoffman House Bartender’s Guide. Seite 189. Port Wine Negus.

General rule for preparing a quantity.
To every pint of Port wine allow:
One quart boiling water.
One-quarter pound loaf sugar.
One lemon.
Grated nutmeg to taste.
Put the wine into a jug, rub some lumps of
sugar (equal to one-quarter of a pound) on the
lemon rind until all the yellow part of the skin is
absorbed, then squeeze the juice and strain it. Add
the sugar and lemon juice to the Port wine with
the grated nutmeg; pour over it the boiling water,
cover the jug, and when the beverage has cooled a
little. It will be fit for use.
Negus may also be made of sherry or any other
sweet wine, but it is more usually made of Port.

1912 Charlie Paul: American and Other Iced Drinks. Seite 31. Hot Port Negus.

Take a tumbler; put in a teaspoonful of sugar
and a glass of port wine; fill up with boiling water
and grate a little nutmeg on top.

1912 Charlie Paul: American and Other Iced Drinks. Seite 57. Soda Negus.

(About a quart.)
Take a thoroughly clean saucepan, and put in a
pint of port wine, eight lumps of sugar, six cloves,
and about a teaspoonful of grated nutmeg; stir
well over a fire, but be careful not to let it boil;
then empty it into a bowl, and add a bottle of
soda water. This is a fine effervescing drink.

1912 John H. Considine: The Buffet Blue Book. #188. Soda Negus.

Use small punch bowl; 1 pint of port
wine, 12 lumps loaf sugar, 12 cloves, 1
teaspoonful nutmeg. Put above ingredients
into a clean sauce pan, warm and stir well;
do not let it boll; pour Into this mixture 1
bottle plain soda.- Put in punch bowl and
serve in cups.

1912 William Boothby: The World’s Drinks. Seite 43. Port Wine Negus.

Dissolve a teaspoonful of bar sugar in a hot-water glass three-quarters
full of boiling water. Fill the glass with port wine, stir, and serve without
decorations, flavors or spices of any description.

1912 William Boothby: The World’s Drinks. Seite 67. Port Wine Negus.

Dissolve a teaspoonful of bar sugar in a little water in a small glass;
add a piece of ice and a jigger of port wine and serve without decorations
or spice.

1913 Bartender’s Association of America: Bartenders’ Manual. Seite 38. Port Wine Negus.

(A small bar glass.) 1 tea-
spoon of sugar; 1 wineglass of port wine; fill glass
1/3 full of hot water; grate a little nutmeg on top.

1913 Bartender’s Association of America: Bartenders’ Manual. Seite 42. Soda Negus.

(Use a small punch bowl, about 1
quart.) 1 pint of port wine; 13 lumps of loaf sugar;
8 cloves; grated nutmeg sufficient to fill a small
teaspoon; put the above ingredients into a thorough-
ly clean saucepan, warm and stir them well, but do
not suffer it to boil; upon the warm wine empty a
bottle of plain soda. This makes a delicious and re-
freshing drink.

1913 Carl A. Seutter: Der Mixologist. Seite 49. Soda-Negus.

In eine Kasserolle gebe man 1 Glas Portwein, 3 Stück Würfelzucker,
einige Nelken und eine Messerspitze Muskatnuß, bringe es aufs Feuer und
vermische es mit einem Löffel. Wenn beinahe kochend, nehme man es vom
Feuer, seihe es in ein großes Barglas und gieße eine Flasche Sodawasser
hinzu, mische vorsischtig, damit das Getrànk nicht überschäumt.

1913 Carl A. Seutter: Der Mixologist. Seite 49. Portwein-Sangaree, heiss.

Wie Portwein-Negus; serviere mit Muskatnuß darauf gestreut.

1913 Carl A. Seutter: Der Mixologist. Seite 49. Portwein-Negus.

In ein angewärmtes Punschglas gebe man 2 Stück Würfelzucker,
fülle es 3/4 voll mit heißem Wasser, darauf gieße man es voll mit
Portwein und serviere ohne weitere Zutaten.

1913 Hans Schönfeld & John Leybold: Lexikon der Getränke. Seite 103. Hot-Port-Negus.

In ein erwärmtes Punschglas gib: 1 Tee-
löffel ff. Zucker, 1 Glas Portwein, fülle auf mit kochen-
dem Wasser und streue Muskatnuß obenauf.

1913 Hans Schönfeld & John Leybold: Lexikon der Getränke. Seite 103. Hot-Sherry-Negus.

Wie Port-Negus, gebrauche Sherry, statt
Portwein.

1913 Hans Schönfeld & John Leybold: Lexikon der Getränke. Seite 166. Portwein-Negus.

1 Glas Portwein mit einigen Nelken und
1 Teelöffel Zucker aufkochen, in ein hohes Glas seihen
und mit Selters auffüllen.

1913 Harry Montague: The Up-To-Date Bartenders’ Guide. Seite 25. Port Wine Negus.

Pour into a tumbler:
1 jigger port wine.
1 1/2 teaspoonfuls bar sugar.
Fill three-quarters full with hot water; grate nut-
meg on top and serve.

1913 Jacques Straub: A Complete Manual of Mixed Drinks. Seite 80. Port Wine Negus.

1/2 Lump Sugar.
Fill glass 2/3 Hot Water.
1 Jigger Port Wine.
Stir.
Grated Nutmeg on top.

1913 Jacques Straub: A Complete Manual of Mixed Drinks. Seite 100. Soda Negus Punch Bowl.

4 dashes Angostura Bitters.
1 Pint of Port Wine.
10 or 12 Lumps of Loaf Sugar.
12 Whole Cloves.
1 Teaspoon Nutmeg.
Put above ingredients into Saucepan,
warm and stir well. Do not let it boil.
Remove this mixture to cool, then add
1 Pint Soda in Punch and serve in
Cups.

1914 Anonymus (Charles S. mahoney): New Bartender’s Guide. Seite 44. Port Wine Negus.

Use small bar-glass.
One wine-glass of port wine.
One teaspoonful of fine sugar.
Fill glass with hot water; grate a little nut­-
meg on top and serve.

1914 Anonymus (Charles S. Mahoney): New Bartender’s Guide. Seite 54. Soda Negus.

(for a party of ten).
Use a punch-bowl or other suitable vessel.
Twenty-four lumps of loaf sugar.
Fourteen cloves.
Two teaspoonfuls of grated nutmeg.
One quart of port wine.
Put above ingredients into a saucepan; heat
and stir well; do not allow mixture to boil. Pour
in two bottles of soda water. Serve in punch-
glasses.

1914 Anonymus (Charles S. Mahoney): The Up-To-Date Bartender’s Guide. Seite 25. Port Wine Negus.

Pour into a tumbler:
1 jigger port wine.
1 1/2 teaspoonfuls bar-sugar
Fill three-quarters full with hot water; grate nut-
meg on top and serve.

1914 Anonymus: The Art of Mixing Drinks. Seite 50. Port Wine Negus.

(A small bar glass.) 1 teaspoon of sugar; 1
wineglass of port wine; fill glass 1/3 full of hot
water; grate a little nutmeg on top.

1914 Anonymus: The Art of Mixing Drinks. Seite 55. Soda Negus.

(Use a small punch bowl, about 1 quart.) 1
pint of port wine; 12 lumps of loaf sugar; 8
cloves; grated nutmeg sufficient to fill a small
teaspoon; put the above ingredients into a thor-
oughly clean saucepan warm and stir them well,
but do not suffer it to boil; upon the warm wine
empty a bottle of plain soda. This makes a
delicious and refreshing drink.

1914 Ernest P. Rawling: Rawling’s Book of Mixed Drinks. Seite 77. Port Wine Negus.

Rub a cube of sugar on the skin of a
lemon until all sides have been satu-
rated. Drop the sugar into a long-
stemmed glass with a measure of port
wine. Fill the glass with hot water;
stir, and grate nutmeg on top.

1914 Jacques Straub: Drinks. Seite 64. Port Wine Negus.

1/2 lump sugar.
Fill glass 2/3 hot water.
1 jigger port wine. Stir.
Grated nutmeg on
top.

1914 Jacques Straub: Drinks. Seite 77. Soda Negus Punch Bowl.

4 dashes Angostura bitters.
1 pint of port wine.
10 or 12 lumps of loaf sugar.
12 whole cloves.
1 teaspoon nutmeg.
Put above ingredients into saucepan, warm and
stir well. Do not let it boil.
Eemove this mixture to cool, then add 1 pint
soda in punch and serve in cups.

1916 Charlie Paul: Recipes of American and Other Mixed Drinks. Seite 31. Hot Port Negus.

Take a tumbler; put in a teaspoonful of sugar
and a glass of port wine; fill up with boiling water
and grate a little nutmeg on top.

1912 Charlie Paul: American and Other Iced Drinks. Seite 55. Soda Negus.

(About a quart.)
Take a thoroughly clean saucepan, and put in
a pint of port wine, eight lumps of sugar, six
cloves, and about a teaspoonful of grated nut-
meg; stir well over a fire, but be careful not to
let it boil; then empty it into a bowl, and add
a bottle of soda water. This is a fine effer-
vescing drink.

1916 Jacob Abraham Grohusko: Jack’s Manual. Seite 138. Soda Negus Bowl Punch.

(Use small punch bowl)
1 pint of Poot Wine
1/2 tablespoonful Angostura Bitters
12 lumps of loaf sugar
12 cloves
1 teaspoonful nutmeg.
Put above ingredients into a saucepan, warm and stir
well; do not let it boil, pour in on this mixture one bottle
plain soda. Put in punch bowl and serve in cups.

1920 Anonymus: Good Cheer. Seite 43. Port Wine Negus.

1/2 lump sugar.
Fill glass 2/3 hot water.
1 shot port wine.
Stir. Grated nutmeg on top.

