Drinks

Canchánchara, Honeysuckle and Honey Bee

Canchánchara.

Unfortunately – it must be said – neither Caribbean field workers nor Cuban freedom fighters drank a mixture of rum, citrus juice and honey called canchánchara. This narrative is nothing more than a myth. For they drank something quite different.

70 ml Eminente Rum 3 years
30 ml lime juice
20 ml honey syrup

Preparation: Shaken. For the honey syrup, mix 145 g Alnatura forest honey with 125 g sugar syrup (2:1).

The Canchánchara – A drink of the field workers and independence fighters?

Canchánchara – many legends surround this mixed drink. It is said to have been originally prepared from rum or aguardiente with a little citrus juice and a source of sugar, preferably molasses or honey. It is said to have been something with which field workers on Caribbean sugar cane plantations made their arduous day’s work more bearable. [1] [2-171]

It is also said to have originated in Trinidad, Cuba, during the Ten Years’ War from 1868 to 1878, in which Cuba fought for its independence. Others report that this happened in the east of the island. It is said that the canchánchara was not initially prepared with rum, but with aguardiente. It is often said that it was sweetened with “miel”. This can be translated as “honey”, but it was also a term for molasses. And this is probably what was originally used, it is said. [3-116] [3-117] [4]

The New York Herald. 19. December 1872, page 4.
The New York Herald. 19. December 1872, page 4. [6]

Mr. Henderson mentions a drink called “Cuba Libre” in the New York Herald in 1872 and describes it as hot water with honey: “The repast consisted of one dish – roast beef – and nothing else, and in the way of liquids we were invited to hot water, sweetened with honey – a decoction known as “Cuba Libre.”[6]

Anistatia Miller and Jarred Brown interpret the “hot water” as aguardiente de caña. [3-117]

It is also reported, on the website of the El Floridita bar: “The combination of two thirds of rum and one third of lemon juice was an excellent cure for the thirst of the Cuban combatants fighting against the Spanish colonial army during the second part of the 19th century. It was an excellent painkiller for the injured persons. There is why a bottle of Canchánchara was often seeing hung at the saddle of the soldiers’ mount. From that time, it has been a synonym of the struggle of the Cuban people for their indepenence.[3-118] [5]

This story is also spread by Cuban tourism authorities. They report that the drink originated on plantations, that slaves drank it, as did Cuban freedom fighters, and that it is the original version of the daiquiri. [17]

It is undeniable, however, that both this type of canchánchara and the daiquiri are basically nothing more than a rum sour.

The disillusioning truth

Are these statements about the Canchánchara true? No.

For one thing, the story of El Floridita cannot be substantiated by original sources. Secondly, Anistatia Miller and Jarred Brown are mistaken in their assumption that “hot water” is not hot water, but aguardiente de caña. On what do we base this? One need only look at the three largest archives for digital copies: archive.org, hathitrust.org and books.google.de to see this.

The search for “canchánchara” at Hathitrust yields only one hit from the year 1899. books.google yields only ten hits before 1950, the oldest from the year 1921. Archive.org yields seven hits, starting with the year 1919. In some cases, the same sources are displayed. We will now look at the sources that provide more detailed information about the Canchánchara. Before we do so, let us recall Mr. Henderson’s statement from 1872, because we will find something similar again: “The repast consisted of one dish – roast beef – and nothing else, and in the way of liquids we were invited to hot water, sweetened with honey – a decoction known as “Cuba Libre.” [6]

Congressional Record. Vol. XXX. 1897, page 690.
Congressional Record. Vol. XXX. 1897, page 690. [11-690]

In 1897, it is reported in Washington in the Senate: “Every hardship, privation, and danger of the war has been shared by President Cisneros from the beginning. Such luxuries as bread and butter are absolutely unknown. A poor substitute for the former, called “casabe,” drifts into camp occasionally, but seldom lasts more than a day. Coffee is worth almost its weight in silver, and hard to get at any price. A drink called “canchanchara,” made by slightly scorching honey over the camp fire and afterwards adding boiling water, usually takes its place.. If honey can not be obtained, brown sugar in cakes (called “raspadura”) answers very well. Fresh beef and green bananas (“platinas”) are almost always on hand and in plenty. Sweet potatoes (“boneatas”) are abundant in some parts of the island.[11-690]

The Puritan. Vol. V, No. 1, 1899, page 78.
The Puritan. Vol. V, No. 1, 1899, page 78. [10-78]

