Drinks

French 75

French 75 - Beitragsbild.
Cover picture: French 75. © Le Lion - Swetlana Holz.

We report on the origin of the French 75. Did it originate on the battlefields of the First World War? How can its name be explained? Are there historical predecessors? How is it served properly? And above all: what role do military traditions and the British headquarters, which was located in Cologne after the First World War, play in this?


40 ml gin
15 ml lemon juice
5 ml sugar syrup (2:1), , depending on the residual sweetness of the champagne
120 ml champagne

Preparation: Like a Collins; prepare in a highball glass. True to the original, however, serve in a silver goblet.

Der eponym

French 75.
French 75. [17]

The French 75 is said to have been named after the “Canon de 75 modèle 1897”, a light French field gun. It was mainly used in the First World War and revolutionised artillery. It was the first rapid-fire gun ever. With its invention, all other field guns became obsolete at a stroke. Other unofficial designations exist for it, including “French 75”. [16]

The origin of the French 75

Legend has it that English soldiers fighting in France during the First World War invented the drink called French 75. They would have mixed what was available, as there would be gin, lemon juice, sugar and champagne, and then served this mixture in an artillery shell with a 75 millimetre diameter. But this is certainly in the realm of legend – there are no reliable sources for this. [1]

Harry McElhone is said to have published a recipe for a mixed drink called French 75 in his book “The ABC of Mixing Drinks” published in 1919.[1]

We do not have this edition, so we have not been able to verify this. However, there is a reference to it from 1922. Harry McElhone states that this mixture was an invention of the bartender MacGarry from Buck’s Club in London, and Jeffrey Morgenthaler states that it is identical to a Tom Collins, only that the soda water has been replaced by champagne. We have justified doubts here, because in the fifth edition of the book we have from 1926, the recipe is something completely different, namely a combination of grenadine, absinthe, calvados and gin. In all other subsequent editions of Harry McElhone’s book, too, the recipe remains the same.

Somit ist klar, daß die Aussage, der French 75, so wie er heute verstanden wird, Thus it is clear that the statement that the French 75, as it is understood today, originated with Harry McElhone, as early as 1915, [10] cannot be true either.

A look into the historical recipes

What does a look into the recipes really reveal to us? There are different versions, all called French 75.

The French Seventyfive. The Washington Herald, 2. December 1915, page 10.
The French Seventyfive. The Washington Herald, 2. December 1915, page 10. [11]

In 1915, The Washington Herald published a recipe for a French Seventyfive: “There has been brought back to Broadway from the front by War Correspondent E. Alexander Powell the Soixante-Quince cocktail – the French Seventyfive. It is one-third gin, one-third grenadine, one-third applejack and a dash of lemon juice.” [11]

Soixante-quince. The Sphere, Paris in War Times, 1916.
Soixante-quince. The Sphere, Paris in War Times, 1916. [13]

In 1916, on 27 November, The Sphere, an illustrated magazine from London, takes up this recipe and writes in an article under the title “Paris In War Time”: “The only indication of levity which any restaurant manifests is a cocktail invented by a mixer of the American bar at Ciro’s called a “soixante-quinze,” an agreeable blend oc Calvados apple brandy and other mysterious ingredients.” [12] [13]

In 1922, we found the oldest recipe we have found in a bar book, published by Robert Vermeire. For the “75” cocktail, he combines two dashes of grenadine, a teaspoon of lemon juice, 1 part calvados and 2 parts gin. This must have been a popular drink because he states that this cocktail was very popular in France during the war, especially in Paris. He gives as the inventor of the drink a Henry from the famous Henry’s Bar in Paris. This is probably Henry Tépé from Henry’s Bar, not Harry McElhone from Harry’s New York Bar, as many think. Henry’s Bar was located at 11 rue Volney. [12] [14] [15] However, Harry McElhone additionally uses two dashes of absinthe, at least from 1926 onwards, and dispenses with lemon juice.

In 1927, Pedro Chicote published another variation. For him, a 75 cocktail consists of grenadine, lemon juice and gin, without soda water or champagne. Harry HcElhone’s recipe is called “72 cocktail”.

It was not until 1927 that the recipe for a “French 75” was published in Judge Jr’s “Here’s How”, as we still know it in principle today: “THIS drink is really what won the War for the Allies: 2 jiggers Gordon water; 1 part lemon juice; a spoonful of powdered sugar; cracked ice. Fill up the rest of a tall glass with champagne! [If you use club soda instead of champagne, you have a Tom Collins.]”

The question that arises from this is: Did the French 75 as we know it today really originate during the First World War, or did it come later? Older recipes for a French 75 are a completely different drink. This question can probably not be answered unequivocally today.

Historical antecedents

David Wondrich quotes from a newspaper article published in 1885, which states that Charles Dickens drank “Tom gin and champagne cups” with his guests at Parker House during his trip to Boston in 1867. For David Wondrich, this type of cup is equivalent to a French 75. He says: “A Champagne Cup is bubbly, sugar, citrus and ice. Add Tom gin, as that story seems to indicate, and you’ve got something perilously close to the French 75″. [2]

Based on this statement, we have searched the historical books for recipes for a Champagne Cup. Jerry Thomas knows it in 1862, [3] in 1863 it is included in “Cups And Their Customs”, [4] in 1869 in “Haney’s Steward & Barkeeper’s Manual”, [5] but they are all dissimilar to a Collins. A look at an English publication, “Cooling Cups and Dainty Drinks” also does not confirm David Wondrich’s statement. It lists 11 Champagne Cups, [6] but none are really similar to a French 75, nor is the one in “The Gentleman’s Table Guide” published in 1871. [7] The statement that Dickens’ “Tom gin and champagne cup” was already a French 75 is therefore a legend.

Gin Punch à la Gooch. William Terrington, 1869.
Gin Punch à la Gooch. William Terrington, 1869. [6-220]

Rather, it is as stated as early as 1927 in Judge Jr. and in many subsequent publications: The French 75 is a Collins in which the soda water is replaced by champagne. So if there is a historical predecessor, it can only be the Collins. The Collins developed from the Gin Punch. The Collins developed from the Gin Punch. The idea was to replace the still water of a Gin Punch with champagne. After the invention of the Collins, this idea has been varied, because there is not only the Collins as a champagne gin punch variant. The Garrick Club Punch, which predates the Collins, was made with lemon peel, lemon juice, sugar, maraschino, water and soda water and was effectively a Collins with added lemon zest and maraschino. William Terrington published the Gin Punch à la Gooch in 1869, which is in this tradition. It is made with genever and a little maraschino and diluted with soda water and champagne. [6-220] So if you absolutely have to find a link between the Gin Punch and the French 75, apart from the Collins, it is perhaps this Gin Punch à la Gooch, because it takes the idea on which the Garrick Club Punch was based, namely to use a fizzy water in the punch instead of still water, and uses a fizzy champagne instead of the fizzy water.

Sir Daniel Gooch, about 1866.
Sir Daniel Gooch, about 1866. [9]

Who Mr Gooch was can no longer be determined, we can only assume. Certainly we have to look in the English environment, and it should also be a well-known or important personality. Perhaps it was Sir Daniel Gooch, 1st Baronet, born in 1816 and deceased in 1889. He was Chairman of the Great Western Railway and a Member of the House of Commons from 1865 to 1885. He was given the hereditary title of Baronet in recognition of his services to overseas cable laying. [8]

David Wondrich reports that the combination of gin and champagne was generally popular in higher circles, because King George V was known to drink this mixture. [2]

A look at the more recent historical recipes tells us again that the French 75 was also prepared differently:

  • In 1933, in the book “Cocktail Parade”, a Soixante-Quince is a mixture of gin, lime juice, sugar and soda water, i.e. a Collins with lime instead of lemon.
  • In 1940, in the anonymously published “Professional Mixing Guide”, the hint to prepare a Collins-like French 75 with brandy appears for the first time.
  • In 1972, in the book “Recipes – Wines ans Spirits”, a French 75 is even prepared with egg white and cream.
French 75 - Variants.
French 75 – Variants.