1920 Anonymus: Good Cheer. Seite 53. Soda Negus Punch Bowl.

4 dashes of Angostura bitters.
1 pint of port wine.
10 or 12 lumps of loaf sugar.
12 whole doves.
1 teaspoon nutmeg.
Put above ingredients into saucepan, warm
and stir well. Do not let it boil.
Remove this mixture to cool, then add 1 pint
soda in punch and serve in cups.

1920 Carl A. Seutter: Der Mixologist. Seite 49. Soda-Negus.

In eine Kasserolle gebe man 1 Glas Portwein, 3 Stück Würfel­-
zucker, einige Nelken und eine Messerspitze Muskatnuß, bringe
es auf Feuer und vermische es mit einem Löffel. Wenn beinahe kochend,
nehme man es vom Feuer, seihe es in ein großes Barglas und gieße
eine Flasche Sodawasser hinzu, mische vorsichtig, damit das Getränk
nicht überschäumt.

1920 Carl A. Seutter: Der Mixologist. Seite 49. Portwein-Sangaree, heiß.

Wie Portwein-Negus; serviere mit Muskatnuß darauf
gestreut.

1920 Carl A. Seutter: Der Mixologist. Seite 49. Portwein-Negus.

In ein angewärmtes Punschglas gebe man 2 Stück Würfelzucker,
fülle es 3/4 voll mit heißem Wasser, darauf gieße man es voll mit
Portwein und serviere ohne weitere Zutaten.

1920 Ferruccio Mazzon: Guida del barman mixer. Seite 101. Port Negus.

In un bicchiere a grog:
1 cucchiaino di zucchero in polvere
1 bicchiere a marsala di vino di Porto
rosso
1/2 bicchiere a liquori di Curacao rosso.
Spiccate con 3 chiodi di garofano, una
fettina di limone ed aggiungete al resto;
riempite quindi il bicchiere con acqa bol-
lente e servite con una grattuggiata di noce
moscata.

1920 Niels Larsen: 156 recettes de boissons américaines. Seite 91. Port Negus.

[A préparer dans un verre à grog.]
2 morceaux de sucre. Ajoutez:
4 gouttes de curaçao rouge;
1 verre à madère de porto rouge.
Remplissez le verre d’eau et faites chauffer
presque bouillant
Servez avec une tranche de citron piquée de
quatre clous de girofle et un peu de muscade
râpée.

1922 M. E. Steedman: Home-made Beverages and American Drinks. Seite 51. Negus.

Rub 3 oz. of loaf sugar on to the rind of a
lemon, pound it, and add to it a pint of port,
a quarter of a small nutmeg grated, a pint of
boiling water, and if liked one or two drops of
essence of ambergris or rather more of vanilla.
Serve hot.

1922 M. E. Steedman: Home-made Beverages and American Drinks. Seite 82. White Wine Negus.

Rub 8 oz. loaf sugar on the rind of two lemons
fill all the zest is extracted, and put it into a
jug with the strained juice, a pint of liquid calf’s
foot jelly, an inch of bruised cinnamon, a blade
of mace, 6 cloves, a pinch of allspice, and a quart
of boiling water. Let it stand for twenty
minutes, then add a bottle of white wine,
grated nutmeg to taste and, if liked, a little more
sugar, heat in a saucepan and serve at once.

1923 P. Dagouret: Le barman universel. Seite 108. Port-Wine Negus.

Verre n° 7 réchauffe:
1 cuiller à café sucre en poudre.
1 verre à madère porto rouge.
Emplir d’eau bouillante. Zeste de citron.
Remuer. Muscader. Servir.

1923 P. Dagouret: Le barman universel. Seite 110. Sherry Negus.

Verre n° 7, réchauffé:
1 cuiller à café sucre en poudre.
1 verre à madère de xérès.
Emplir d’eau bouillante. 1 zeste de citron.
Remuer. Muscader. Servir.

1923 P. Dagouret: Le barman universel. Seite 110. Soda Negus.

Boisson effervescente, très agréable.
Dans une casserole, chauffer sans bouillir:
1 verre à madère de porto rouge
1 cuiller à bouche sucre en poudre.
1 pincée de muscade, 1 clou de girofle,
Quand bien chaud, verser dans verre n°6 réchauffé.
Emplir soda ou seltz. Servir.

1924 A. Brehmer: Das Mixerbuch. Seite 25. Negus.

Man menge 1 Flasche Portwein oder Sherry
und das doppelte Quantum kochenden Wassers mit
Zucker, etwas Zitronenschale und geriebener Muskat-
nuß und richte an.
Es empfiehlt sich, dieser Mischung auf 12 Gläser
1 Tropfen Ambra- oder 10—12 Tropfen Vanillen-
Essenz beizufügen.

1924 A. Brehmer: Das Mixerbuch. Seite 25. Negus (2).

Man reibe die Schale einer Zitrone auf
250 g Zucker ab, tue ihn mit 8 g ganzem Zimt, 2 g Nel-
ken, 2 g grob gestoßenen Kardamonen und etwas ge-
riebener Muskatnuß in 2 Liter Kochwein, erhitze diesen
bis zum Kochen, gieße 1 1/2 Liter siedendes Wasser und
den Saft von 1 1/2 Zitrone zu und richte an.

1924 A. Brehmer: Das Mixerbuch. Seite 26. Negus (3).

Man menge die Schale und den Saft
einer Zitrone mit 1 Flasche Wein, zuckere und füge
siedendes Wasser nach Belieben hinzu und richte an.

1924 M. E. Steedman & C. H. Senn: Home-Made Summer and Winter Drinks. Seite 46. Negus.

Rub 3 oz. loaf sugar on to the rind of 1
lemon, pound it, and add to it 1 pint port,
1/4 small nutmeg grated, 1 pint boiling water,
and if liked 1 or 2 drops essence of ambergris or
rather more of vanilla. Serve as hot as possible.

1924 M. E. Steedman & C. H. Senn: Home-Made Summer and Winter Drinks. Seite 49. White Wine Negus.

Rub 8 oz. loaf sugar on the rind of 2 lemons
till all the zest is extracted, and put it into a
jug with the strained juice, 1 pint liquid calf’s
foot jelly, 1 inch of bruised cinnamon, 1 blade
of mace, 6 cloves, 1 pinch of allspice, and 1
quart boiling water. Let it stand for 20
minutes, then add 1 bottle white wine, grated
nutmeg to taste and if liked, a little more
sugar, heat in a saucepan and serve at
once.

1925 Carl A. Seutter: Der Mixologist. Seite 49. Soda-Negus.

In eine Kasserolle gebe man 1 Glas Portwein, 3 Stück Würfel-
zucker, einige Nelken und eine Messerspitze Muskatnuß, bringe
es auf Feuer und vermische es mit einem Löffel. Wenn beinahe kochend,
nehme man es vom Feuer, seihe es in ein großes Barglas und gieße
eine Flasche Sodawasser hinzu, mische vorsichtig, damit das Getränk
nicht überschäumt.

1925 Carl A. Seutter: Der Mixologist. Seite 49. Portwein-Sangaree, heiß.

Wie Portwein-Negus; serviere mit Muskatnuß darauf gestreut.

1925 Carl A. Seutter: Der Mixologist. Seite 49. Portwein-Negus.

In ein angewärmtes Punschglas gebe man 2 Stück Würfelzucker,
fülle es 3/4 voll mit heißem Wasser, darauf gieße man es voll mit
Portwein und serviere ohne weitere Zutaten.

1925 Mrs. C. F. Leyel: Summer Drinks and Winter Cordials. Seite 54. Port Wine Negus.

The drink known as Negus was invented by
Colonel Negus in the reign of Queen Anne. It
was originally made ef port, but other sweet wines
can be used.
Put a pint of port wine into a jug with a
quarter of a pound of loaf sugar previously rubbed
on the rind of a lemon. Then squeeze the juice
of the strained lemon on to it, add a quart of
boiling water and a little grated nutmeg.
Cover up, and when cool, drink.

1925 Mrs. C. F. Leyel: Summer Drinks and Winter Cordials. Seite 54. Another Port Negus.

Put into a small tumbler a wineglassful of port,
and two lumps of sugar rubbed on lem on rind.
Half fill the glass with boiling water, add a
small piece of thin lemon rind, and dust with
nutmeg.

1925 Mrs. C. F. Leyel: Summer Drinks and Winter Cordials. Seite 55. Soda Negus for Two.

Heat two wineglasses of port, in which has been
mixed a teaspoonful of icing sugar, a little grated
nutmeg and pounded cloves.
Add a wineglassful of boiling water and a split
bottle of soda water.

1925 Mrs. C. F. Leyel: Summer Drinks and Winter Cordials. Seite 55. Hot White Negus, or Lawn Sleeves.

Rub a quarter of a pound of loaf sugar on the
rind of a lemon, then cut two lemons into thin
slices, add to the sugar with four glasses of liquid
calves’ feet jelly, and small quantities of cinna-
mon, mace, cloves and allspice.
Put all together into a jug, pour over them a
quart of boiling water. Cover the jug closely
and leave for fifteen minutes, then add a bottle of
boiling sauterne or any sweet white wine.
Grate half a nutmeg into it, and add more
sugar if necessary.
Cold white wine Negus is made in the same
way but the mixture is left to get cold, and
then the cold wine is added.
It can be iced, but if so, more sugar will be
needed.

1927 Adolphe Torelli: American Drinks Dictionary. Seite 130. Port-Wine Negus.

Dans un verre à pied,
deux morceaux de sucre, un verre à bordeaux
d’eau bien chaude, trois traits de Curaçao, un
verre de Porto rouge. Remuer, garnir d’une tran-
che de citron piquée de clous de girofle et saupou-
drer de muscade.