In 1899, in an article entitled: “The aftermath of war. A picture of the Cuba of today.“ reports something similar:- „In the absence of coffee there were various substitutes. Perhaps the best of these was made from beans which grow upon a wild bush, palmarillas … Another substitute for coffee is called canchanchara. The Cuban boils some honey, removes the scum that rises to the top, adds water and a few orange leaves to give it flavor, and serves it hot. I have seen a party of as many as thirty persons, armed Cubans, assistentes, the women and chilren of the household, and, usually, the other American members of our party, imbibe this beverage with every appearance of serious appreciation. For myself, I always entertained suspicions that it was nothing but sweet hot water“. [10-78] September 4. – Lunch at Ramon Rodriguez’, Las Huntas, after riding fifteen miles. Boiled beef, boiled pork, boiled platina, one fried egg apiece; canchanchara.[10-79]

Anales de la Academia de la Historia, volume 3, number 1. 1921, page 72-73.
Anales de la Academia de la Historia, volume 3, number 1. 1921, page 72-73. [7-72] [7-73]

In 1921, the previous information was confirmed: “Agua de mono (sweet water). – This name was given to water boiled with rasdapura or bee honey during the Cuban War of Independence. There is nothing in our dictionaries, Spanish or Spanish-American. “with drinks such as Cuba Libre, sambumbia, canchánchara or agua de mono.” (Costa Francés, Recuerdos de Gula Lilref Habana, 1919, p. 110.)[7-72] [7-73]

– “Agua de mono. — Dióse este nombre en la guerra de independencia de Cuba al agua hervida con raspadura o miel de abejas. Nada hay en nuestros léxicos ni en los españoles ni en los hispano-americanos. con tragos de Cuba Libre, sambumbia, canchánchara o agua de mono. (Costa Francés, Recuerdos de Gula Lilref Habana, 1919, p. 110.)[7-72] [7-73]

Boletín de la Academia Argentina de Letras, volume 9, page 191. 1941.
Boletín de la Academia Argentina de Letras, volume 9, page 191. 1941. [13-191]

In 1941 it is written: “CANCHÀNCHARA. f. Cuba. Drink made from boiled water with raspadura or bee honey’. FO.[13-191]

“CANCHÀNCHARA. f. Cuba. ‘Bebida hecha de agua hervida con raspadura o miel de abejas’. FO.[13-191]

Anales de la sociedad de geografia e historia. 1946, page 301.
Anales de la sociedad de geografia e historia. 1946, page 301. [8-301]

In 1946 it is reported in connection with the Cuban War of Independence that took place between 1895 and 1898: “The canchánchara, a honey broth, and the roasted guanine usually replaced the coffee“. [8-301]

– “La canchánchara, que era una decocción de miel, y la guanina tostada, reeplazan corrientemente al café[8-301]

La Guerra de Independencia de Cuba, 1895-1898, volume 2. 1946.
La Guerra de Independencia de Cuba, 1895-1898, volume 2. 1946. [12-929]

Published in the same year, a book reports on the same war: “4. cooking and serving food and coffee or “canchánchara” at all times for legitimate and illegitimate visits.[12-929]

– “4. Cocinando y sirviendo a todas horas comida y café o “canchánchara” para las justificadas e injustificadas visitas.[12-929]

Fernando Campoamor also reports in his 1981 book on the history of Cuban rum that canchánchara was a hot drink and prepared without alcohol. [19]

As late as 1982, it was said: “Canchánchara. w. Drink prepared with boiled water and brown sugar or honey.[9-140]

Diccionario ilustrado sopena. 1982, page 140.
Diccionario ilustrado sopena. 1982, page 140. [9-140]

– “Canchánchara. F. Bebida preparada con agua hervida y azúcar moreno o miel.[9-140]

So what was meant by a canchánchara??

First of all, canchánchara is a Cuban drink. It was hot water sweetened with honey, or a block of brown sugar called raspadura, and drunk as a substitute for coffee. The honey was heated over a fire, presumably to caramelise it a little? Optionally, a few orange leaves could be added to improve the taste. As late as 1982, canchánchara is described in an encyclopaedia as sweetened water.

Against this background it becomes clear that the description from Bar la Floridita that Canchánchara contains rum and lemon juice cannot be true. They are only right in saying that it was drunk during the war of independence.

The legend that canchára was prepared with rum first appeared in the book “Hemingway in Cuba” by Norberto Fuentes, published in 1984. [19]

It is also interesting to note that this sweetened hot water is said to have been called Cuba Libre around 1872, long before the mixture of Coca-Cola, rum and lime was called that.

Analysis of historical recipes

It is striking that the canchanchara is not only missing from the dictionaries, but also from the historical recipe books, including the Cuban ones. It does not exist there. This again confirms the statement that canchanchara is nothing more than sweetened hot water.