For a better understanding, let’s take a look at the statistics for the recipes with gin, citrus and champagne, which account for around 80 percent of the recipes handed down from 1934 onwards.

Ice

French 75 - Ice.
French 75 – Ice.

Initially, French 75 was served with crushed ice, but during and after Prohibition this is only required in about half of the cases. Instead, either ice cubes were used or it was dispensed with altogether.

Jeffrey Morgenthaler, however, finds clear words:”I mean it: a French 75 is meant to be served on the rocks, just as a Collins would be. Which is far cry from the odd concoction being served without ice in Champagne flutes and being passed around on trays at wedding receptions these days. I never understood that drink, with its odd bit of floating lemon peel, and chances are, neither did you. But do me a favor and try it like this and I think you’re going to see what a refreshing, low-proof cocktail the French 75 is.[1]

The recipe

French 75 - Ingredients.
French 75 – Ingredients of the variant with gin, citrus and champagne.
French 75 - Garnish.
French 75 – Garnish.

There are many different ways of preparing it. Ours is not based on the 1927 recipe, but on the Garrick Club Punch and the Collins. We use relatively little gin and lemon juice, but all the more champagne. So it’s practically a Champagne Collins. Depending on the residual sweetness of the champagne, you may have to add a little sugar syrup to balance the acidity of the lemon. We do not add a garnish, because this is not part of a French 75. Rather, this is a custom that only emerged in the 1960s.

Our recipe is quite similar to the one from the Excelsior Hotel Ernst. This hotel seems to have been an important stopover for the French 75, which we will come back to. Their bar manager Matthias Allgeier wrote: “Your favoured mixture is very close to ours. 50 ml gin, 15 ml lemon, 10 ml sugar – plus a rather unknown 1er Cru Champagne (100ml), which does without the malolatic fermentation completely, which makes it very fresh & fruity – cherry a part.[18]

– „Deine favorisierte Mischung kommt ganz nah der Unseren. 50 ml Gin, 15 ml Zitrone, 10 ml Zucker – dazu ein eher unbekannter 1er Cru Champagner (100ml), welcher auf die malolatkische Gärung komplett verzichtet, was ihn sehr frisch & fruchtig macht – Kirsche a part.[18]

Jeffrey Morgenthaler, on the other hand, prepares his French 75 by shaking 30 ml gin, 30 ml lemon juice and 15 sugar syrup(2:1) on ice, then adding 60 ml champagne to the shaker and then pouring the mixture into a highball glass with ice cubes. [1]

For Jörg Meyer, the French 75 is something like a small Gin Sour. At Le Lion, they usually use 60 ml gin, 50 ml sweet & sour mix (i.e. around 30 ml lemon juice and 20 ml sugar syrup) and about 60 ml champagne. [19]

The silver goblet

At Le Lion, they also serve the French 75 in a silver goblet with ice cubes, just like a Prince of Wales. “The silver goblet at Le Lion is a tradition that dates back to the bar’s first year. In the first summer, Jörg Meyer was on his way to Café Paris across the street to get baguettes from there for the evening. A gentleman was standing in front of the café and Joerg Meyer asked him if he could help him. The gentleman wanted to eat something in the café, but there was no free place, whereupon Meyer said he should come over to his bar, he would take care of it and organise a salad for him. So Steffen Teske, that was the gentleman’s name, became a regular of the first hour. In the bar he asked if they knew the French 75, which he liked to drink and therefore wanted to order. His wish, however, was to have it served in a silver goblet, because he knew it that way from his hotel bar in Cologne, where it was always served that way. The guest’s wish was his command, and so Jörg Meyer prepared the French 75 in the desired manner without further ado. That evening, other guests became curious and asked what was in the silver goblet and ordered it as well. After two or three weeks, they realised that the French 75 served in the silver goblet was very well received, and they stuck with it ever since.[19] [20]

– „Der Silberbecher im Le Lion ist eine Tradition, die aus dem Anfangsjahr der Bar stammt. Im ersten Sommer war Jörg Meyer auf dem Weg ins gegenüberliegende Café Paris, um für den Abend Baguettes von dort zu holen. Vor dem Café stand ein Herr, und Joerg Meyer fragte ihn, ob er ihm helfen könne. Der Herr wollte im Café etwas essen, doch es war kein Platz frei, worauf Meyer meinte, er solle dann doch herüber in seine Bar kommen, er würde sich darum kümmern und für ihn einen Salat organisieren. So wurde Steffen Teske, so hieß de Herr, zum Stammgast der ersten Stunde. In der Bar erkundigte er sich, ob man denn den French 75 kenne, den trinke er nämlich gerne und wolle ihn deshalb bestellen. Sein Wunsch wäre aber, diesen im Silberbecher serviert zu bekommen, denn auf diese Art und Weise kenne er ihn aus seiner Hotelbar in Köln, wo er ihn immer so serviert bekäme. Der Wunsch des Gastes war Befehl, und so bereitete Jörg Meyer kurzerhand den French 75 in der gewünschten Art und Weise zu. An diesem Abend wurden andere Gäste neugierig und erkundigten sich, was das da im Silberbecher denn wäre, und bestellten diesen ebenfalls. Nach zwei bis drei Wochen stellte man fest, daß der French 75 im Silberbecher serviert sehr gut angenommen wurde, und seitdem blieb man dabei.[19] [20]

The hotel bar was the bar of the Excelsior Hotel Ernst. Their bar manager Matthias Allgeier reports: “In fact, we offer the French 75 in a silver goblet. The background for this are old hotel records that stated this. Since our house was used as headquarters by British troops until the end of 1926, I can imagine a connection here. Going further, the ‘serve’ may have been derived from the already famous Prince of Wales, who demanded a goblet and found his way here with the British troops.[18]

– „Tatsächlich bieten wir den French 75 in einem Silberbecher an. Hintergrund hierfür sind alte Hotel-Aufzeichnungen, die dieses angegeben haben. Da unser Haus bis Ende 1926 von britischen Truppen als Hauptquartier genutzt worden ist, kann ich mir hier eine Verbindung vorstellen. Weiter hergeholt könnte der ‘Serve’ vom bereits bekannten Prince of Wales abgeleitet worden sein, welcher ein Becher-Glas gefordert hat und mit den britischen Truppen den Weg hierher gefunden hat.[18]

The hotel was the headquarters of British troops from 6 December 1918 to 31 January 1926. [41]

Interestingly, the French 75 was also served in a silver cup in another bar in Cologne: the Shepheard. However, Frank Thelen, who worked there, could not say why this was so and what tradition was being followed. [21]

Initiation rites

Is there really a connection between the silver goblet and the original serving in the 75 mil artillery shell? Could the silver goblet be a reminiscence of this and have been publicised via the British headquarters in Cologne? Much speaks in favour of it, for similar military traditions still exist today.