1927 Adolphe Torelli: American Drinks Dictionary. Seite 153. Sherry Negus.

Faire chauffer un verre
de Xérès, verser dans un gobelet en cristal, rem-
plir d’eau chaude, ajouter une cuillère de sucre,
remuer, et saupoudrer de muscade.

1927 Anonymus: El arte de hacer un cocktail. Seite 137. Port Wine Negus.

1/2 terrón de azúcar.
2/3 del vaso con agua caliente.
Vasito de vino Oporto.
Revuélvase y polvorearle nuez moscada.

1927 Anonymus: El arte de hacer un cocktail. Seite 178. Soda Negus Punch Bowl.

4 gotas Angostura bitters.
1/2 botella de vino Oporto.
10 ó 12 terrones de azúcar.
12 clavos de especia.
Cucharadita de nuez moscada.
Pónganse esos ingredientes en una friderita, ca-
liéntense y revuélvanse bien, pero no se dejen
hervir.— Se dejará enfriar la mezcla para
añadirle una botella de gaseosa.

1927 Frederick Davies & Seymour Davies: Drinks of All Kinds. Seite 88. Negus.

Negus may be made of sherry or any other sweet wine
(see page 122), but portwine is more usual. Colonel Negus
is said to have invented this beverage.

1927 Frederick Davies & Seymour Davies: Drinks of All Kinds. Seite 88. Port Wine Negus.

Put a pint of port wine into a jug, and rub
some lumps of sugar (equal to a quarter of a
pound) on the rind of a lemon; then squeeze
the juice of the lemon and strain it, adding the
sugar and lemon juice to the port wine, with a
little grated nutmeg. Add to this a quart of
boiling water, cover the jug, and when cooled a
little the beverage will be fit for use.

1927 Frederick Davies & Seymour Davies: Drinks of All Kinds. Seite 88. Port Wine [Negus].

Another Mixture.
Put into a small tumbler one wineglass of port
wine with two small lumps of sugar, and half
fill with boiling water; add a small portion of
the rind of a lemon, and dust with nutmeg.
Soda.

1927 Frederick Davies & Seymour Davies: Drinks of All Kinds. Seite 88. Soda [Negus].

Make hot two wineglasses of port wine, in
which you have put a teaspoonful of icing sugar,
a little grated nutmeg, and a little pounded
cloves; add to this one wineglass of boiling
water and a split bottle of soda-water. This is
a delicious drink, well adapted to those who
do not take punch or potent spirit after supper.

1927 Frederick Davies & Seymour Davies: Drinks of All Kinds. Seite 122. Sherry or other White Wine Negus.

Proceed as directed for Port Wine Negus
(see page 88), but add an additional quarter
of a pound of powdered sugar; when dissolve,
add a bottle of sherry, madeira, or champagne,
and a wineglass of noyeau or maraschino.

1927 Maraya Vélez de Sánchez: Cocktails bebidas heladas ponches de todas clases. Seite 20. Porto Negus.

Se ponen en un vaso a grog dos pedacitos de azúcar,
cuatro gotas de curazao rojo, un vaso de oporto rojo; se
acaba de llenar el vaso con agua caliente, se le pone una
rebanada de limón a la cual se le habrán puesto cuatro cla-
vos de especia y se sirve.

1927 Maraya Vélez de Sánchez: Cocktails bebidas heladas ponches de todas clases. Seite 22. Port Wine Negus.

Se ponen en un vaso una cucharadita de azúcar en polvo,
un poquito de agua caliente para disolverla y un vaso de
oporto rojo; se acaba de llenar el vaso con agua caliente,
se rocia con nuez moscada y se sirve.

1927 Marcel Requien & Lucien Farnoux Reynaud: L’heure du cocktail. Seite 48. Negus.

2 cuillerées de sucre en poudre, 1 trait
Curaçao rouge, 1 verre à Madère de Porto rouge.
Faire chauffer le mélange. Servir avec 1 zeste de citron
et quelques clous de girofle. Saupoudrer de noix
muscade.

1927 Paul E. Lowe: Drinks. Seite 75. Port Wine Negus.

Into a tumbler pour:
1 jigger port wine.
2 level teaspoonfuls bar sugar.
Fill up 3/4 full with hot water; grate
little nutmeg on top and serve.

1927 Paul E. Lowe: Drinks. Seite 85. Soda Negus.

(for a party of 5).
Into a saucepan put:
12 lumps loaf sugar.
8 cloves.
1 teaspoonful grated nutmeg.
Heat and stir well without allowing
the mixture to come to a boil. When
warm pour in a bottle of plain soda.
Serve in punch glasses.

1927 Pedro Chicote: El bar americano en España. Seite 152. Port-Negus.

En una copa de las de agua:
1 cucharada pequeña de azúcar en polvo.
1 copita de oporto.
Termínese de llenar la copa de agua hirviendo
y añádase una rodaja de limón, incrustada de
cuatro clavos (especia) y un poco de nuez mos-
cada rallada.

1928 Charles Nicholas Reinhardt: Cheerio! Seite 38. Port Wine Negus.

Pour a large glass of Port wine into a pitcher. Rub
five or six lumps of sugar against the rind of a lemon
until all the yellow part of the skin is absorbed by the
sugar. Squeeze the lemon juice on the sugar, strain,
and add the lemon juice and sugar to the Port wine.
Add grated nutmeg, fill up with boiling water, cover the
whole, and when cooled off it will be ready to serve.

1928 Jerry Thomas: The Bon Vivant’s Companion. Seite 103. Negus.

THIS is an English beverage and derives its name from
Colonel Negus 1 who is said to have invented it. It may be
made of sherry or any other sweet wine, but it is more
usually made of port.
1 Colonel Francis Negus, of the English Army, who died in 1732.

1928 Jerry Thomas: The Bon Vivant’s Companion. Seite 103. Port Wine Negus.

To every pint of port wine One-quarter pound of loaf
allow. sugar.
One quart of boiling water. One lemon.
. Grated nutmeg to taste.
PUT the wine into a jug, rub some lumps of sugar (equal to
one-fourth pound) on the lemon rind until all the yellow part
of the skin is absorbed, then squeeze the juice and strain it.
Add the sugar and lemon juice to the port wine, with the
grated nutmeg; pour over it the boiling water, cover the
jug, and when the beverage has cooled a little, it will be
fit for use.

1928 Jerry Thomas: The Bon Vivant’s Companion. Seite 103. Port Wine Negus.

Another recipe
One wineglass of port wine. One teaspoonful of sugar.
FILL tumbler one-third full with hot water.

1928 Jerry Thomas: The Bon Vivant’s Companion. Seite 104. Soda Negus.

A MOST refreshing and elegant beverage, particularly for
those who do not take punch or grog after supper, is thus
made:
Put half a pint of port wine, with four lumps of sugar,
three cloves, and enough grated nutmeg to cover a shilling,
into a saucepan; warm it well, but do not suffer it to boil;
pour it into a bowl or jug, and upon the warm wine decant a
bottle of soda water. You will have an effervescing and
delicious negus by this means.

1929 Adolphe Torelli: American Drinks Dictionary. Seite 130. Port-Wine Negus.

Dans un verre à pied,
deux morceaux de sucre, un verre à bordeaux
d’eau bien chaude, trois traits de Curaçao, un
verre de Porto rouge. Remuer, garnir d’une tran-
che de citron piquée de clous de girofle et saupou-
drer de muscade.

1929 Adolphe Torelli: American Drinks Dictionary. Seite 153. Sherry Negus.

Faire chauffer un verre
de Xérès, verser dans un gobelet en cristal, rem-
plir d’eau chaude, ajouter une cuillère de sucre,
remuer, et saupoudrer de muscade.

1929 Jerry Thomas: The Bon Vivant’s Companion. Seite 103. Negus.

THIS is an English beverage and derives its name from
Colonel Negus 1 who is said to have invented it. It may be
made of sherry or any other sweet wine, but it is more
usually made of port.
1 Colonel Francis Negus, of the English Army, who died in 1732.

1929 Jerry Thomas: The Bon Vivant’s Companion. Seite 103. Port Wine Negus.

To every pint of port wine One-quarter pound of loaf
allow. sugar.
One quart of boiling water. One lemon.
. Grated nutmeg to taste.
PUT the wine into a jug, rub some lumps of sugar (equal to
one-fourth pound) on the lemon rind until all the yellow part
of the skin is absorbed, then squeeze the juice and strain it.
Add the sugar and lemon juice to the port wine, with the
grated nutmeg; pour over it the boiling water, cover the
jug, and when the beverage has cooled a little, it will be
fit for use.

1929 Jerry Thomas: The Bon Vivant’s Companion. Seite 103. Port Wine Negus.

Another recipe
One wineglass of port wine. One teaspoonful of sugar.
FILL tumbler one-third full with hot water.

1929 Jerry Thomas: The Bon Vivant’s Companion. Seite 104. Soda Negus.

A MOST refreshing and elegant beverage, particularly for
those who do not take punch or grog after supper, is thus
made:
Put half a pint of port wine, with four lumps of sugar,
three cloves, and enough grated nutmeg to cover a shilling,
into a saucepan; warm it well, but do not suffer it to boil;
pour it into a bowl or jug, and upon the warm wine decant a
bottle of soda water. You will have an effervescing and
delicious negus by this means.

1929 P. Dagouret: Le barman universel. Seite 110. Port-Wine Negus.

Verre n° 7 réchauffe:
1 cuiller à café sucre en poudre.
1 verre à madère porto rouge.
Emplir d’eau bouillante. Zeste de citron.
Remuer. Muscader. Servir.

1929 P. Dagouret: Le barman universel. Seite 112. Sherry Negus.

Verre n° 7, réchauffé:
1 cuiller à café sucre en poudre.
1 verre à madère de xérès.
Emplir d’eau bouillante. 1 zeste de citron.
Remuer. Muscader. Servir.