Instead, however, there are numerous recipes of various names that combine rum, lemon or lime juice and honey. These are, each with indication of the first year of publication that we could find:

  • Southern Honeysuckle (1929)
  • Glorifier of the American Girl (1930)
  • Honey (1930); Ho-Hum (1933)
  • My Honey (1935)
  • Honeysuckle Cocktail (1940)
  • A Pastiche of Passion (1940)
  • Peter Vischer (1940)
  • Honey Bee Cocktail (1943)
  • Air Mail Cocktail (1945)
  • Tahitian Honey Bee (1946)
  • Jamaica Honey Bee (1948)
  • Princess (1951)
  • Bee’s Kiss (1952)
  • Passion (1956)

The Airmail Cocktail, however, is apparently usually made with champagne. The Honeysuckle not always with lemon juice, but instead just with a slice of lemon.

Nevertheless, the most commonly used names are Honeysuckle or Honey Bee. Of these two, however, Honeysuckle is the older name, so we would prefer this one. However, if you want to be precise and choose the name that first uses rum, lemon or lime juice and honey, you have to call the mixed drink Southern Honeysuckle.

Lonicera subspicata var. denudata.
Lonicera subspicata var. denudata. [16]

Why the drink was called Southern Honeysuckle can no longer be determined. The plant Lonicera subspicata is also called Southern Honeysuckle. It grows endemically in California. [15]

However, the Honeysuckle has a predecessor; as early as 1887, Charlie Paul described a “Rum and Honey”: “Take a wine glass; put in a small piece of ice; add a teaspoonful of Bourbon honey; fill up glass with “Liquid Sunshine” rum; stir well with spoon, and place slice of lemon on top.[14-60]

So how do you prepare a Honeysuckle?

The Honeysuckle is a rum sour that uses honey or honey syrup as a sweetener. According to the historical recipes, you can use lemon juice as well as lime juice.

Since the “Canchánchara”, or more correctly the Honeysuckle, is not an original Cuban drink, it does not have to be made with a Cuban rum. Nevertheless, many of the historical recipes suggest using a Cuban rum. In this sense, the Honeysuckle can be interpreted as a Daiquiri sweetened with honey syrup. However, other varieties are also suggested, often a rum from Jamaica, but also from Haiti, Puerto Rico or the West Indies. So you can use whatever rum you personally prefer or which harmonises particularly well with the honey you have chosen. This aroma then also determines whether you want to use lime or lemon juice. We personally find the combination of Cuban rum and lime the most successful and interpret the mixed drink as a honey Daiquiri.

If you like, you can also prepare the Honeysuckle with hot water. Then it is indeed something like a hot punch, consisting of distillate, water, citrus juice and honey as sweetener. Depending on how much water and juice is used, regardless of whether you serve the Honeysuckle cold or hot, the transitions between punch and sour are fluid.

Sources
  1. https://mixology.eu/cocktail-canchanchara/ Canchánchara. Hoffnung auf einen neuen Sommerdrink. 23. April 2013.
  2. Helmut Adam, Jens Hasenbein, Bastian Heuser: Cocktailian 2. Rum und Cachaça. ISBN 978-3-941641-46-4. 2011.
  3. Anistatia Miller & Jared Brown: Cuban Cocktails. ISBN 978-1-907434-10-5. Mixelany Limited. 2012.
  4. https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zehnj%C3%A4hriger_Krieg Zehnjähriger Krieg.
  5. https://web.archive.org/web/20190417125334/http://www.elfloridita.net/pages/Daiquiri.php?language=en Daiquiri’s story. The Canchánchara.
  6. https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83030313/1872-12-19/ed-1/seq-4/#date1=1872&sort=date&date2=1872&searchType=advanced&language=&sequence=0&lccn=sn83030313&lccn=sn83045774&index=9&words=hot+water&proxdistance=5&state=New+York&rows=20&ortext=&proxtext=&phrasetext=hot+water&andtext=&dateFilterType=yearRange&page=5 The New York Herald. 19. December 1872, page 4.
  7. https://archive.org/details/acj3603.1921.001.umich.edu/page/72/mode/2up?q=canchanchara Domingo Figarola-Caneda: Anales de la Academia de la Historia; publicación bimestre. volume 3, nr. 1, page 56: Dr. Juan Migual Dihigo: Léxico Cubano. Contribución al estudio de las voces que lo forman. Habana, 1921.
  8. https://archive.org/details/AnalesAGHGTomoXXIAnyoXXINos3y4SeptDic1946?q=canchanchara Anonymus: Anales de la sociedad de geografia e historia. Tomo XXI Año XXI. 1946.
  9. https://archive.org/details/americanismosdic0000unse/page/140/mode/2up?q=canchanchara Americanismos. Diccionario ilustrado sopena. ISBN 84-303-0892-X.Barcelona, 1982
  10. https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=uc1.c022624763&view=1up&seq=84&q1=canchanchara The Puritan. Vol. V, No. 1, February 1899. Mary C. Francis: The Aftermath of War. A Picture of the Cuba of Today. Page 73-84.
  11. https://books.google.de/books?id=9vbrxFCQ6pYC&pg=PA690&dq=canchanchara&hl=de&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwiPvIvB3_XsAhVROBoKHY11A_sQ6AEwAXoECAEQAg#v=onepage&q=canchanchara&f=false Congressional Record: Containing the proceedings and debates of the fifty-fifth congress first session; also special sessions of the senate. Vol. XXX. Washington, 1897.
  12. https://books.google.de/books?id=QWrUAAAAMAAJ&q=canch%C3%A1nchara&dq=canch%C3%A1nchara&hl=de&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwjdya7Xi_vsAhUSqaQKHZjVCqE4KBDoATAIegQIBxAC Miguel Angel Varona Guerrero: La Guerra de Independencia de Cuba, 1895-1898. Volume 2. 1946.
  13. https://books.google.de/books?id=dI0wAAAAYAAJ&q=canch%C3%A1nchara&dq=canch%C3%A1nchara&hl=de&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwi7nonBi_vsAhXMzqQKHStAD9c4MhDoATACegQICRAC Anonymus: Boletín de la Academia Argentina de Letras. Volume 9. 1941.
  14. Charlie Paul: American and Other Iced Drinks Containing the Most Approved Recipes for Making the Principal „Drinks“ Used In the United States and Throughout the World. London, McCorquodale & Co. Limited, London, 1887.
  15. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lonicera_subspicata Lonicera subspicata.
  16. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Lonicerasubspicatadenudata.jpg Lonicera subspicata var. denudata at the Wild Animal Park, Escondido, California, USA.
  17. https://spiritsandcocktails.community/t/canchanchara-cubas-ur-cocktail/94 Canchánchara – Cuba’s Ur Cocktail. By François, 13. April 2019.
Canchánchara.
Canchánchara.Historical recipes