Sascha Thieben thinks this derivation is credible, and he corroborates the assumption by reporting on a tradition in the German navy: “Those who fire the gun for the first time are given the shell filled with a cocktail by the older ARIS. Because of the residue in the shell, it doesn’t taste good, of course, and yes, you have to find your way to the railing very quickly. Accordingly, an area is left free so that the boys can go straight to the railing. I also know that certain colleagues keep this first sleeve (purely hypothetically) and shorten it so that they then make a drinking vessel out of it for home. I could well imagine that soldiers used to do something like this in the past. They simply sawed the 75mm shell smaller and made their drinking vessel out of it. There is a resemblance to the silver goblet in terms of shape.[22]

– „Diejenigen, die das erste Mal die Kanone abfeuern, bekommen von den älteren ARIS die Hülse gefüllt mit einem Cocktail. Durch die Rückstände in der Hülse schmeckt das natürlich nicht und ja, man muss sehr schnell den Weg zur Reling suchen. Dementsprechend läßt man auch einen Bereich frei, damit die Jungs dann auch gleich die Reling aufsuchen können. Ich weiß auch, daß gewisse Kollegen diese erste Hülse behalten (rein hypothetisch) und so kürzen, daß sie daraus dann ein Trinkgefäß für zu Hause machen. Ich könnte mir gut vorstellen, daß ähnliches früher auch die Soldaten gemacht haben. Also die 75er Hülse einfach kleiner gesägt und ihr Trinkgefäß daraus gemacht haben. Eine Ähnlichkeit zum Silberbecher von der Form ist durchaus gegeben.[22]

This tradition is not just one of naval artillery. Christian Brandl writes: “There is the tradition of having to drink from the first shell you pull off yourself. This exists in artillery as well as in armoury. But since there is less and less shell ammunition, the so-called ‘barrel beer’ has been used in the meantime, where a drink was tipped through the barrel of the gun after firing and the ‘newcomers’ then had to drink from the barrel at the other end. But there are various other traditions. I also know very well the peculiarity of converting the shot shells into something else. It’s quite possible that during the trench warfare in Verdun, for example, soldiers passed the time with such work and possibly made cups or something else out of them.[23]

– „Es gibt die Tradition aus der ersten selbst abgezogenen Hülse trinken zu müssen. Dieses gibt es bei der Artillerie, wie auch bei der Panzerei. Da es aber immer weniger Hülsenmunition gibt, wurde zwischenzeitlich eher auf das so genannte ‘Laufbier’ ausgewichen, bei dem ein Getränk nach dem Schießen durch den Lauf des Geschützes gekippt wurde und die ‘Neuen’ dann aus dem Rohr am anderen Ende trinken mussten. Da existieren aber noch diverse andere Traditionen. Die Eigenart, die abgeschossenen Hülsen zu etwas Anderem umzufunktionieren, kenne ich aber auch sehr gut. Es ist gut möglich, das in den Grabenkämpfen u. a. in Verdun Soldaten sich mit solchen Arbeiten die Zeit vertrieben haben und evtl. Becher oder sonst etwas daraus hergestellt haben.[23]

This is the German tradition. But how is it in the other countries? An enquiry with the Royal Naval Association yielded the answer: “I have been asking round about any such traditions in the Royal Navy or Royal marines. No one has come across this. It may indeed have been a legacy of the European wars from Napoleon’s time. Sorry I cant be of more help.[24]

That is why we are calling on all of you: Who knows of similar traditions, past or present? Please get in touch and let us know about it.

Military jargon

Let us conclude with an etymological consideration. What are we to make of the story that French 75 originated on the battlefields of Europe? There is evidence to support this derivation.

Saint Pinard.
Saint Pinard. [28]

When France entered the war in August 1914, its troops were initially only supplied with water. From September 1914, however, a daily ration of red wine began to be distributed. [25] This consisted of an inferior red wine with a low alcohol content, colloquially called “Pinard”. [25] [26] [27] It came from overproduction and the wine was patriotised. It was considered a tonic, a sacred product of the French soil, a symbol that distinguished French civilisation from Germanic barbarism. [25]

The distribution of wine to the soldiers was not previously provided for, neither in peacetime nor in wartime. At first, the daily ration was a quarter of a litre. In the course of the war, it was increased; from January 1918, there was even a daily three-quarter litre. [25]

A jargon arose to denote the rations: “A 75 is a cannon, a 105 is a chopine, a short 120 is a litre of pure wine, a long 120 is a litre of wet wine [probably meaning wine diluted with water here]. (and for our gunners, what it should be).[25] [29] [36]

– „un 75, c’est un canon; un 105, c’est une chopine; un 120 court, un litre de vin pur; un 120 long, un litre de vin mouillé. (et pour nos canonniers qu’est que cela devait être)[25] [29] [36]

What is this supposed to tell us? Is there a connection between the guns of the gunners and their drinks? We have found these ambiguities:

  • The “Canon de 75 modèle 1897″ was a light French field gun. [16]
  • A canon, cannon, is an old unit of measure for liquids and is equal to 1/16 of a litre. The cylindrical vessel for measuring liquids was a canon in the sense of a tube. The modern and popular meaning derives from it by metonymy, which is the interchange of the name, the substitution of one word for another. “Boire un canon de rouge”, “to drink a canon of red wine”, is to drink the dose of wine served in public houses. By synecdoche, which is the substitution of a word for a term from the same conceptual field, every dose of an alcoholic drink is a canon: “il boit des canons ni peu ni assez”, “he drinks canons neither too little nor too much”. [31] [32] [33]
  • A chopine is a beer glass as well as a measure of the capacity of liquids. The term has been documented since the 12th century and derives from the German word Schoppen, “brewer’s scoop”. In France, the chopine had a value of about 476.073 ml. [30]
  • The “Canon de 105 mle 1913 Schneider” was a medium long-range cannon used by the French artillery in the First and Second World Wars. [34]
  • The “Canon de 120 long modèle 1878″ was a gun of the French fortress artillery from the time before the First World War. [35]

Incidentally, alcohol was also served among the other belligerents. The Germans drank wine from looted Eastern French wine cellars, but there was also beer, German wine, brandy and schnapps. The daily schnapps ration was 125 ml. [37]

Rum and cannon shells with the British.
Rum and cannon shells with the British. Pozières, December 1916
© IWM (Q 4627) [42]

The British did not have wine like the French, but a daily rum ration. [38] Their soldiers received an ounce a day, less alcohol than the French and Germans, and less than British officers. This reflects a somewhat hypocritical treatment of the troops by the British leadership, which allowed officers to store their own alcohol in the trenches but not the soldiers. As with the French, drinking in the trenches was an issue for the experience of war. [39] Many colonels agreed that the recommended amount was too low and gave extra portions to nervous fighters to boost their confidence. Lt. Col. J.S.Y. Rogers, a medical officer of the 4th Black Watch, said in the inquest report on shell shock in 1922: “Had it not been for the rum ration I do not think we should have won the war. Before the men went over the top they had a good meal and a double ration of rum and coffee.” It was also known that British troops drank wine in preparation for battles in France, and beer was regularly drunk between conflicts. [40]

Etymological considerations

This is an extremely interesting context of ambiguities. Let us summarise: One drank one’s little glass, i.e. a canon, of gin, and also called it a “75”, which could also be understood to mean the field gun “canon de 75 modèle 1897”. If you then added champagne to give the whole thing a French feel, you got a “French 75”, which was also understood to mean the field gun. Moreover, would it not be conceivable that the British officers, if they had access to it, preferred champagne to simple wine, and then made a Collins out of it, with gin and champagne? Whether they even served this drink in a converted cannon shell remains to be seen. It could have been like that. But what can also be deduced from this is the question of authorship. British and French elements are mixed, and so the drink “French 75” will not be a purely British invention, but something in which both nations participated, the British and the French.