1929 P. Dagouret: Le barman universel. Seite 112. Soda Negus.

Boisson effervescente, très agréable.
Dans une casserole, chauffer sans bouillir:
1 verre à madère de porto rouge
1 cuiller à bouche sucre en poudre.
1 pincée de muscade, 1 clou de girofle.
Quand bien chaud, verser dans verre n°6 réchauffé.
Emplir soda ou seltz. Servir.

1930 Charles Nicholas Reinhardt: Cheerio! Seite 29. Port Wine Negus.

Pour a large glass of Port wine into a pitcher. Rub
five or six lumps of sugar against the rind of a lemon
until all the yellow part of the skin is absorbed by the
sugar. Squeeze the lemon juice on the sugar, strain, and
add the lemon Juice and sugar to the Port wine. Add
grated nutmeg, fill up with boiling water, cover the whole,
and when cooled off it will be ready to serve.

1930 Gerardo Corrales: Club de cantineros de la Republica de Cuba. Seite 100. Port Wine Negus.

1/2 terrón de azúcar.
Vaso con dos terceras partes de agua caliente.
Vasito de vino Oporto.
Revuélvase. Polvorear con nuez noscada.

1930 Gerardo Corrales: Club de cantineros de la Republica de Cuba. Seite 114. Soda Negus Punch Bowl.

Gotas Angostura.
1/2 botella vino Oporto.
10 ó 12 terrones de azúcar.
12 clavos de cocina.
Cucharadita de nuez noscada.
Póngase todo en un recipiente a calentar, re-
volviéndose sin dejar hervir. Quitese de la
candela y revuélvase hasta que enfríe.
Agréguesele 1/2 de agua mineral en la ponchera.
Sírvase en tazas.

1930 Knut W. Sundin: Two Hundred Selected Drinks. Seite 67. Port Negus.

Fill a stew pan with following ingredients:
3 pieces of sugar
A few dashes of any liqueur
5 cloves
1 wine glass of Portwine
Half a wine glass of Cognac Brandy.
Let boil and serve in a tumbler, add some
grated nutmeg on top.

1930 William T. Boothby: “Cocktail Bill” Boothby’s World Drinks. Seite 135. Port Negus.

Port . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 jiggers Sugar Syrup . . . . . . . . . . . 1 spoon
Spice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . to taste Hot Water . . . . . . . . . . . . to fill
Stir all in highball glass, dust spice over and serve with spoon.

1930 William T. Boothby: “Cocktail Bill” Boothby’s World Drinks. Seite 145. Port Negus.

Port . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 jiggers Sugar Syrup . . . . . . . . . . . 1 spoon
Stir well with ice, pour into chilled cocktail glass and serve.

1931 Dominique Migliorero: L’Art du shaker. Seite 62. Sherry Negus.

Dans un verre ballon moyen: 1 cuillerée à café de sucre
en poudre, un peu d’eau chaude pour fondre le sucre, 1 verre
de Dry Sherry.
Remplir le vere d’eau boillante. Remuer. Garnier d’une
tranche de citron. Servir.

1932 Niels Larsen: 156 recettes de boissons américaines. Seite 91. Port Negus.

[A préparer dans un verre à grog.]
2 morceaux de sucre. Ajoutez:
4 gouttes de curaçao rouge;
1 verre à madère de porto rouge.
Remplissez le verre d’eau et faites chauffer
presque bouillant.
Servez avec une tranche de citron piquée de
quatre clous de girofle et un peu de muscade
râpée.

1933 Alma Witacker: Bacchus behave. Seite 139. Negus.

One quart of port wine, warmed.
One quart of boiling water.
One wineglassful of brandy.
Nutmeg to taste.

1933 Anonymus: 300 Drinks and How to Mix ’em. Seite 26. Port Wine Negus.

(A small bar glass)
1 tea-spoon sugar.
1 wine glass Port wine.
Fill glass 1/3 full of hot water.
Grate a little nutmeg on top. Serve.

1933 Anonymus: 300 Drinks and How to Mix ’em. Seite 66. Soda Negus.

(Use a small punch bowl; about 1 quart)
1 pint of port wine.
12 lumps of loaf sugar.
8 cloves.
Grated nutmeg sufficient to fill a small tea-spoon;
put the above ingredients Into a thoroughly clean
saucepan, warm and stir them well, but do not suffer
It to boil; upon the warm wine empty a bottle of plain
soda. This makes a delicious and refreshing drink.

1933 Anonymus: Here’s How to Mix ’em. Seite 26. Port Wine Negus.

(A small bar glass)
1 tea-spoon sugar.
1 wine glass Port wine.
Fill glass 1/3 full of hot water.
Grate a little nutmeg on top. Serve.

1933 Anonymus: Here’s How to Mix ’em. Seite 66. Soda Negus.

(Use a small punch bowl; about 1 quart)
1 pint of port wine.
12 lumps of loaf sugar.
8 cloves.
Grated nutmeg sufficient to fill a small tea-spoon;
put the above ingredients Into a thoroughly clean
saucepan, warm and stir them well, but do not suffer
It to boil; upon the warm wine empty a bottle of plain
soda. This makes a delicious and refreshing drink.

1933 Anonymus: The Bartender’s Friend. Seite 113. Port Negus.

Port Wine Put 1 cube of sugar into a small tum-
Sugar bler 1/3 full of hot water, fill with wine,
Water stir, and sprinkle with nutmeg.
Nutmeg

1933 Fred W. Swan: When Good Fellows Get Together. Seite 47. Port Wine Negus.

(use small bar glass)
1 teaspoon sugar.
1 wineglass Port Wine.
1/3 glass hot water.
Top with grated nutmeg, and serve.

1933 Fred W. Swan: When Good Fellows Get Together. Seite 73. Soda Negus.

(use a quart punch bowl)
1 pint Port Wine.
12 pieces loaf sugar.
8 cloves.
1 teaspoon nutmeg.
Put ingredients in a clean sauce pan,
warm, and stir well. (Do not allow to boil.)
Into the warm wine, pour a bottle of plain
Soda Water.

1933 George A. Lurie: Here’s How. Seite 145. Port Negus.

Port . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 jiggers Sugar Syrup . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 spoon
Spice . . . . . . . . . . . . to taste Hot Water . . . . . . . . . . . . . to fill
Stir all in highball glass, dust spice over and serve with
spoon.

1933 George A. Lurie: Here’s How. Seite 145. Port Negus.

Port wine . . . . . . . . . 2 jiggers Sugar Syrup . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 spoon
Stir well with ice, pour into chilled cocktail glass and
serve.

1933 George Albert Zabriskie: The Bon Vivanrt’s Companion. Seite 55. Port Wine Negus.

To every pint of port wine allow
1 quart boiling water
1/4 pound loaf sugar
1 lemon
Crated nutmeg to taste
Put the wine into a jug; rub some lumps of sugar
(equal to 1/4 pound) on the lemon rind until all the yellow
part of the skin is absorbed, then squeeze the juice and
strain it. Add the sugar and lemon juice to the port wine,
with the grated nutmeg; pour over it the boiling water,
cover the jug, and when the beverage has cooled a little
it will be fit for use. Negus may also be made of sherry
or any other sweet wine, but it is more usually made of
port. This beverage derives its name from Colonel Negus,
who is said to have invented it.

1933 Harry Todd: Mixer’s Guide. Seite 95. Soda Negus.

(FOR A PARTY OF TEN)
Use a punch bowl or other suitable vessel.
Twenty-four lumps of loaf sugar.
Fourteen cloves.
Two teaspoonfuls of grated nutmeg.
One quart of port wine.
Put above ingredients into a saucepan; heat and stir well, do
not allow mixture to boil. Pour in two bottles of soda water.
Serve in punch glasses.

1933 Harry Todd: Mixer’s Guide. Seite 102. Port Wine Negus.

Use small bar glass.
One wine glass of port wine.
One teaspoonful of fine sugar.
Fill glass with hot water; grate a little nutmeg on top and serve.

1933 Jacob Abraham Grohusko: Jack’s Manual. Seite 205. Soda Negus Bowl Punch.

(Use small punch bowl)
1 pint of port wine
1/2 tablespoonful angostura bitters
12 lumps of loaf sugar
12 cloves
1 teaspoonful nutmeg
Put above ingredients into a saucepan, warm, and stir well;
do not let it boil. Pour on this mixture one bottle of plain soda.
Put in punch bowl and serve in cups.

1933 Julien J. Proskauer: What’ll You Have. Seite 98. Port Wine Negus.

(USE A SMALL GLASS)
One teaspoonful of sugar,
One wine-glass of port wine,
Fill the glass one-third full of hot water.
Grate a little nutmeg on top and serve.

1933 P. Dagouret: Le barman universel. Seite 110. Port-Wine Negus.

Verre n° 7 réchauffe:
1 cuiller à café sucre en poudre.
1 verre à madère porto rouge.
Emplir d’eau bouillante. Zeste de citron.
Remuer. Muscader. Servir.

1933 P. Dagouret: Le barman universel. Seite 112. Sherry Negus.

Verre n° 7, réchauffé:
1 cuiller à café sucre en poudre.
1 verre à madère de xérès.
Emplir d’eau bouillante. 1 zeste de citron.
Remuer. Muscader. Servir.

1933 P. Dagouret: Le barman universel. Seite 112. Soda Negus.

Boisson effervescente, très agréable.
Dans une casserole, chauffer sans bouillir:
1 verre à madère de porto rouge
1 cuiller à bouche sucre en poudre.
1 pincée de muscade, 1 clou de girofle.
Quand bien chaud, verser dans verre n°6 réchauffé.
Emplir soda ou seltz. Servir.