Historical recipes

Only recipes prepared with rum, lemon or lime juice and honey are included here, or the finds for Honeysuckle and Honey Bee; the Air-Mail recipes with champagne are missing, for example.

1925 Nina Toye & A. H. Adair: Seite 50. Drinks Long & Short. Honeysuckle.

Dissolve two teaspoonfuls of honey in a
tumbler with boiling water. Add a slice of
lemon, some rum (as much or as little as you
like) and fill up the glass with hot water. Stir
thoroughly.

1927 Nina Toye & A. H. Adair: Petits & grands verres. Seite 89. Le Chèvrefeuille. Honeysuckle.

Dans un verre rempli d’eau bouillante, faire fondre
deux petites cuillerées de miel. Verser dans un grand
verre et y ajouter une tranche de citron et du rhum
(plus ou moins selon le goût). Finir avec de l’eau très
chaude et remuer soigneusement.

1929 Judge Jr.: Here’s How Again. Seite 19. Southern Honeysuckle.

1/3 Bacardi
1/3 Lemon juice
1/3 Honey

1930 Judge Jr.: Noble Experiments. Seite 23. “Glorifier of the American Girl”.

THE FAVORITE CONCOCTION OF
Florenz Ziegfeld
THE “glorifier of the American
Girl” guarantees this one.

A Bacardi Cocktail with strained
honey — to make 8 cocktails,
using a cocktail glass for measure­-
ment:
3 glasses Lime juice
1/2 glass strained honey
(mixed with above — more
honey if more sweetness is
desired)
4 glasses of Bacardi
Shake well.

1930 Harry Craddock: The Savoy Cocktail Book. Seite 47. Honey.

Bacardi . . . . . . . . . 1/2 jigger Lime . . . . . . . 1/4 jigger
. Honey . . . . 1 spoon
Shake well with ice, strain into chilled cocktail glass and serve.

1930 William T. Boothby. „Cocktail Bill“ Boothby’s World Drinks. Seite 47. Honey.

Bacardi . . . . . . . . 1/2 jigger Lime . . . . . . . . . . . 1/4 jigger
. Honey . . . . . . . 1 spoon
Shake well with ice, strain into chilled cocktail glass and serve.

1931 Ignacio Domenech: El arte del cocktelero europeo. Seite 17. Le Chevrefeuille (Ponche caliente) Honey Suckle.

En un vaso pequeño se llena hasta la mitad de agua hirvien-
do; en ella se funden dos cucharaditas de buena miel; se vuelca
esta mezcla en un vaso alto y añadir una rodaja de limón y
ron (en más o menos cantidad, según el gusto). Se termina con
aumentarle agua hirviendo. Remuévase con cuidado y se sirvé.