Sources
  1. https://www.jeffreymorgenthaler.com/french-75/ French 75. Von Jeffrey Morgenthaler, 25. January 2019.
  2. https://www.liquor.com/articles/behind-the-drink-the-french-75/#gs.us86zh Behind the Drink: The French 75. By David Wondrich, 9. July 2012.
  3. Jerry Thomas: The Bartenders‘ Guide. New York, Dick & Fitzgerald, 1862.
  4. George Edwin Roberts & Henry Porter: Cups And Their Customs. London, John Van Voorst, 1863.
  5. Anonymus: Haney’s Steward & Barkeeper’s Manual. New York, Jesse Haney & Co., 1869.
  6. William Terrington: Cooling Cups and Dainty Drinks. London & New York, George Routledge & Sons, 1869.
  7. E. Ricket & C. Thomas: The Gentleman’s Table Guide. London, H. Born, 1871.
  8. https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Daniel_Gooch Daniel Gooch.
  9. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Daniel_Gooch_by_Thomas_Dewell_Scott_(Illustrated_London_News,_1866-12-08).jpg Portrait of Daniel Gooch (1816–1889).
  10. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/French_75_(cocktail) French 75 (cocktail).
  11. https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045433/1915-12-02/ed-1/seq-10/#date1=1910&index=0&date2=1918&searchType=advanced&language=&sequence=0&lccn=sn83045433&words=gin+one+one-third+third&proxdistance=5&state=&rows=20&ortext=&proxtext=one+third+gin&phrasetext=&andtext=&dateFilterType=yearRange&page=1 The Washington Herald, 2. December 1915, Seite 10.
  12. https://www.diffordsguide.com/encyclopedia/1267/cocktails/french-75-cocktail-recipes-and-history French 75 cocktail – recipes & history.
  13. http://everythinginthebar.blogspot.com/2017/05/french-75-cocktail-soixante-quinze-75.html French 75 Cocktail – Soixante-Quinze “75”. Lucio Tucci, 16. May 2017.
  14. https://www.thedailybeast.com/the-long-tradition-of-americans-drinking-in-paris The Long Tradition of American Drinking in Paris. David Wondrich, 24. November 2018.
  15. https://books.google.de/books?id=0KkeAwAAQBAJ&pg=PP43&lpg=PP43&dq=%22henry%27s+Bar%22+Paris&source=bl&ots=bCie3nas2M&sig=ACfU3U2qL-dSuD2W9uLATnPV1YmIDKdJFg&hl=de&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwjf4on0wbPnAhWRwAIHHTfqAJ8Q6AEwAXoECBUQAQ#v=onepage&q=%22henry’s%20Bar%22%20Paris&f=false vielleicht auch https://books.google.de/books?id=6_tRDwAAQBAJ&pg=PA212&lpg=PA212&dq=%22henry%27s+Bar%22+Paris&source=bl&ots=2QAFn6ZbB3&sig=ACfU3U0izI8AKC5LKgWPr8WArB0swkYoaA&hl=de&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwjf4on0wbPnAhWRwAIHHTfqAJ8Q6AEwAnoECBMQAQ#v=onepage&q=%22henry’s%20Bar%22%20Paris&f=false Arlen J. Hansen: Expatriate Paris. A Cultural and Literary Guide to Paris of the 1920s. ISBN 978-1-61145-699-8. Arcade Publishing, 2012.
  16. https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canon_de_75_mm_mod%C3%A8le_1897 Canon de 75 mm modèle 1897.
  17. https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Datei:0_Canon_de_75_mm_mod%C3%A8le_1897_-_Mus%C3%A9e_de_l%27arm%C3%A9e_%C3%A0_Paris_2.JPG 75 mm rapid fire cannon model 1897.
  18. Email from Matthias Allgaier, Excelsior-Hotel Ernst, dated 9 March 2020.
  19. Telephone conversation with Swetlana Holz on 5. March 2020.
  20. https://mixology.eu/wahre-geschichte-french-75-cocktail-collins-serie/ Der Collins & seine Anverwandten, Teil 11 – Der French 75. Armin Ziummermann, 10. November 2020.
  21. Telephone conversation with Frank Thelen on 17. June 2021
  22. Shared by Sascha Thieben via facebook on 15. November 2021
  23. Shared by Christian Brandl via email on 25. November 2020
  24. Communicated by Nigel Huxtable, Membership Services Manager at the Royal Naval Association, following an enquiry on 25. June 2021
  25. https://www.thedrinksbusiness.com/2014/11/top-five-world-war-one-drinks/2/ Top five World War One drinks. Neal Baker, 10. November 2014.
  26. https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pinard Pinard.
  27. https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pinard_(vin) Pinard (vin).
  28. https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Saint_Pinard.jpg?uselang=fr Prière des poilus à saint Pinard.
  29. https://www.saint-pons-la-calm.fr/cave_coop/Histoire_de_la_vigne.htm Le “Père Pinard” était sur le front.
  30. https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chopine Chopine.
  31. https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canon Canon.
  32. https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Metonymie Metonymie.
  33. https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Synekdoche Synekdoche.
  34. https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canon_de_105_mle_1913_Schneider Canon de 105 mle 1913 Schneider.
  35. https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canon_de_120_mm_L_mod%C3%A8le_1878 Canon de 120 mm L modèle 1878.
  36. https://www.anciens-cols-bleus.net/t6423p360-les-b-a-n-diego-suarez-andrakaka Comment from 29. July 2010.
  37. https://www.thedrinksbusiness.com/2014/11/top-five-world-war-one-drinks/3/ Top five World War One drinks. Neal Baker, 10. November 2014.
  38. https://pointsadhs.com/2014/05/29/world-war-i-part-2-the-british-rum-ration/ World War I, Part 2: The British Rum Ration. Nicholas K. Johnson, 29. May 2014.
  39. https://warontherocks.com/2015/05/a-farewell-to-sobriety-drinking-during-the-great-war/ A Farewell to Sobriety: Drinking During the Great War. Jake Hall, 5. May 2015.
  40. https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2019/06/28/british-army-officers-wrongly-believed-alcohol-made-ww1-troops/ British army officers wrongly believed alcohol made WW1 troops better fighters, claims addiction specialist. Yohannes Lowe, 28. June 2019.
  41. https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Excelsior_Hotel_Ernst Excelsior Hotel Ernst.
  42. https://i1.wp.com/pointshistory.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/05/rum-and-shells.jpg?resize=750%2C604&ssl=1 British soldier sifting through rum jars and shell cases. Pozières, December 1916. © IWM (Q 4627).

Historical Recipes

1915 https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045433/1915-12-02/ed-1/seq-10/#date1=1910&index=0&date2=1918&searchType=advanced&language=&sequence=0&lccn=sn83045433&words=gin+one+one-third+third&proxdistance=5&state=&rows=20&ortext=&proxtext=one+third+gin&phrasetext=&andtext=&dateFilterType=yearRange&page=1 The Washington Herald, 2. Dezember 1915, Seite 10. French Seventy-Five.

There has been brought back to Broad-
way from the front by War Correspon-
dent E. Alexander Powell the Soixante-
Quinze cocktail – the French Seventy-
five. It is one third gin, one third gren-
adine, one third applejack and a dash of
lemon juice. Frank Leon Smith, the
story writer, says he drank one and im-
mediately paid his rent.

1922 Robert Vermeire: Cocktails. Seite 44. “75” Cocktail.

Fill the shaker half full of broken ice and
add:
2 dashes of Grenadine.
1 teaspoonful of Lemon Juice.
1/6 gill of Calvados.
1/6 gill of Dry Gin.
Shake well and strain into a cocktail-glass.
This cocktail was very well appreciated in
Paris during the war. It has been called
after the famous light French field gun, and
was introduced by Henry of Henry’s bar
fame in Paris.

1924 Carlo Beltramo: Carlo’s Cocktails. Seite 40. Soixante quinze «75» cocktail.

Se prépare dans le shaker à moitié rempli
de glace en morceaux: Quelques gouttes de
grenadine, assez pour bien donner la couleur,
le jus d’un petit demi-citron. 1/3 dl. de Cal-
vados, 2/3 de Gordon Gin. — Le «75» cock-
tail est très populaire en France et le Jus sur-
tout à Paris, pendant la guerre.

1926 Harry McElhone: Harry’s ABC of Mixing Cocktails. Seite 81. “75” Cocktail.

1 teaspoonful Grenadine, 2 dashes of Absinthe
or Anis-del-Oso, 2/3 Calvados, 1/3 Gin.
Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.
(This cocktail was very popular in France during
the war, and named after the French light field
gun.)

1927 Judge Jr.: Here’s How. Seite 28. The French “75”.

THIS drink is really what won
the War for the Allies:
2 jiggers Gordon water;
1 part lemon juice;
a spoonful of powdered sugar;
cracked ice.
Fill up the rest of a tall glass with
champagne!
[If you use club soda instead of
champagne, you have a Tom Col-
lins.]