1933 R. C. Miller: The American Bar Guide. Seite 45. Port Wine Negus.

To every pint of port wine allow:
1 quart of boiling water.
1/2 lb. of loaf sugar.
1 lemon.
Grated nutmeg to taste.
Put the wine into a jug, rub some lumps of sugar
(equal to 1/4 lb.) on the lemon rind until all the yellow
part of the skin is absorbed, then squeeze the juice and
strain it. Add the sugar and lemon-juice to the port wine,
with the grated nutmeg; pour over it the boiling water,
cover the jug, and when the beverage has cooled a little,
it will be fit for use. Negus may also be made of sherry,
or any other sweet wine, but it is more usually made of
Pop-Pi-Ya wine.

1933 R. C. Miller: The American Bar Guide. Seite 45. Port Wine Negus.

(Use small bar glass)
1 wine-glass of port wine.
1 teaspoonful of sugar.
Fill tumbler one-third full with hot water.

1933 R. C. Miller: The American Bar Guide. Seite 46. Soda Negus.

A most refreshing and elegant beverage, particularly
for those who do not take punch or grog after supper, is
thus made:
Put half a pint of port wine, with four lumps of sugar,
three cloves, and enough grated nutmeg to cover a shilling,
into a saucepan; warm it well, but do not suffer it to
boil; pour it into a bowl or jug, and upon the warm wine
decant a bottle of soda-water. You will have an effervesc-
ing and delicious negus by this means.

1934b Tom and Jerry: How to Mix Drinks. Seite 43. Port Wine Negus.

(Use a small bar glass.)
1/2 tablespoon powdered sugar.
1 wine-glass Port wine.
Fill glass one-third full of hot water.
Grate a little nutmeg on top. Serve.

1934b Tom and Jerry: How to Mix Drinks. Seite 91. Soda Negus.

(Use a small punch bowl; about 1 quart.)
1 pint of Port wine.
12 lumps of loaf sugar.
8 cloves.
Grated nutmeg sufficient to fill a small teaspoon;
put the above ingredients into a thoroughly clean
saucepan, warm and stir them well, but do not suffer
it to boil; upon the warm wine empty a bottle of
plain soda. This makes a delicious and refreshing
drink.

1934 Anonymus: A Life-Time Collection of 688 Recipes for Drinks. Seite 78. Port Wine Negus.

1/2 lump of sugar 1 jigger Port Wine. Stir
Fill glass 2/3 hot water Grated nutmeg on top

1934 Anonymus: The Complete Bartender’s Guide. Seite 43. Port Wine Negus.

(Use a small bar glass.)
1/2 tablespoon powdered sugar.
1 wine-glass Port wine.
Fill glass one-third full of hot water.
Grate a little nutmeg on top. Serve.

1934 Anonymus: The Complete Bartender’s Guide. Seite 91. Soda Negus.

(Use a small punch bowl; about 1 quart.)
1 pint of Port wine.
12 lumps of loaf sugar.
8 cloves.
Grated nutmeg sufficient to fill a small teaspoon;
put the above ingredients into a thoroughly clean
saucepan, warm and stir them well, but do not suffer
it to boil; upon the warm wine empty a bottle of
plain soda. This makes a delicious and r efreshing
drink.

1934 Charles Nicholas Reinhardt: Punches and Cocktails. Seite 29. Port Wine Negus.

Pour a large glass of Port wine into a pitcher. Rub
five or six lumps of sugar against the rind of a lemon
until all the yellow part of the skin is absorbed by the
sugar. Squeeze the lemon juice on the sugar, strain, and
add the lemon juice and sugar to the Port wine. Add
grated nutmeg, fill up with boiling water, cover the whole,
and when cooled off it will be ready to serve.

1934 Harry Johnson: The new and Improved Illustrated Bartender’s Guide. Seite 233. Soda Negus.

(Use a small punch bowl; about one quart.)
1 pint of port wine;
12 lumps of white loaf sugar;
8 cloves;
Grated nutmeg, sufficient to fill a small tea spoon;
Put the above ingredients into a thoroughly clean
sauce pan, warm and stir them well, but do not suffer
it to boil; upon the warm wine empty a bottle of plain
soda water. This makes a delicious and refreshing
drink.

1934 Magnus Bredenbek: What Shall I Drink. Seite 102. Port Wine Negus.

Use a small goblet for this and mix a tablespoon of
“gum” with one small wineglass of Port Wine and the balance
of the glass filled with hot water. Top with grated nutmeg
and drink.

1934 William T. Boothby: “Cocktail Bill” Boothby’s World Drinks. Seite 232. Port Negus.

Port . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 1/2 jiggers Sugar Syrup . . . . . . . . . . . 1 spoon
Spice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . to taste Hot Water . . . . . . . . . . . . to fill
Stir all in highball glass, dust spice over and serve with spoon.

1934 William T. Boothby: “Cocktail Bill” Boothby’s World Drinks. Seite 244. Port Negus.

Port . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 jiggers Sugar Syrup . . . . . . . . . . . 1 spoon
Stir well with ice, pour into chilled cocktail glass and serve.

1935 Adrian: Cocktail Fashions of 1936. Seite 113. Soda Negus Punch Bowl.

4 dashes of Angostura bitters.
1 pint of port wine.
10 or 12 lumps loaf sugar.
12 whole cloves.
1 teaspoon nutmeg.
Put above ingredients into saucepan, warm and
stir well. Do not let it boil. Remove this
mixture to cool, then add 1 pint soda in punch
and serve in cups.

1936 Anonymus: The Art of Mixing Drinks. Seite 91. Negus.

Negus is a beverage consisting of wine, wat­-
er, sugar, nutmeg and lemon juice and is so
called from Colonel Francis Negus, (d 1732)
who claimed to be the inventor of the formula.
It is very much a favorite in England and has
been so for more than 200 years.

1936 Anonymus: The Art of Mixing Drinks. Seite 91. Port Wine Negus.

To every pint of wine allow:
1 Quart boiling water
1/4 Pound of loaf sugar
1 Lemon
Grated nutmeg to taste
Put the wine, in a jug or earthen vessel, rub
some lumps of sugar on the lemon rind until
all the yellow part of the skin is absorbed, then
squeeze the juice from the lemon and strain it.
Add the sugar and lemon juice to the port wine,
with the grated nutmeg; pour over it the boil­
ing water, cover the jug, and when the bever­-
age has cooled a little, it will be fit for use.
Negus may also be made of sherry, or any oth­-
er sweet wine, but it is usually made of port.

1936 Anonymus: The Art of Mixing Drinks. Seite 92. Soda Negus.

1/2 Pint of port wine
4 Lumps of sugar
3 Cloves
Grated nutmeg to cover a dime
Place the ingredients in a saucepan and
warm it well but do not permit it to boil, pour
it into a bowl and into it pour a bottle of plain
soda water. This makes a delicious and effer­-
vescing negus.

1936 Frank A. Thomas: Wines, Cocktails and other Drinks. Seite 207. Port Negus.

1/2 bottle Port 1 lemon
1/2 lump of sugar 1 qt. boiling water
Rub the sugar on the lemon rind, then squeeze the lemon
to get juice. Mix the Port, sugar, and lemon juice with a
little nutmeg, add the boiling water, and serve while hot.
Serves 4 to 6.

1936 Frank A. Thomas: Wines, Cocktails and other Drinks. Seite 208. Soda Negus.

1/4 bottle Port 8 to 10 cloves
12 lumps of sugar 1/2 teaspoon grated nutmeg
. 1/4 bottle sparkling water
Put in a saucepan, bring to boiling point but do not
let boil. Add the sparkling water and serve at once. Serves
2 to 4.

1936 Frank Meier: The Artistry of Mixing Drinks. Seite 67. Port Wine Negus.

In small heated tumbler: one
lump of Sugar dissolved in
little boiling water, one glass
of red Port; add boiling water
for desired temperature, grate
Nutmeg on top and serve.

1936 Frank Meier: The Artistry of Mixing Drinks. Seite 67. Sherry Wine Negus.

The same as Port Wine Negus,
except use sweet Sherry.

1937 R. de Fleury: 1800 – And All That. Seite 8. Excellent Negus.

1 Bottle Sherry or Port
2 1/2 Pints Water
Juice of a Lemon, and
part of the Peel rubbed
on Sugar. Grated Nut­-
meg and Sugar to taste.
1 drop Essence of Am­-
bergris, or 10 drops
Essence of Vanilla.
Heat slightly and serve
warm.

1937 R. de Fleury: 1800 – And All That. Seite 13. Negus.

Peel a Lemon very
thin. Add Juice of
same and a bottle of
Wine. Sugar to taste,
and Boiling Water to
strength desired.

1937 R. de Fleury: 1800 – And All That. Seite 14. Port Negus (Hot) – No. 1.

Use a tumbler
1 Teaspoonful Sugar
1 Glass of Port Wine
Fill with boiling water
Grate a little Nutmeg
on top

1937 R. de Fleury: 1800 – And All That. Seite 14. Port Negus – No. 2.

Put a pint of Port into
a jug and rub a quarter
of a pound of Lump
Sugar on the rind of a
Lemon. Then squeeze
the Juice of the Lemon
and strain it, adding
the Juice of the Lemon
and the Sugar with a
little grated Nutmeg
to the Port. Add a
quart of Boiling Water,
cover the jug and allow
to stand till cool, and
then serve.

1937 R. de Fleury: 1800 – And All That. Seite 16. Sherry Negus.

This is made in the
same way as a Negus,
but half a pound of
Sugar is used, and
Sherry in place of Port.
Also add a wineglass of
Noyeau of Maraschino.

1937 R. de Fleury: 1800 – And All That. Seite 16. Soda Negus – No. 1.

Put 1/2 pint Port into a
saucepan with 4 lumps
of Sugar, 3 Cloves, and
enough grated Nutmeg
to cover a shilling.
Warm, but do not
allow to boil. Pour
into a jug and add
a bottle of Soda Water.