1933 George A. Lurie: Here’s How. Seite 43. Ho-Hum.

Bacardi . . . . . . . . . . 1 pony Lime . . . . . . . . . . 1/4 jigger
. Honey . . . . . . . . . . . 1 spoon
Shake well with ice, strain into chilled cocktail glass and
serve.

1934 William T. Boothby. „Cocktail Bill“ Boothby’s World Drinks. Seite 87. Honey.

Bacardi . . . . . . . . 1/2 jigger Lime . . . . . . . . . . . 1/4 jigger
. Honey . . . . . . . 1 spoon
Shake well with ice, strain into chilled cocktail glass and serve.

1935 Adrian: Cocktail Fashions of 1936. Seite 53. My Honey.

Juice of 1/2 lime.
One barspoon honey.
1 jigger rum.
Dissolve the honey with the rum, add the lime
juice and shake well.

1937 R. de Fleury: 1800 – And All That. Seite 82. My Honey.

Juice of 1/2 Lime
1 Barspoonful Honey
1/2 Oz. Rum
Dissolve the Honey
with the Rum, add the
Lime Juice and shake
well.

1937 R. de Fleury: 1800 – And All That. Seite 221. Honeysuckle.

Dissolve two teaspoon-
fuls of Honey in a
tumbler of Boiling
Water. Add a slice
of Lemon and add
some Rum. Fill up
with Hot Water. Stir
well and serve.

1938 Hyman Gale & Gerald F. Marco: The How and When. Seite 118. Ho-Hum Cocktail.

1 pony Bacardi
1/4 jigger Lime Juice
1 spoon Honey
Shake well
Strain into Cocktail Glass

1939 Ambrose Heath: Good Drinks. Seite 73. Honeysuckle.

Dissolve two teaspoonfuls of honey in a tum-
bler with boiling water. Add a slice of Lemon,
Rum to your taste or discretion, fill up with hot
water and stir well before sampling.

1940 Anonymus: Professional Mixing Guide. Seite 36. Honeysuckle Cocktail.

Juice 1/2 Lemon,11/2 oz West Indies
Rum, 1 teaspoonful strained Honey.
Dissolve the Honey in the Lemon
juice and Rum. Add ice, shake and
strain into cocktail glass.

1940 Crosby Gaige: Crosby Gaige’s Cocktail Guide. Seite 51. A Pastiche of Passion.

1 jigger Jamaica Rum
4 jiggers Daiquiri Cocktelera Rum
1 teaspoon of Honey
Juice of 2 Limes
Put ingredients into cocktail shaker full of
ice cubes and shake vigorously. Lest its potency be
lost, pour immediately into cocktail glasses and serve
to the deserving.

1940 Crosby Gaige: Crosby Gaige’s Cocktail Guide. Seite 114. Peter Vischer.

1 jigger West Indies Rum
Juice of 1/2 Lemon
1 teaspoon strained Honey
Dissolve honey in the lemon juice, add
the rum, and shake in cracked ice. Strain into cocktail
glass.

1943 Oscar Haimo: Cocktails. Seite 46. Honey Bee Cocktail.

2 oz. Jamaica Rum
1/4 oz. Honey
1/2 oz. Lemon Juice
Shake.

1943 Oscar Haimo: Cocktails. Seite 46. Honey Suckle Cocktail.

1 oz. Rum
Juice of Half Lemon
1/4 oz. Honey
Shake.

1944 Crosby Gaige: The Standard Cocktail Guide. Seite 58. Peter Vischer.

1 jigger West Indies Rum
Juice of 1/2 Lemon
1 teaspoon Strained Honey
Dissolve Honey in the Lemon Juice, add the
Rum, and shake in cracked ice. Strain into
Cocktail glass.

1944 Oscar Haimo: Cocktail Digest. Seite 57. Honey Bee Cocktail.

Juice of 1/2 Florida Seedless Lime
1/4 oz. Honey
2 oz. Jamaica Rum
Shake well.

1944 Oscar Haimo: Cocktail Digest. Seite 58. Honey Suckle Cocktail.

Juice of 1/2 Lemon
1/4 oz. Honey
2 oz. Rum
Shake well.

1945 R. M. Barrows & Betty Stone: 300 Ways to Mix Drinks. Seite 5. Air Mail Cocktail.

1/2 Juice of a Lime
1 Teaspoon Honey
1 1/2 Oz. Cuban Rum
Shake well with ice, pour in
large glass and fill with
Champagne.

1946 Lucius Beebe: The Stork Club Bar Book. Seite 57. Honey Bee.

2 oz. Jamaica rum
1/4 oz. honey
1/2 oz. lemon juice
Shake and serve in 3 oz. cocktail glass.

1946 Lucius Beebe: The Stork Club Bar Book. Seite 112. Broolynite.

dash of lime juice
1/2 oz. of honey
2 oz. Jamaica rum
dash of Angostura bitters
Shake well and strain. Serve in 3 oz. cocktail
glass.