1927 Pedro Chicote: El bar americano. Seite 71. 75-Cocktail.

Prepárese en cocktelera:
4 ó 5 pedacitos de hielo.
8 gotas de granadina.
1 cucharada de las de café de jugo de limón y el
resto hasta llenar la copa de dry gin.
Agítese muy bien y sírvase en copa de cocktail.

1927 Piero Grandi: Cocktails. Seite 50. “72” Cocktail.

Une cuillerée à thé de Grenadine, 2 gouttes
d’Absinthe, ou Anis-del-Oso, 2/3 Calvados, 1/3
Gin. Mélangez bien et versez dans un verre à
Cocktail. (Ce Cocktail était très populaire en
France pendant la guerre, et, était appelé par
les Français «Léger canon des champs»).

1928 Judge Jr.: Here’s How. Seite 36. The French “75”.

THIS drink is really what won
the War for the Allies:
2 jiggers Gordon water;
1 part lemon juice;
a spoonful of powdered sugar;
cracked ice.
Fill up the rest of a tall glass with
champagne!
[If you use club soda instead of
champagne, you have a Tom Col-
lins.]

1928 Pedro Chicote: Cocktails. Seite 221. 75=Cocktail.

Prepárese en cocktelera:
4 ó 5 pedacitos de hielo.
8 gotas de granadina.
1 cucharada de las de café de jugo de limón y el
resto hasta llenar la copa de dry gin.
Agítese muy bien y sírvase en copa de cocktail.

1930 Harry Craddock: The Savoy Cocktail Book. The French “75” Cocktail.

2/3 Gin. 1/3 Lemon Juice.
1 Spoonful Powdered Sugar.
Pour into tall glass containing
cracked Ice and fill up with
Champagne.
Hits with remarkable precision.

1930 Harry McElhone: Harry’s ABC of Mixing Cocktails. Seite 75. “75” Cocktail.

1 teaspoonful Grenadine, 2 dashes of Absinthe or
Anis del Oso, 2/3 Calvados, 1/3 Gin.
Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.
(This cocktail was very popular in France during
the war, and named after the French light field
gun.)

1930 Miguel R. Reguera: Cocktails. Seite 55. 75 Cocktail.

En una cocktelera, con hielo picado:
Unas gotas de granadina
El zumo de medio limón
Una copita de ginebra
. » de Calvados.
Agítese y sírvase con corteza de limón.

1930 Pedro Chicote: Le ley mojada. Seite 236. 75-Cocktail.

Prepárese en cocktelera:
3 ó 4 pedacitos de hielo.
8 gotas de granadina.
1 cucharada de las de café de jugo de limón, y el
resto hasta llenar la copa, de dry gin.
Agítese muy bien y sírvase en copa de cocktail.

1930 William T. Boothby – „Cocktail Bill“ Boothby’s World Drinks. Seite 41. French ’75.

Gin . . . . . . . . . . . . 1/2 jigger Calvados . . . . . . . . 1/4 jigger
Grenadine . . . . . . 2 dashes Lemon . . . . . . . . . . 1 spoon
Shake well with ice, strain into chilled cocktail glass and serve.

1933 Anonymus: Bottoms Up! Y Como! French “75”.

1. Two thirds Gin.*
2. One third Lemon Juice.
3. One spoon powdered sugar.
Tall glass. Cracked ice.
Fill with champagne.

1933 Anonymus: Cocktail Parade. Seite 10. Soixante-Quinze.

1 portion Gin
1/2 portion fresh Lime juice
1 tablespoon powdered sugar
Filter thru shaved ice in tall glass, fill
with seltzer water.
Cool in summer.

Anonymus: Cocktail Parade. Page 10. Soixante-Quinze.
Anonymus: Cocktail Parade. Page 10. Soixante-Quinze.

1933 Anonymus: Hollywood’s Favorite Cocktail Book. Seite 19. The French “75” Cocktail.

2/3 Gin
1/3 Lemon Juice
1 Spoonful Powdered Sugar
Pour into tall glass containing
cracked ice and fill up with
Champagne.

1933 Harry Craddock: The Savoy Cocktail Book. Seite 73. The French “75” Cocktail.

2/3 Gin. 1/3 Lemon Juice.
1 Spoonful Powdered Sugar.
Pour into tall glass containing
cracked Ice and fill up with
Champagne.
Hits with remarkable precision.

1934 Anonymus: Angostura Recipes. Seite 26. French “75”.

as mixed by CONSTANT RENAUD of
The S.S. ILE DE FRANCE
Use Tom Collins Glass
Splash of Gum Syrup or Teaspoon Sugar
2 Teaspoons Lemon Juice
Jiggers of Gin. 2 Cubes Ice
Fill glass with Dry Champagne

1934 G. F. Steele: My New Cocktail Book. Seite 51. French 75.

2/3 Dry Gin
1/3 Lemon juice
Gum syrup to taste
Fill up rest of a tall glass with Champagne! If you use
club soda instead of Champagne, you have a TOM
COLLINS!

1934 Harry McElhone: Harry’s ABC of Mixing Cocktails. Seite 89. “75” Cocktail.

1 teaspoonful Grenadine, 2 dashes of Absinthe
or Anis del Oso, 2/3 Calvados, 1/3 Gin.
Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.
(This cocktail was very popular in France during
the war, and named after the French light field
gun.)

1934 Irvin S. Cobb: Irvin S. Cobb’s Own Recipe Book. Seite 41. French 75.

2/3 Paul Jones Four Star Gin, 1/3 Lemon Juice, 1 teaspoonful
Powdered Sugar. Pour into champagne glass containing cracked ice and fill with Champagne. I had my first of these in a dugout in the Argonne. I
couldn’t tell whether a shell or the drink hit me.

1934 Patrick Gavin Duffy: The Official Mixer’s Manual [collectic1806]. Seite 30. French “75” Cocktail.

2/3 Gin
1/3 Lemon Juice
1 Teaspoonful Powdered Sugar
Pour into tall glass containing cracked ice
and fill up with champagne.
Use glass number 10

1934 William T. Boothby: „Cocktail Bill“ Boothby’s World Drinks. Seite 40. French ’75.

Gin . . . . . . . . . . . 1/2 jigger Calvados . . . . . . . . 1/4 jigger
Grenadine . . . . . 1 spoon Lemon . . . . . . . . . . 1 spoon
Shake well with ice, strain into chilled cocktail glass and serve.

1935 Anonymus: Fancy Drinks. Seite 16. French “75”.

Use Tom Collins glass
Splash of Gum Syrup or teaspoon Sugar
2 teaspoons Lemon Juice
1 1/2 jiggers of Gin
2 cubes Ice
Fill glass with Dry Champagne

1935 Gustav Selmer Fougner: Along the Wine Trail. Seite 188. French “75” Cocktail.

Two parts Gin
One part lemon juice
One spoonful powdered sugar
Pour into goblet containing cracked ice and fill up with Champagne.

1935 Leo Cotton: Old Mr. Boston. Seite 54. French “75” Cocktail.

2/3 Old Mr. Boston Dry Gin
1/3 Lemon Juice
1 Teaspoonful Powdered Sugar
Pour into Tom Collins glass con­
taining cracked ice and fill up with
Champagne.

1935 O. Blunier: The Barkeeper’s Golden Book. Seite 160. French 75.

1/3 Lemon Juice
2/3 Gin
1 Barspoon Sugar
Cracked Ice in glass
balance Champagne

1937 John R. Iverson: Liquid Gems. Seite 50. French 75.

Shaker — ice
1 oz. Gin
1/4 oz. lemon juice
1/4 oz. simple syrup
Shake and strain in hollow stem
glass, fill to top with Cham-
pagne and serve.
No decoration.

Observations
This is a famous cocktail, and is considered a
drink for the connoisseur. See Champagne Cock-
tail.

1938 Anonymus: The Merry Mixer. French “75”.

Juice of 1/2 Lemon
1 teaspoon Sugar
1 jigger Schenley’s Silver Wedding Gin
Shake well with cracked ice, pour contents into goblet
— fill up with Champagne.