1937 R. de Fleury: 1800 – And All That. Seite 82. “Negus”.

Copyright by
S. T. Yakimovitch
1/20 Grenadine
1/10 Pollen’s White
Curacao
1/4 Lemon Juice
3/5 Negrita Rum (Bar-
dinet)
Shake.

1937 R. de Fleury: 1800 – And All That. Seite 224. Port Wine Negus.

1/2 Tablespoonful Sugar
1 Glass of Port
Serve in a medium-size
glass and fill up with
Hot Water. Serve
with grated Nutmeg on
top.

1937 R. de Fleury: 1800 – And All That. Seite 301. Soda Negus Punch Bowl.

4 Dashes of Angostura
Bitters
1 Pint of Port
10 or 12 Lumps of
Sugar
12 Whole Cloves
1 Teaspoonful Nutmeg
Put the above ingredi­-
ents into a saucepan,
warm and stir well.
Do not let it boil. Re-­
move this mixture to
cool, then add 1 pint
Soda in Punch and
serve in Cups.

1937 Salvador Trullos Mateu: Recetario internacional de cock-tails. Seite 155. Port Wine Negus.

Medio terrón de azúcar.
Vaso con dos terceras partes de agua ca-
liente.
Vasito de vino Oporto.
Revuélvase. Polvorear con nuez moscada.

1937 Salvador Trullos Mateu: Recetario internacional de cock-tails. Seite 172. Soda Negus Punch Bowl.

Gotas angostura.
Media botella vino Oporto.
Diez o doce terrones de azúcar.
Doce clavos de cocina.
Cucharadita de nuez moscada.
Póngase todo en un recipiente a calentar,
revolviéndose sin dejar hervir. Quítese de la
candela y revuélvase hasta que enfríe.
Agréguesele media botella de agua mineral
SAN AG USTIN en la ponchera.
Sirvase en tazas.

1937 William J. Tarling: Café Royal Cocktail Book. Negus Invented by S. T. Yakimovitch.

1/10 Grenadine.
1/10 Pollen’s White Curaçao.
2/10 Lemon Juice.
6/10 Negrita Rum.
Shake.

1938 Jean Lupoiu: Cocktails. Porto Negus.

Mettez dans une petite casserole:
La moitié d’une cuillerée à café de sucre,
1 jet de Crème de Cassis, 1 verre de Porto
Silva.
Chauffer sans le faire bouillir, verser
dans le gobelet en ajoutant une tranche de
citron transpercée de quatre clous de girofle.
Servir.

1939 Amrose Heath: Good Drinks. Seite 76. Negus.

Put a pint of Port Wine into a jug, adding four
ounces of lump Sugar which have been rubbed
on the rind of a Lemon. Add the strained juice of
the Lemon, a little grated Nutmeg and a quart of
boiling water. Cover, and when cool, drink it.

1939 Amrose Heath: Good Drinks. Seite 76. Another Negus.

Mix a teaspoonful of Icing Sugar with two
wineglasses of Port, adding a little grated Nut­-
meg and pounded Cloves. Moisten further with
a wineglassful of boiling water and a split of
Soda.

1939 Amrose Heath: Good Drinks. Seite 77. White Wine Negus.

See LAWN SLEEVES (p. 74).

Seite 74. Lawn Sleeves.

Take a quarter of a pound of lump Sugar, and
rub this on the rind of a Lemon until you have
rubbed off all the yellow part. Then add to this
two Lemons cut in thin slices, four wineglasses of
liquid Calf’s Foot Jelly, and a discreet flavouring
of Cinnamon, Mace, Cloves, and Allspice. Put
these into a jug together and pour over a quart of
boiling water. Put a lid on the jug, leave it for a
quarter of an hour, and then add a bottle of Sau-
ternes or any sweet wine. Grate a Nutmeg into it,
and sweeten further if desired.

1940 Charles: The Cocktail Book. Seite 148. Port Wine Negus.

1 wine-glassful of port wine,
1 lemon,
Sugar to taste.
Put the wine in a long glass, and add the sugar and the
rind and juice of the lemon. Fill up with boiling water,
and strain.

1945 George Gardner: Hoe to be a bartender. Seite 47. Port Wine Negus.

Use small bar glass.
Sugar, 1/2 tablespoonful.
Port wine, 1 wineglass.
Hot water; fill glass 1-3 full.
Sprinkle with nutmeg and serve.

1947 A. Vermeys: Cocktails. Seite 72. Porto Negus.

Mettre dans une petite casserole, la moitié
d’une cuillerée de sucre: 1 trait de Crème de
Cassis: 1 verre de Porto Sandeman. Chauffer
sans le faire bouillir, verser dans le gobelet
en ajoutant une tranche de citron transpersée
de quatre clous de girofle. Servir.

1947 A. Vermeys: Cocktails. Seite 72. Port Wine Negus.

1 verre de Porto rouge Sandeman; 2 traits
de Cognac. Faire blanchir avec des girofles,
cannelle, 1 morceau de sucre. Garnir d’une
tranche de citron.

1948 Adolphe Torelli. 900 recettes de cocktails et boissons aéricaines. Seite 153. Sherry Negus.

Faire chauffer un verre
de Xérès, verser dans un gobelet en cristal, rem-
plir d’eau chaude, ajouter une cuillère de sucre,
remuer, et saupoudrer de muscade.

1948 David A. Embury: The Fine Art of Mixing Drinks. Seite 334. Negus.

The Negus is a sweetened, spiced wine (usually port)
served with hot water. It is quite similar to the Mulls
but differs from them traditionally in that, with the
one, the wine is heated by the hot-poker (or saucepan)
method, whereas, with the other, the wine is heated
by the addition of hot water. The drink is said to have
been invented during the reign of Queen Anne by one
Colonel Francis Negus.

NEGUS
1 quart Port
1 tablespoonful Sugar
Grated Peel of 1 Lemon
Juice of 2 Lemons
Spices as desired
1 quart boiling Water
Warm the wine but do not let it boil. Pour into a
heated jug with the sugar, lemon, and spices and let
stand where all will keep warm for 10 to 15 minutes.
Add the boiling water, stir well, and serve piping hot.
If preferred, the sugar and spices may be boiled in the
water and then added to the warm wine.
Other wines, either heavy or light, may be used.
The light wines, such as claret or burgundy, may be
boiled, but port, sherry, or Madeira should never be
allowed to boil.
For choice and quantity of spices, see under Mulls,
above.

1948 Georg Albert Zabriskie: The Bon Vivant’s Companion. Seite 71. Port Wine Negus.

To every pint of port wine allow
1 quart boiling water
1/4 pound loaf sugar
1 lemon
Grated nutmeg to taste
Put the wine into a jug; rub some lumps of sugar (equal to 1/4
pound) on the lemon rind until all the yellow part of the skin is
absorbed, then squeeze the juice and strain it. Add the sugar and
lemon juice to the port wine, with the grated nutmeg; pour over
it the boiling water, cover the jug, and when the beverage has
cooled a little it will be fit for use. Negus may also be made of
sherry or any other sweet wine, but it is more usually made of
port. This beverage derives its name from Colonel Negus, who is
said to have invented it.

1948 Hilario Alonso Sanchez: El arte del cantinero. Seite 418. Port Wine Negus.

1/4 cuadradillo de azúcar.
1 vasito de vino de Oporto.
2/3 partes de un vaso de agua
caliente.
Revuélvase, y sírvase en
su vaso espolvoreando por
arriba nuez moscada.

1948 Hilario Alonso Sanchez: El arte del cantinero. Seite 438. Soda Negus Punch Bowl.

Gotas de Angostura.
1/2 botella de vino de Oporto.
10 ó 12 terrones de azúcar.
12 clavos de especias.
Cucharadita de nuez mosca-
da en polvo.
Póngase a hervir todo en
cacerola bien limpia, revol-
viéndose. Sepárese del fue-
go después de hervir y re-
vuélvase hasta que se enfríe.
Pásese» después, a una pon-
chera, agregúesele agua mi-
neral y sírvase en tazas.

1948 Jean Lupoiu: Cocktails. Seite 88. Porto Negus.

Mettez dans une petite casserole:
La moitié d’une cuillerée à café de sucre,
1 jet de Crème de Cassis, 1 verre de Porto.
Chauffer sans le faire bouillir, verser
dans le gobelet en ajoutant une tranche de
citron transpercée de quatre clous de girofle.
girofle.
Servir.

1948 Maurice Bonnet: Le livre d’or du bar americain. Seite 70. Port-Negus.

Faites chauffer 1/3 eau, 2/3 Porto avec un
brin de canelle, 1 clou de girofle. Ajoutez une
cuiller de sucre en poudre. Avant l’ébullition
verser dans un verre à pied contenant 2 tran-
ches de citron et 1/2 verre à liqueur de Marc.
Servir bien chaud.

1948 P. Dagouret: Le barman universel 10. Seite 112. Port-Wine Negus.

Verre n° 7 réchauffe:
1 cuiller à café sucre en poudre.
1 verre à madère porto rouge.
Emplir d’eau bouillante. Zeste de citron.
Remuer. Muscader. Servir.

1948 P. Dagouret: Le barman universel 10. Seite 114. Sherry Negus.

Verre n° 7, réchauffé:
1 cuiller à café sucre en poudre.
1 verre à madère de xérès.
Emplir d’eau bouillante. 1 zeste de citron.
Remuer. Muscader. Servir.

1948 P. Dagouret: Le barman universel 10. Seite 114. Soda Negus.

Boisson effervescente, très agréable.
Dans une casserole, chauffer sans bouillir:
1 verre à madère de porto rouge
1 cuiller à bouche sucre en poudre.
1 pincée de muscade, 1 clou de girofle.
Quand bien chaud, verser dans verre n°6 réchauffé.
Emplir soda ou seltz. Servir.