1946 Oscar Haimo: Cocktail and Wine Digest. Seite 63. Honey Bee Cocktail.

Juice of 1/2 Lime
1/4 oz. Honey
2 oz. Jamaica Rum
Shake well.

1946 Oscar Haimo: Cocktail and Wine Digest. Seite 63. Honey Suckle Cocktail.

Juice of 1/2 Lemon
1/4 oz. Honey
2 oz. Rum
Shake well.

1946 Trader Vic: Trader Vic’s Book of Food and Drink. Seite 107. Tahitian Honey Bee.

Those bees sure do get around. A smooth drink
— no stingers.
1 teaspoon honey
1 1/2 ounce lemon juice
1 1/2 ounces Puerto Rican rum (Ron Merito,
Boca Chica, or Brugal)
Mix honey with lemon juice in shaker, add rum,
and shake with ice; strain into chilled cocktail glass
and serve with twist of lemon peel.

1947 A. Vermeys: Cocktails. Seite 50. Honey Suckle (le Chèvrefeuille).

Dans un verre rempli d’eau bouillante faire
fondre deux petites cuillerées de miel. Verser
dans un grand verre et y ajouter une tranche
de citron et du Rhum (plus ou moins selon le
goût). Finir avec de l’eau très chaude et re-
muer soigneusement.

1948 David A. Embury: The Fine Art of Mixing Drinks. Seite 124. Honey-Suckle, Honey Bee und Airmail.

BEE’S KNEES
1 part Honey
2 parts Lemon Juice
8 parts Gin
Shake vigorously with cracked ice. The addition of a
small amount of orange juice (about 1 to 2 parts)
makes an interesting variation.

The same drink, except for the use of white Cuban
rum in place of the gin, is known as the HONEY
SUCKLE. The same drink with Jamaica rum is the
HONEY BEE. The Honeysuckle is also sometimes
called the AIRMAIL.

1948 George Albert Zabriskie: The Bon Vivant’s Guide. Seite 15. Honeysuckle Cocktail.

Juice of 1/2 lemon
1 1/2 ounces of rum
1 teaspoonful of honey
Dissolve honey in the lemon juice and rum
Add ice, shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

1948 Trader Vic: Bartender’s Guide. Seite 220. Jamaica Honey Bee.

2 oz. Jamaica rum 1 tbs. honey
. 1/2 oz. lemon juice
Shake with fine ice; strain into large chilled cocktail glass.

1948 Trader Vic: Bartender’s Guide. Seite 220. Tahitian Honey Bee.

1 1/2oz. Puerto Rican rum 1/2 oz. lemon juice
. 1 tsp. honey
Mix honey with lemon juice in shaker; add rum and shake
with cracked ice; strain into chilled cocktail glass; serve with
twist of lemon peel. Variation: Increase rum to 2 oz. and
honey to 1/4 oz. Note: Most cocktails with honey are calles
Honey Bees, Honey, etc.

1950 Ted Shane: Authentic and Hilarious Bar Guide. Seite 91. Tahitian Honey Bee.

1/2 oz. Lemon Juice 1 tsp. Honey
. 1 jigger Puerto Rican Rum
Mix honey with lemon juice in shaker. Add rum and
shake with cracked ice and strain. Serve with
twist of lemon peel.

1951 Ted Saucier: Ted Saucier’s Bottoms Up. Seite 197. Princess.

Courtesy, Princess Lounge, Royal York Hotel, Toronto
1/2 oz. Ronrico rum
3/4 oz. lemon juice
3/4 oz. honey
Dissolve honey in lemon juice before adding rum.
Shake with chipped ice and strain into gin sour
glass.

1952 Anonymus: Cocktails. Seite 65. Bee’s Kiss.

Dans le shaker:
Le jus d’1/4 de citron,
Une cuiller à café de miel,
Un demi-verre de rhum Bacardi,
Bien frapper et servir.

1953 Anonymus: Esquire’s Handbook for Hosts. Seite 127. Honey Bee.

1 part honey
4 parts Bacardi
1 part lemon juice
Mix well, then add ice and shake.

1953 Anonymus: The ABC of Cocktails. Seite 29. Honey Bee.

6 parts Jamaica Rum
2 parts Lime Juice
1 part Honey
A Rum Sour, using Jamaica Rum,
and Honey instead of sugar sirup.

1953 Anonymus: The ABC of Cocktails. Seite 31. Honeysuckle.

6 parts White Label Rum
2 parts Lime Juice
1 part Honey
A Rum Sour with Honey instead of
sugar sirup.