1938 Bud Caroll: Popular Drinks of Today. Seite 32. French 75.

Dry Gin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 jigger Sugar . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 spoon
Lime . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . juice of 1 Champagne . . . . . . . . 1 split
Use 12 ounce glass. First lime, 2 cubes of ice, gin,
sugar. Fill with champagne. Stir well; serve with
cucumber rind.

1938 Hyman Gale & Gerald F. Marco: The How and When. Seite 114. French “75” Cocktail.

2/3 Dry Gin
Juice of 1/4 Lemon
1 spoon Powdered Sugar
Pour into Tall Glass
Full of cracked ice
Fill with Champagne

1940 Anonymus: Professional Mixing Guide. Seite 32. French ’75.

Juice 1 Lemon, 1 teaspoonful fine
granulated Suger, 2 oz Dry Gin, 5
generous dashes Angostura Bitters.
Shaked with cubed or cracked ice and
pour into an 8 oz highball glass. Fill
with Champagne, and stir slightly.
(Brandy is sometimes used instead of
the Collins mix indicated above.)

1940 Anonymus: Recipes. Seite 58. French 75.

Use mixing glass 1/2 shaved ice
Juice 1/2 Lemon
1 barspoon Sugar
1 jigger Gin
Shake well. Strain into Collins glass with
2 cubes ice. Add Champagne wid serve.

1943 Oscar Haimo: Cocktail Digest. Seite 40. French 75.

2 oz. Gin
1 tsp. Powdered Sugar
Juice of Half Lemon
Cracked Ice
Fill with champagne
Serve in tall glass.

1940 Patrick Gavin Duffy: The Official Mixer’s Guide. Seite 30. French “75” Cocktail.

2/3 Gin
1/3 Lemon Juice
1 Teaspoonful Powdered Sugar
Pour into tall glass containing cracked ice
and fill up with champagne.
Use glass number 10

1940 Pedro Talavera: Los secretos del cocktail. Seite 229. 75 cocktail.

Prepárese en un gran vaso de cristal:
10 gotas de Granadina.
6 ídem de Absenta.
1/3 copa de captain’s Gin.
1/3 ídem de Coñac Martell.
Agítese bien y se pasa a la copa núm. 5.

1944 Crosby Gaige: The Standard Cocktail Guide. Seite 33. French ’75.

Juice of 1 Lemon
1 teaspoon Fine Granulated Sugar
2 ounces Dry Gin
5 dashes Angostura Bitters
Shake with cracked ice and pour into Highball
glass. Fill with Champagne.

1944 Oscar Haimo: Cocktail Digest. Seite 54. “French 75”.

Juice of 1⁄2 Florida Seedless Lime
1 tsp. Sugar
2 oz. Gin
Cracked Ice
Fill with chilled champagne
Serve in tall glass.

1946 Bill Kelly: The Roving Bartender. Seite 32. French 75.

Dash Angostura Bitters
1/2 lemon juice
1/2 spoon sugar
1 oz. gin
Shake. Strain into 8 oz. glass.
Fill with champagne.

1946 Lucius Bebe: The Stork Club Bar Book. Seite 45. French 75.

2 oz. gin
1 tsp. powdered sugar
juice of half lemon
cracked ice
Top with champagne and serve in tall glass.

1946 Oscar Haimo: Cocktail and Wine Digest. Seite 60. “French 75”.

Juice of 1/2 Lemon
1 tsp. Sugar
2 oz. Gin
Cracked Ice. Fill With Chilled Cham­-
pagne. Serve in tall glass.
Stir.

1948 David A. Embury: The Fine Art of Mixing Drinks. Seite 310. French 75.

Juice of 1 Lime or 1/2 Lemon
2 teaspoonfuls Sugar Syrup
2 ounces Cognac
Shake with crushed ice, pour into Collins glass, ice
and all, and fill up with champagne.
Gin is sometimes used in place of cognac in this
drink, but then, of course, it no longer should be called
French.

1948 Trader Vic: Bartender’s Guide. Seite 333. French “75”.

1 oz. dry gin 1/2 tsp. powdered sugar
Juice1/4 lemon Champagne to fill
Shake with cracked ice; pour into highball glass filled with
cracked ice; fill with chilled champagne.

1949 Anonymus: Professional Mixing Guide. Seite 34. French ’75.

5 generous dashes ANGOSTURA
aromatic bitters, juice 1 Lemon, 1
teaspoonful fine granulated Sugar,
2 oz. Dry Gin. Shake with cubed
or cracked ice and pour into an 8
oz. highball glass. Fill with Cham-
pagne and stir slightly. (Brandy
may be used instead of Gin).

1949 Emile Bauwens: Livre de Cocktails. Seite 44. French 75 cocktail.

1 Cuiller Sucre en Poudre –
Jus 1/2 Citron –
1 Verre Old Tom Gordon’s Gin –
Frapper au shaker et passer dans un
tumbler moyen; avant de servir,
remplir de Champagne.

1949 Wilhelm Stürmer: Cocktails by William. Seite 52. French 75 Cocktail.

Gib in eine Sektschwenkschale ein
Gläschen guten Cognac und fülle
mit gut gekühltem Sekt auf.
Der fertige French 75 garniert sich
nett mit einer Kirsche.
Zum letzten Schliff träufelst Du
etwas Zitronenöl auf.

1950 Ted Shane: Authentic and Hilarious Bar Guide. Seite 56. French “75”.

1 part Lemon Juice
1 tsp. Powdered Sugar
2 parts Gin
Pour into tall glass containing cracked
ice and fill up with Champagne.

Ted Shane: Authentic and Hilarious Bar Guide. Page 56. French 75.
Ted Shane: Authentic and Hilarious Bar Guide. Page 56. French 75.

1951 Anonymus: The Holiday Drink Book. Seite 22. French ’75.

Juice 1 lemon
1 teaspoon sugar
2 oz. dry gin
Chilled Champagne
Shake ail but Champagne with cracked
ice and pour into highball glass. Fill with
Champagne, and stir slightly. (Brandy
may be used instead of gin.)

1951 Ted Saucier: Ted Saucier’s Bottoms Up. Seite 102. French “75”.

1 jigger gin
Juice 1/2 lemon
1 teaspoon sugar
Mix and pour into 14-oz. highball glass, 1/3 full of
shaved ice. Fill remainder of glass with cham-
pagne.

1953 Anonymus: Esquire’s Handbook for Hosts. Seite 158. French “75”.

2 ounces of gin
1 teaspoon powdered sugar
Juice of one fresh lime or one-
fourth lemon
Shake well with ice. Pour into ten-
ounce glass, and then fill with cham­-
pagne. Some add 5 dashes of bitters.

1953 Anonymus: Esquire’s Handbook for Hosts. Seite 161. French “75” or King’s PEG.

Juice of one lemon
1 teaspoon fine granulated sugar
2 oz. brandy
5 dashes bitters
Shake with cracked ice and pour un­-
strained into highball glass. Fill with
champagne and stir gently.

1953 Anonymus: The U.K.B.G. Guide to Drinks. Seite 100. “French 75”.

Serve in tall glass.
Juice of 1/2 Lemon.
teaspoonful of Sugar.
2 oz. Gin.
Cracked Ice.
Fill with Champagne.

1953 Anonymus: The U.K.B.G. Guide to Drinks. Seite 120. Diamond Fizz (Sometimes called ‘French 75’.

Same as Gin Fizz.
Fill with Champagne.
teaspoonful of Sugar.
Add 1 cube of Ice.

Seite 119. Gin Fizz.

Same as Brandy.
Except use Gin.

Seite 119 Brandy Fizz.

Juice of 1 Lemon.
1 teaspoon Sugar.
1 1/2 oz. Brandy.
Shake and Strain.
Serve in Highball Glass with
1 cube of Ice.
Fill with Syphon Soda.