1948 P. Dagouret: Le barman universel 11. Seite 112. Port-Wine Negus.

Verre n° 7 réchauffe:
1 cuiller à café sucre en poudre.
1 verre à madère porto rouge.
Emplir d’eau bouillante. Zeste de citron.
Remuer. Muscader. Servir.

1948 P. Dagouret: Le barman universel 11. Seite 114. Sherry Negus.

Verre n° 7, réchauffé:
1 cuiller à café sucre en poudre.
1 verre à madère de xérès.
Emplir d’eau bouillante. 1 zeste de citron.
Remuer. Muscader. Servir.

1948 P. Dagouret: Le barman universel 11. Seite 114. Soda Negus.

Boisson effervescente, très agréable.
Dans une casserole, chauffer sans bouillir:
1 verre à madère de porto rouge
1 cuiller à bouche sucre en poudre.
1 pincée de muscade, 1 clou de girofle.
Quand bien chaud, verser dans verre n°6 réchauffé.
Emplir soda ou seltz. Servir.

1948 Trader Vic: Bartender’s Guide. Seite 320. Port Wine Negus.

1 1/2 oz. port wine 1/2 tbs. powdered sugar
Stir in wineglass and fill one third with boiling water. Dust
with nutmeg.

1949 Harry Schraemli: Das große Lehrbuch der Bar. Seite 314. Brandy-Negus.

In eine kleine Kasserolle gibt man 2 Glas Cognac,
2 Gewürznelken, 1 etwa 2 cm grosses Stückchen Zimt
und reibt eine Idee Muskatnuss auf das Ganze. Dieses
lässt man kurz zum Sieden kommen, seiht es in einen
grossen Tumbler und füllt auf mit Sodawasser.

1949 Harry Schraemli: Das große Lehrbuch der Bar. Seite 359. Gin-Negus.

In eine kleine Kasserolle gibt man 2 Glas Gin, 2 Ge-
würznelken, 1 ca. 2 cm grosses Stückchen Zimt und
reibt eine Idee Muskatnuss darauf. Das Ganze lässt
man auf kleinem Feuer zum Sieden kommen und seiht
es in einen grossen Tumbler. Man füllt auf mit Soda-
wasser und serviert mit Barlöffel.

1949 Harry Schraemli: Das große Lehrbuch der Bar. Seite 416. Portwine-Negus.

In eine kleine Kasserolle gibt man 2 Glas Portwein
rot, 2 Gewürznelken, 1 kleines Stückchen Zimt und
reibt eine Idee Muskatnuss darauf. Das Ganze lässt
man auf kleinem Feuer auf den Siedepunkt kommen,
seiht es in einen grossen Tumbler und füllt auf mit
Sodawasser oder frischem Wasser.

1949 Harry Schraemli: Das große Lehrbuch der Bar. Seite 430. Rum-Negus.

In eine kleine Kasserolle gibt man 2 Glas Rum, 2 Ge-
würznelken, ein etwa 2 cm grosses Stückchen Zimt und
reibt eine Idee Muskatnuss darauf. Das Ganze lässt
man kurz zum Sieden kommen, seiht es in einen
grossen Tumbler und füllt auf mit Soda- oder Trink-
wasser.

1949 Harry Schraemli: Das große Lehrbuch der Bar. Seite 439. Sherry-Negus.

In eine kleine Kasserolle gibt man 2 Glas Sherry, zwei
Gewürznelken, 1 ca. 2 cm grosses Stückchen Zimt und
reibt eine Idee Muskatnuss darauf. Das ganze lässt
man auf kleinem Feuer auf den Siedepunkt kommen,
seiht es in einen grossen Tumbler und füllt auf mit
Sodawasser.

1949 Harry Schraemli: Das große Lehrbuch der Bar. Seite 456. Vermouth-Negus.

In eine kleine Kasserolle gibt man 2 Glas franz. Ver­-
mouth, 3 Teelöffel Zucker, 2 Gewürznelken, 1 etwa
2 cm grosses Stückchen Zimt und reibe eine Idee Mus-
katnuss darauf. Das Ganze lässt man auf kleinem
Feuer auf den Siedepunkt kommen, seiht es in einen
grossen Tumbler und füllt auf mit Sodawasser oder
frischem Wasser.

1949 Harry Schraemli: Das große Lehrbuch der Bar. Seite 464. Whisky-Negus.

In eine kleine Kasserolle gibt man 2 Glas Whisky, –
2 Gewürznelken, ein ca. 2 cm grosses Stückchen Zimt
und reibt eine Idee Muskatnuss darauf. Das Ganze lässt
man auf kleinem Feuer auf den Siedepunkt kommen,
seiht es in einen grossen Tumbler und füllt auf mit
Sodawasser oder frischem Wasser.

1949 P. Dagouret: Le barman universel. Seite 112. Port-Wine Negus.

Verre n° 7 réchauffe:
1 cuiller à café sucre en poudre.
1 verre à madère porto rouge.
Emplir d’eau bouillante. Zeste de citron.
Remuer. Muscader. Servir.

1949 P. Dagouret: Le barman universel. Seite 114. Sherry Negus.

Verre n° 7, réchauffé:
1 cuiller à café sucre en poudre.
1 verre à madère de xérès.
Emplir d’eau bouillante. 1 zeste de citron.
Remuer. Muscader. Servir.

1949 P. Dagouret: Le barman universel. Seite 114. Soda Negus.

Boisson effervescente, très agréable.
Dans une casserole, chauffer sans bouillir:
1 verre à madère de porto rouge
1 cuiller à bouche sucre en poudre.
1 pincée de muscade, 1 clou de girofle.
Quand bien chaud, verser dans verre n°6 réchauffé.
Emplir soda ou seltz. Servir.

1949 Wilhelm Stürmer: Cocktails by William. Seite 75. Negus.

Ich wette, daß Du beim Namen Negus an den Äthiopierkaiser denkst, der
mit einer Löwenmähne als Kopfschmuck über seine braunen Völker herrscht.
Doch es ist jemand anderes, dem Du Achtung zollen sollst: einem Soldaten,
namens Negus. Dieses herzhafte Getränk trägt den Namen des Obersten
Franziskus Negus, der 1732 ins Gras beißen mußte, jedoch nicht wegen
übergroßer Schwäche für den süffigen Portwein. Wer könnte das auch von
einem alten Haudegen annehmen, der die ewig durstige Kehle eines
tapferen Soldaten hatte, und der die dickbauchigen, mit edlem rubinrotem
Nass gefüllten Weinkrüge des 18. Jahrhunderts sehr gut kannte!
Ein „Negus” muß nicht unbedingt aus Portwein hergestellt werden. Man
kann alle Süßweine verwenden, doch darf man dann an ihre Echtheit nicht
so große Ansprüche stellen. Koste ihn und sage, ob die Briten nicht Lob
verdienen, denn bei ihnen kennt jedes Kind den Negus, jeder Erwachsene
liebt ihn und jeder Trinker betet ihn an.

Wilhelm Stürmer: Cocktails by William. Page 75. Negus.
Wilhelm Stürmer: Cocktails by William. Page 75. Negus.

1949 Wilhelm Stürmer: Cocktails by William. Seite 76. Port Wine Negus.

Gieße 1 Liter Wein in einen irde-
nen Krug.-
Reibe die Schale einer Zitrone so
lange mit einigen Stücken Zucker
ab, bis alles Gelb der Schale vom
Zucker aufgenommen wurde.
Dann presse den Zitronensaft aus
und seihe ihn durch, reibe etwas
Muskatnuß hinzu und gieße alles
in den Wein. Sodann löse 1/4 Pfd.
Zucker in kochendem Wasser auf
und gib die siedende Zuckerlösung
in den Wein.
Laß nach gutem Umrühren das Ge ­-
tränk etwas ziehen; wenn es ab –
gekühlt ist, Ist es fertig zum Ge- ­
brauch.

1949 Wilhelm Stürmer: Cocktails by William. Seite 76. Soda Negus.

Etwa 1/4 Liter Portwein,
4 Stück Zucker,
3 Gewürznelken,
1 Messerspitze voll geriebener
Muskatnuß.
Gib dies alles in eine Pfanne und
erhitze es. (Nicht kochen). Gieße
die Flüssigkeit in ein irdenes Ge- ­
fäß und fülle mit etwa 1/4 Liter
Sodawasser auf. Nach einiger Ab- ­
kühlung serviere den Negus, wie
immer, ohne Eis.

1950 Ted Shane: Authentic and Hilarious Bar Guide. Seite 133. Negus.

The negus is a mull heated not by a poker, but by
adding boiling water to wine. It usually went (said
Queen Anne):
1 tbsp. sugar Juice of 2 lemons
Grated peel of 1 lemon All sorts of spices
. 1/5th boiling water
Warm wine, don’t boil. Pour into hot jug with the
works, let stand for quarter hour. Add boiling water,
stir, serve piping hot. Claret or Burgundy may be
boiled; Port, Sherry, or Madeira just heated.

1950 Ted Shane: Authentic and Hilarious Bar Guide. Seite 136. Port Wine Negus.

1 jigger Port Wine 1/2 tbsp. Powdered Sugar
Stir and fill one third with boiling water. Dust with
nutmeg.

1952 Anonymus: Cocktails. Seite 117. Port Wine negus.

Dans un petit tumbler chauffé:
Dissoudre dans un peu d’eau bouillante
un morceau de sucre et y ajouter un
verre de Porto rouge.
Remplir d’eau bouillante et servir avec de
la noix de muscade râpée.

1952 Charles: The Cocktail Bar. Seite 148. Port Wine Negus.

1 wine-glassful of port wine,
1 lemon,
Sugar to taste.
Put the wine in a long glass, and add the sugar and the
rind and juice of the lemon. Fill up with boiling water,
and strain.