1953 David A. Embury: The Fine Art of Mixing Drinks. Seite 130. Honeysuckle, Honey Bee, Airmail.

The same drink [Anmerkung: Bee’s Knees], except for the use of white Cuban rum in place
of the gin, is known as the HONEYSUCKLE. The same drink with
Jamaica rum is the HONEY BEE. The Honeysuckle is also sometimes
called the AIRMAIL.

Anmerkung: Der Bee’s Knees wird wie folgt gemacht:

1 part Honey
2 parts Lemon Juice
8 parts Gin
Shake vigorously with cracked ice.

1953 Marcel et Roger Louc: Cocktails et Grand Crus. Seite 64. Honey Bee Cocktail.

Le jus d’un demi-citron
Une cuillère à café de mie!
1/2 Rhum blanc
1/2 Cognac.

1954 Robert H. Loeb, Jr.: Nip Ahoy. Seite 53. Honeysuckle Cocktail.

Robert H. Loeb, Jr. Nip Ahoy. 1954, Seite 53.
Robert H. Loeb, Jr. Nip Ahoy. 1954, Seite 53.

1956 Patrick Gavin Duffy: The Official Mixer’s Manual. Seite 86. Honeybee.

1-1/2 Jiggers Light Rum
1/3 Jigger Lemon Juice
1 Tablespoon Honey
Shake well with ice and strain
into glass.

1956 Patrick Gavin Duffy: The Official Mixer’s Manual. Seite 86. Honeysuckle.

1 Jigger Gold Label Rum
1 Teaspoon Honey
Juice of 1/2 Lime or Lemon
Shake very well with ice and
strain into glass.

1956 Patrick Gavin Duffy: The Official Mixer’s Manual. Seite 88. Passion.

(for 4)
1 Jigger Jamaica Rum
4 Jiggers Light Rum
1 Teaspoon Honey
Juice of 2 Limes
Shake well with ice and strain
into glasses.

1957 Lawrence Blochman: Here’s How. Seite 56. Honeysuckle.

1 jigger light rum
1 teaspoon honey
Juice of 1/2 lemon
Cracked ice
Shake this one, too, honey.

1960 Anonymus: Tout les cocktails et les boissons rafraichissante. Seite 58. Honey Suckle.

1 verre de Rhum
2 cuillerées de miel
1 tranche de citron
Eau chaude

1963 Luigi Veronelli: I cocktails. Seite 59. Air Mail Cocktail.

1 bicchiere e 1/3 di rhum della Giamaica
1/3 di bicchiere di succo di limone spremuto dalla
sola polpa
1 cucchiaio di miele
ghiaccio a cubetti
Riempire lo shaker fino a 1/4 della sua altezza con ghiac-
cio. Aggiungere il succo di limone, il rhum ed il miele.
Chiudere lo shaker, agitarlo vigorosamente, lasciar ripo-
sare un secondo, riprendere infine ad agitare ma lenta-
mente. Servire subito.

1963 Luigi Veronelli: I cocktails. Seite 81. Bee’s Kiss Cocktail.

1 bicchiere e 1/3 di rhum cubano bianco
1/3 di bicchiere di succo di limone spremuto dalla
sola polpa
1 cucchiaio di miele
ghiaccio tritato
Riempire lo shaker fino a 1/3 della sua altezza con ghiac-
cio tritato. Aggiungere il succo di limone, il rhum ed il
miele. Chiudere lo shaker, agitarlo vigorosamente, lasciarlo
riposare un secondo, riprendere infine ad agitarlo ma più
lentamente. Servire subito.

1963 Luigi Veronelli: I cocktails. Seite 224. Princess Cocktail.

1 bicchiere e 1/3 di rhum di Haiti
1/3 di bicchiere di succo di limone spremuto dalla
sola polpa
1 cucchiaio di miele
ghiaccio tritato
Riempire lo shaker fino a 1/3 della sua altezza con ghiac­-
cio tritato. Aggiungere il succo di limone, il rhum e il
miele. Chiudere lo shaker, agitarlo vigorosamente, farlo
riposare due secondi, riprendere infine ad agitare ma len­-
tamente. Servire subito.

1964 Anonymus: Peter Pauper’s Drink Book. Seite 13. Honey Bee.

6 parts Jamaica 2 parts Lime Juice
Rum 1 part Honey
A Rum Sour, using Jamaica rum, and honey
13instead of sugar syrup. Light rum can also be
used with honey for sweetening.

1965 Harry Schraemli: Manuel du bar. Seite 343. Airmail Cocktail.

Se prépare comme le Honeysuckle Cocktail.

1965 Harry Schraemli: Manuel du bar. Seite 416. Honey Bee Cocktail.

1 cuillère à bar de miel, 1/6 jus de citron, 5/6 rhum de la Jamaïque. Bien
agiter.