1953 David A. Embury: The Fine Art of Mixing Drinks. Seite 310. French 75.

Juice of 1 Lime or 1/2 Lemon
2 teaspoonfuls Sugar Syrup
2 ounces Cognac
Shake with crushed ice, pour into Collins glass, ice and all, and fill up
with champagne.
Gin is sometimes used in place of cognac in this drink, but then, of
course, it no longershould be called French.

1953 „Kappa“: Bartender’s Guide to Mixed Drinks. Seite 49. French “75” Cocktail.

1 oz. Lemon Juice
1 Teaspoon Powdered Sugar
2 oz. Gin
Pour in tall glass containing cracked Ice and
fill up with Champagne.

1953 Leo Cotton: Old Mr. Boston Official Bartender’s Guide. Seite 68. French “75”.

Juice of 1 Lemon
2 Teaspoons Powdered Sugar
1 Cube of Ice
Stir well in 12 oz. Tom Collins glass.
Then add 2 oz. Old Mr. Boston Dry
Gin and fill with Champagne. Decorate
with slice of Lemon, Orange and a
Cherry. Serve with straws.

1953 S. S. Field: The American Drinking Book. Seite 216. French 75.

Juice of 1/2 lemon, 1/2 teaspoon powdered sugar, 2
ounces of dry Gin. Shake well with cracked ice and strain into saucer
Champagne glass containing 1 ice cube. Fill with Champagne.
Delightful but dangerous.

1954 Eddie Clark: King Cocktail. Seite 24. French 75.

(Paris)
Use a large goblet glass. Put in several
pieces of cracked ice and add:
1 measure Dry Gin
Juice of 1/2 Lemon
1 spoonful Powdered Sugar
Fill glass with Champagne.

1954 Robert H. Loeb, Jr.: Nip Ahoy. Seite 30. French ’75.

Robert H. Loeb, Jr.: Nip Ahoy. Page 30. French '75.
Robert H. Loeb, Jr.: Nip Ahoy. Page 30. French ’75.

1955 Anonymus: The U.K.B.G. Guide to Drinks. Seite 100. “French 75”.

Serve in tall glass.
Juice of 1/2 Lemon.
teaspoonful of Sugar.
2 oz. Gin.
Cracked Ice.
Fill with Champagne.

1955 Anonymus: The U.K.B.G. Guide to Drinks. Seite 120. Diamond Fizz (Sometimes called ‘French 75’.

Same as Gin Fizz.
Fill with Champagne.
teaspoonful of Sugar.
Add 1 cube of Ice.

Seite 119. Gin Fizz.

Same as Brandy.
Except use Gin.

Seite 119 Brandy Fizz.

Juice of 1 Lemon.
1 teaspoon Sugar.
1 1/2 oz. Brandy.
Shake and Strain.
Serve in Highball Glass with
1 cube of Ice.
Fill with Syphon Soda.

1956 Patrick Gavin Duffy: The Official Mixer’s Manual. Seite 3. French “75”.

1 Jigger Dry Gin
1/3 Jigger Lemon Juice
1 Teaspoon Powdered Sugar
Pour into tall glass 1/2 full of
cracked ice, and fill with chilled
Champagne.

1957 Lawrence Blochman: Here’s How. Seite 85. French 75.

1 teaspoon sugar 1 tablespoon lemon juice
1 jigger dry gin Champagne
Fill a 12-ounce glass 1/3 full of cracked ice. Add the
sugar, lemon juice and gin in that order. Muddle well,
fill with chilled French champagne.

1960 Anonymus: The U.K.B.G. Guide to Drinks. Seite 99. “French 75”.

Serve in tall glass.
Juice of 1/2 Lemon.
1 teaspoonful of Sugar.
2 oz. Gin.
Cracked Ice.
Fill with Champagne.

1961 Anonymus: Cocktaily y bocaditos. Seite 63. Frances 75.

(Para 2 porciones)
Jugo de 1 lima o de 1/2 limón – Almíbar, 2 cucharaditas –
Cognac, 60 gramos – Champagne, cantidad necesaria – Hielo gra-
nizado, cantidad necesario.
• Poner hasta la mitad de la coctelera hielo
granizado.
• Verter los ingredientes; agitar bien.
• Servir sin colar, en vasos altos de 120 gra-
mos y completar con el champagne bien he-
lado.

1963 Eddie Clarke: Shaking in the 60’s. Seite 82. French 75 (Paris).

Use a large goblet glass. Put in several pieces of
cracked ice and add:
1 measure gin
juice of 1/2 lemon
1 spoonful powdered sugar
Fill glass with champagne.

Eddie Clarke: Shaking in the 60’s. Page 82. French 75.
Eddie Clarke: Shaking in the 60’s. Page 82. French 75.

1964 Anonymus: Peter Pauper’s Drink Book. Seite 45. French ’75.

1 ounce Lemon Juice 2 ounces Brandy
1 teaspoon Sugar Syrup Chilled Champagne
Shake all but champagne with cracked ice
and pour, with ice, into highball glass. Fill
with champagne, and stir slightly. Gin may
be used instead of brandy.

1965 Aladar von Wesendonk: 888 Cocktails. Seite 106. French „75“.

1/3 Zitronensaft
1/3 Curacao weiß
1/3 Gordon’s Gin
im shaker mit Eis schütteln, in
Sektschale seihen, mit kaltem
Sekt auffüllen und mit einer Kir=
sche garnieren

1965 Anonymus: The U.K.B.G. Guide to Drinks. Seite 101. “French 75”.

Serve in tall glass.
Juice of 1/2 Lemon.
1 teaspoonful of Sugar.
2 ozs. Gin.
Cracked Ice.
Fill with Champagne.

1965 Anonymus: The U.K.B.G. Guide to Drinks. Seite 116. Diamond Fizz (Sometimes called ‘French 75’.

Same as Gin Fizz.
Fill with Champagne.
teaspoonful of Sugar.
Add 1 cube of Ice.

Seite 116. Gin Fizz.

Same as Brandy.
Except use Gin.

Seite 115 Brandy Fizz.

Juice of 1 Lemon.
1 teaspoon Sugar.
1 1/2 oz. Brandy. * * *
Shake and Strain.
Serve in Highball glass with
1 cube of Ice.
Fill with Syphon Soda.

1965 Robert London & Anne London: Cocktails and Snacks. Seite 85. French “75”.

2 ounces dry gin or brandy 1 teaspoon fine grain sugar
Juice of 1 lemon
Shake well with cracked ice. Pour into an 8-ounce highball glass. Fill
with chilled champagne. Stir very slightly.

1966 John Doxat: Booth’s Handbook of Cocktails and Mixed Drinks. Seite 129. ’75.

2 oz. Dry Gin
Juice of 1 Lemon
Teaspoon Powdered Sugar
2 dashes Angostura
Shake, strain into tall stemmed glass. Top with chilled
non-vintage Champagne.

1966 Oscar Haimo: Cocktail and Wine Digest. Seite 60. “French 75”.

Juice of 1/2 Lemon. 1 tsp. Sugar, 2 oz. Gin
Serve in tall glass with Cracked Ice.
Fill with Chilled Champagne. Stir.

1968 Anonymus: The Dieter’s Drink Book. Seite 32. French 75.

1 1/2 oz. gin, 80 proof
4 oz. brut champagne
1 tbs. lemon juice
1/2 tsp. powdered sugar
Shake gin, lemon and sugar vigorously with
cracked ice. Strain into highball glass with ice
cubes. Add chilled champagne. Stir gently.
Serve with lemon twist and maraschino cherry.

1971 Anonymus: Tropical Recipes. Standard Recipes. French 75.

(Build)
Collins Glass
Make same as Tom Collins and
bring up with Champagne
instead of Seltzer.