1953 Anonymus: Esquire’s Handbook for Hosts. Seite 175. Negus – 1.

Pour a pint of port wine into a bowl
and add ten lumps of sugar that have
been rubbed on a lemon rind. Add the
juice of one lemon. A small pinch of
nutmeg. Now add a quart of boiling
water and serve while hot.

1953 Anonymus: Esquire’s Handbook for Hosts. Seite 175. Negus – 2.

(Stronger)
Pare off yellow rind of one lemon in
thin strips. Put into double boiler with
juice of same, two tablespoons of sugar,
and one bottle of port wine. Heat,
stirring until sugar is dissolved. When
hot, add one cup boiling water and
strain into preheated pitcher. Pour
into glasses or cups with or without a
flick of nutmeg.
Serves a dozen unless really thirsty.

1953 Leo Cotton: Old Mr. Boston Official Bartender’s Guide. Seite 117. Port Wine Negus.

1/2 Lump Sugar
2 oz. Port Wine
Fill Hot Whiskey Glass with hot
Water and stir. Grate Nutmeg on top.

1953 Jean Lupoiu: Cocktails. Seite 95. Porto Negus.

Mettez dans une petite casserole:
La moitié d’une cuillerée à café de sucre,
1 jet de Crème de Cassis, 1 verre de Porto
Constantino.
Chauffer sans le faire bouillir, verser
dans le gobelet en ajoutant une tranche de
citron transpercée de quatre clous de girofle.
girofle.
Servir.

1956 Patrick Gavin Duffy: The Official Mixer’s Manual. Seite 125. Negus.

Heat 1 bottle of Sherry or Port
and place in a pitcher. Rub a
little Lemon Rind on 6 cubes of
Sugar and add to the mixture.
Also add 2-3 large twists of Rind
and the Juice of 1 Lemon. Add
10 drops of Vanilla and 2 cups
of Boiling Water. Sweeten to
taste if necessary and strain into
glasses. Add a grating of Nutmeg
and serve. Makes 8 cups.

1957 Henri Barman: Cocktails et autres boissons mélangées. Seite 139. Negus.

Frotter quelques morceaux
de sucre sur l’écorce d’un
citron. Faire bouillir 2 1/2 dl.
d’eau et y faire fondre 125
gr. de sucre. Ajouter une
bouteille de porto, 4-5 clous
de girofle, un morceau de
cannelle, laisser infuser, sans
bouillir.
Passer dans des verres à grog
préchauffés et servir avec de
fines tranches de citron.

1957 Lawrence Blochman: Here’s How. Seite 131. Negus.

Dissolve 1 teaspoon sugar in a little hot water in a pre­-
heated old-fashioned glass. Add 4 ounces of port or
sherry, fill with very hot water. Dust with nutmeg and
add a twist of lemon peel if desired.
According to W. W. Chaplin, past president of OPC
and currently an NBC commentator, the term “Negus”
has nothing to do with Haile Selassie, whose tide is also
Negus. W. W. should certainly know, as he covered the
African campaign he described in his book, Diary of the
Ethiopian War. (He also covered World War II, from the
evacuation at Dunkirk to the Nazi surrender at Rheims.)
He says that the drink called Negus was named for a
Colonel Francis Negus who invented it during Queen
Ann’s reign in England (1702-14).

1960 Mapie de Toulouse-Lautrec & Robert J. Courtine: A boire, a boire. Seite 68. Négus.

POUR 8 PERSONNES: Dans une casserole assez grande, mettez le cidre,
1/2 L DE MADÈRE le madère, le poiré, le jus d’un demi-citron, le
1 L DE CIDRE sucre et la muscade. Mélangez et faites chauffer.
NON MOUSSEUX Lorsque le liquide arrive à ébullition, servez bien
1/2 L DE POIRÉ chaud avec des croûtes de pain grillées et bien
1 CITRON, MUSCADE chaudes.
50 G DE SUCRE

1963 Luigi Veronelli: I cocktails. Seite 329. Negus.

1/4 di litro di porto
il succo di due limoni spremuti dalla sola polpa
1 cucchiaino di zucchero
la scorza di un limone grattugiata senza nulla del
bianco interno
1 chiodo di garofano
In un casseruolino scaldare il porto, ma facendo attenzio­
ne che non bolla. A parte far bollire lo zucchero, il chiodo
di garofano, la scorza e il succo di limone in un quarto
di litro d’acqua. Mescolare bene l’acqua aromatizzata e
il vino e poi servire in tumblers da hot drink.
No, non crediate ne vada pazzo il… Negus. Invento la
miscela e le diede il nome, durante il regno della regina
Anna, un certo colonnello Francis Negus.

1965 Aladar von Wesendonk: 888 Cocktails. Seite 172. Negus.

1 Glas trockener Portwein
1 TL Zucker
1/2 Glas kochendes Wasser
1 Stück Zitronenschale
zusammen erhitzen
und in ein heißes Grogglas ge=
ben, mit Muskatnuß überstreuen
und mit Löffel servieren

1965 Anonymus: John de Kuyper’s Complete Guide to Cordials. Seite 31. Cinnamon Negus.

1/2 fifth De Kuyper Blackberry Liqueur
2 lemons, juice and peel
4 cloves
2-inch piece cinnamon stick
1 quart boiling water
Combine Liqueur and lemon in saucepan,
add spices tied in cheesecloth, heat. Keep
hot about 15 minutes. Do not boil. Remove
spices. Serve in mugs. Makes 8
comforting hot drinks.

1965 Harry Schraemli: Manual du bar. Seite 368. Brandy Negus.

Mettre dans une petite casserole 2 verres de cognac (100 g), 2 clous
de girofle, un petit morceau de cannelle d’environ 2 cm et on râpe
un soupçon de noix de muscade sur le tout. Faire arriver rapidement
à ébullition, passer dans un grand tumbler et finir de remplir avec
l’eau de Seltz.

1965 Harry Schraemli: Manual du bar. Seite 452. Portwine Negus.

Mettre dans une petite casserole 2 verres cognac ou eau de vie de
vin (100 g), 2 clous de girofle, 1 petit morceau de cannelle et râper
encore un soupçon de noix de muscade dessus. Amener le tout
brièvement à ébullition et le passer ensuite dans un verre à punch.
Finir de remplir à l’eau de Seltz.

1965 Harry Schraemli: Manual du bar. Seite 464. Sherry Negus.

Se prépare de la même façon que le Portwine Negus. Au lieu de
porto on prend du pale-sherry.

1965 Robert London & Anne London: Cocktails and Snacks. Seite 100. Hot Port Negus.

3 ounces port wine
1 teaspoon fine grain sugar
Boiling water
Dissolve sugar in 1 tablespoon hot water in a warm wine glass. Add
port and fill glass with boiling water. Sprinkle with nutmeg.
Note: Place a teaspoon in glass before pouring in hot liquid to prevent
glass from cracking.
Hot Sherry Negus: Substitute sherry for port.

1966 Herry Schraemli: Le roi du bat. Seite 53. Brandy Negus.

Petite casserole. 2 cognac, 2 clous de girofle,
petit morceau de cannelle. Muscader.
Faire arriver à ébullition, passer dans
un grand tumbler. Seltz.

1966 Herry Schraemli: Le roi du bat. Seite 141. Portwine Negus.

Petite casserole. 2 cognac (100 g), 2 clous
de girofle, 1 petit morceau de cannelle,
un soupçon de noix de muscade. Amener
le tout brièvement à ébullition. Verre à
punch. Remplir à l’eau de Seltz.

1966 Oscar Haimo: Cocktail and Wine Digest. Seite 81. Port Wine Negus Punch.

(Serves 8)
Pare off the Yellow Rind of one Lemon—with the juice of the
Lemon add 2 tsp. of Sugar and half bottle of Port Wine-
add 1 cup Boiling Water. Stir. Strain and serve in Mugs. Top
with Nutmeg.

1973 Oscar Haimo: Cocktail and Wine Digest. Seite 81. Port Wine Negus Punch.

(Serves 8)
Pare off the Yellow Rind of one Lemon—with the juice of the
Lemon add 2 tsp. of Sugar and half bottle of Port Wine-
add 1 cup Boiling Water. Stir. Strain and serve in Mugs. Top
with Nutmeg.

1976 Anonymus: International Guide to Drinks. Seite 79. Negus.

for 18 glasses
1 bottle sherry
1 quart boiling water
1 lemon
1 miniature bottle brandy
Nutmeg
Sugar
Warm the sherry in a saucepan
very slowly, slice the lemon and
add, then pour in boiling water.
Add a little grated nutmeg, sugar
to taste, then the brandy.

1977 Stan Jones: Jones’ Complete Barguide. Seite 370. Port Wine Negus.

Old Fashioned Glass Build
1/2 tsp sugar
2 oz port
Fill with hot water
Nutmeg

1977 Stan Jones: Jones’ Complete Barguide. Seite 460. Negus.

1 qt sherry or port
juice and twists of 1 lemon
6 cubes sugar
vanilla to taste
boiling water
nutmeg
Rub lemon over 6 sugar cubes and place in
saucepan with sherry or port along with
lemon twists. Heat. Add vanilla to taste and
2 cups boiling water. Strain into warmed
glasses and sprinkle with nutmeg.

explicit capitulum
*

About

Hi, I'm Armin and in my spare time I want to promote bar culture as a blogger, freelance journalist and Bildungstrinker (you want to know what the latter is? Then check out "About us"). My focus is on researching the history of mixed drinks. If I have ever left out a source you know of, and you think it should be considered, I look forward to hearing about it from you to learn something new. English is not my first language, but I hope that the translated texts are easy to understand. If there is any incomprehensibility, please let me know so that I can improve it.

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