1965 Harry Schraemli: Manuel du bar. Seite 416. Honeysuckle Cocktail.

1 cuillère à bar de miel, 1/6 jus de citron, 5/6 rhum blanc de Cuba. Agi­-
ter vigoureusement.

1965 Robert London & Anne London: Cocktails and Snacks. Seite 44. Honey Bee Cocktail.

1/4 ounce honey 1/4 ounce lemon juice
2 ounces Bacardi rum
Shake with cracked ice. Strain into cocktail glass.

1965 Robert London & Anne London: Cocktails and Snacks. Seite 44. Honeysuckle Cocktail.

Juice of 1/2 lemon 1 1/2 ounces gold label rum
1 teaspoon strained honey
Blend the honey in the juice and ram. Add ice and shake well. Strain
into cocktail glass.

1966 Harry Schraemli: Le roi du bar. Seite 19. Airmail.

Shaker. 1 cb ]cuillère de bar] de miel, 1/6 jus de citron, 5/6
rhum blanc. Agiter. Verser dans un verre
à Champagne, finir de remplir avec un bon
mousseux frappé.

1966 Harry Schraemli: Le roi du bar. Seite 103. Honey Bee Cocktail.

Shaker. 1 cb [cuillère de bar] de miel, 1/6 jus de citron, 5/6
rhum de la Jamaïque.

1966 Harry Schraemli: Le roi du bar. Seite 104. Honeysuckle Cocktail.

Shaker. 1 cb [cuillère de bar] de miel, 1/6 jus de citron, 5/6
rhum blanc.

1968 Anonymus: The Dieter’s Drink Book. Seite 13. Honey Bee.

2 oz. light Bacardi rum
1/2 tbs. honey
1/2 lbs. lemon juice
Stir honey and lemon juice until honey has dis­-
solved. Add rum; then shake vigorously with
cracked ice. Strain into chilled cocktail glass.
Garnish with lime slice or twist.

1972 Trader Vic: Trader Vic’s Bartender’s Guide. Seite 156. Honeysuckle.

1 1/2 ounces Barbados rum
1 teaspoon honey
Juice of 1 lime or 1/2 lemon
Shake well with ice cubes. Strain into chilled cocktail glass.

1972 Trader Vic: Trader Vic’s Bartender’s Guide. Seite 158. Jamaica Honey Bee.

2 ounces Jamaica rum
1 tablespoon honey
1/2 ounce lemon juice
Shake with ice cubes. Strain into chilled large cocktail glass.

1972 Trader Vic: Trader Vic’s Bartender’s Guide. Seite 185. Tahitian Honey Bee.

1/2 ounce lemon juice
1 teaspoon honey
1 1/2 ounces light Puerto Rican rum
Mix lemon juice and honey in shaker. Add rum. Shake with
ice cubes. Strain into chilled cocktail glass. Add a twist of
lemon peel.
Variation: Increase rum to 2 ounces and honey to 1/4 ounce.

1977 Stan Jones: Jones’ Complete Barguide. Seite 305. Honeybee.

Cocktail Glass Shake
1-1/2 oz rum
3/4 oz lemon juice
1/2 oz honey

1977 Stan Jones: Jones’ Complete Barguide. Seite 305. Honeysuckle.

Cocktail Glass Shake
1-1/2 oz gold rum
1/2 oz lime (or lemon) juice
1/2 oz honey

1977 Stan Jones: Jones’ Complete Barguide. Seite 317. Jamaican Honeybee.

Cocktail Glass Shake
1/2 oz lemon juice
2 oz Jamaican rum
1/2 oz honey

1977 Stan Jones: Jones’ Complete Barguide. Seite 413. Tahitian Honey Bee.

Cocktail Glass Shake
Shake together
1/2 oz honey &
1/2 oz lemon juice
Add 1-1/2 oz rum
Shake

2011 Helmut Adam, Jens Hasenbein, Bastian Heuser: Cocktailian 2. Seite 171. Canchanchara. 6 cl kubanischer weißer Rum oder Aguardiente; 3 BL Honig; 2,5 cl Limettensaft.

2014 David Kaplan, Nick Fauchald, Alex Day: Death & Co. Seite 144. Honeysuckle. 2 ounces Flor de Caña extra-dry white rum; 3/4 ounce lime juice; 3/4 ounce acacia honey syrup; garnish: lime wedge.

explicit capitulum
*

About

Hi, I'm Armin and in my spare time I want to promote bar culture as a blogger, freelance journalist and Bildungstrinker (you want to know what the latter is? Then check out "About us"). My focus is on researching the history of mixed drinks. If I have ever left out a source you know of, and you think it should be considered, I look forward to hearing about it from you to learn something new. English is not my first language, but I hope that the translated texts are easy to understand. If there is any incomprehensibility, please let me know so that I can improve it.

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