Tom Collins:

Shell Glass 10 oz.
Squeeze and drop 1⁄2 Lime
Fill with Fine Ice
1 Jigger Lemon Juice
1 ” Simple Syrup or
1 Barspoon bar sugar
1 Jigger Gin
Stir
Fill with Seltzer Cherry
Serve with straws
(When sugar is used in this
drink, it should be shaken)

1972 Anonymus: Recipes – Wines and Spirits. Seite 46. French 75.

To make 1 cocktail
1 1/2 ounces fresh lemon juice
3 ounces gin
1 egg white
1/2 ounce (1 tablespoon) heavy cream
1 1/2 teaspoons superfine sugar
3 to 4 ice cubes
3 ounces cold Champagne
An 8-ounce wine or Champagne glass,
chilled
Combine the lemon juice, gin, egg white, cream, sugar and ice cubes in a
mixing glass. Place a shaker on top of the glass and, grasping them firm-
ly together with both hands, shake vigorously 10 to 12 times. Remove
the shaker, place a strainer on top of the mixing glass, and pour into a
chilled wine glass. Rinse the shaker with the Champagne and pour into
the glass.

1972 Leo Cotton: Old Mr. Boston. Seite 38. French “75”.

Juice of 1 Lemon
2 Teaspoons Powdered Sugar
Stir well in 12 oz. Tom Collins glass.
Then add 1 Cube of Ice, 2 oz. Old
Mr. Boston Dry Gin and fill with
Champagne and stir gently. Deco-
rate with slice of lemon, orange and
a cherry. Serve with straws.

1972 Trader Vic: Trader Vic’s Bartender’s Guide. Seite 223. French 75 – 1.

1 1/4 ounces gin
1/2 ounce sugar syrup
1 ounce lemon juice
Champagne
Shake gin, syrup, and lemon juice in commercial electric
drink mixer (or in shaker can with mixing glass) with ice
cubes. Pour into 10-ounce pilsener (or highball) glass. Fill
with about 2 ounces champagne.
Variation: Substitute cognac for gin.

1972 Trader Vic: Trader Vic’s Bartender’s Guide. Seite 223. French 75 – 2.

1 ounce cognac
Champagne
Pour cognac into chilled champagne saucer. Fill with cham-
pagne.

1973 Anonymus: 500 Ways to Mix Drinks. Seite 34. French “75”.

1 jigger dry gin
1/2 pony lemon juice
1 teaspoon granulated sugar
Chilled champagne
Pour this into an 8 oz. high­
ball glass to the half filled
with ice. Fill with chilled
champagne.

1973 Oscar Haimo: Cocktail and Wine Digest. Seite 60. “French 75”.

Juice of 1/2 Lemon. 1 tsp. Sugar, 2 oz. Gin. Serve in Tall
glass with Cracked Ice. Fill with Chilled Champagne. Stir.

1976 Anonymus: International Guide to Drinks. Seite 72. French 75.

Serve in highball glass
Juice of 1/2 lemon
1 teaspoonful of sugar
Gin to taste
Ice
Fill with champagne

1976 Brian F. Rea – Brian’s Booze Guide. Seite 50. French 75.

Blend/strain into tall collins glass filled with
ice cubes
1 1⁄2 ounces Brandy or Gin
1 1⁄2 ounces sweet and sour
Pour into collins glass and fill balance with Cham-
pagne, garnish with cherry and orange slice, straws.

1976 Harry Craddock: The Savoy Cocktail Book. Seite 73. The French “75” Cocktail.

2/3 Gin. 1/3 Lemon Juice.
1 Spoonful Powdered Sugar
Pour into tall glass containing
cracked Ice and Jill up with
Champagne.

1977 Stan Jones: Jones’ Complete Barguide. Seite 284. French 75.

Tall Glass Build
1 oz lemon juice
2 tsp sugar, stir
2 oz gin
Fill with ice, champagne
Lemon wedge, Cherry, Orange slice
Serve with straws

2009 Gaz Regan: The bartender’s Gin Compendium. Seite 274: French 75. 1 teaspoon simple syrup; 15 ml lemon juice; 30 ml gin; 120 ml chilled champagne.

2009 Ted Haigh: Vintage Spirits and Forgotten Cocktails. Seite 144. French 75. 6 cl gin; 3 cl lemon juice; 10 ml sugar or simple syrup; champagne; garnish: lemon spiral and cocktail cherry.

2010 Colin Peter Field: The Ritz Paris. Seite 71. French 75. 1 teaspoon sugar; 1/10 lemon juice; 2/10 Tanqueray gin; brut champagne; garnish: slice of lemon, orange and a morello cherry.

2010 Jason Kosmas & Dushan Zaric: Speakeasy. Seite 70. French 75. 1 1/4 ounces Tanqueray gin; 1/2 ounce lemon juice; 3/4 ounce simple syrup; 3 ounces Perrier-Jouët Grand Brut champagne; garnish: 1 orange wheel.

2011 Helmut Adam, Jens Hasenbein, Bastian Heuser: Cocktailian 1. Seite 360. French 75. 3 cl Gin; 1,5 cl Zitronensaft; 1 cl Zuckersirup (2:1); Champagner.

2011 Jim Meehan: Das Geheime Cocktail-Buch. Seite 127. French 75. 3 cl Tanqueray Gin; 1,5 cl Zitronensaft; 1,5 cl Zuckersirup; 3 cl Moët & Chandon Impérial Champagner; Garnitur: Zitronenschale.

2014 David Kaplan, Nick Fauchald, Alex Day: Death & Co. Seite 143. French 75. 1 1/2 ounces Plymouth gin; 3/4 ounce lemon juice; 1/2 ounce cane sugar syrup; dry champagne; garnish: 1 lemon twist.

2015 Duggan McDonnell: Drinking the devil’s acre. Seite 155. French 75. 30 ml G’Vine gin; 30 ml Armagnac; 30 ml lemon juice; 15 ml Cocktail Syrup; 30 ml sparkling wine; garnish: expressed lemon peel.

2016 André Darlington & Tenaya Darlington: The New Cocktail Hour. Seite 70. French 75. 30 ml gin (Plymouth); 15 ml lemon juice; 15 ml simple syrup; 120 ml Champagne (or crémant); garnish: lemon peel.

2016 Jamie Boudreau & James O. Fraioli: The Canon Cocktail Book. Seite 145. French 75. 2 ounces gin; 1/2 ounce lemon juice; 1/4 ounce simple syrup; 3 ounces dry sparkling wine; garnich: lemon twist.

2016 Sasha Petraske: Regarding Cocktails. Seite 161. French 75. 30 ml Cognac or gin; 15 ml lemon juice; 15 ml simple syrup; champagne, prosecco, or cava; garnish: lemon twist.

2017 Gary Regan: The Joy of Mixology. Seite 211. French 75. 1/2 teaspoon simple syrup; 1/2 ounce lemon juice; 2 ounces gin; 4 ounces chilled champagne.

2017 Jim Meehan: Meehan’s Bartender Manual. Seite 221. French 75. 1 oz. Tanqueray gin; 1 oz. Savart l’Ouverture champagne; 0,5 oz. lemon juice; 0,5 oz. simple syrup.

2018 Alex Day, Nick Fauchald, David Kaplan: Cocktail Codex. Seite 142. French 75. 1 ounce Plymouth gin; 1/2 ounce lemon juice; 1/2 ounce simple syrup; 4 ounces cold dry sparkling wine; garnish: 1 lemon twist.

2018 Gary Regan: The Joy of Mixology. Seite 211. French 75. 1/2 teaspoon simple syrup; 1/2 ounce lemon juice; 2 ounces gin; 4 ounces chilled champagne.

explicit capitulum
*

About

Hi, I'm Armin and in my spare time I want to promote bar culture as a blogger, freelance journalist and Bildungstrinker (you want to know what the latter is? Then check out "About us"). My focus is on researching the history of mixed drinks. If I have ever left out a source you know of, and you think it should be considered, I look forward to hearing about it from you to learn something new. English is not my first language, but I hope that the translated texts are easy to understand. If there is any incomprehensibility, please let me know so that I can improve it.

0 comments on “French 75

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.