Drinks

Gin & Tonic – Part 5 – The origin of Gin & Tonic

Gin & Tonic.

Having looked in detail at quinine, quinine wine and tonic water, we now come to the end of the series and turn to Gin & Tonic. Was it a remedy against malaria? Since when has it been prepared and where did it happen first? Did it change over time? This post gives an answer to that question.


40 ml Eversbusch Doppelwachholder
80 ml Thomas Henry Dry Tonic

Preparation: Pour the ingredients into the highball glass over ice cubes. Stir carefully.

Let’s get to the point right at the beginning of this text: Nowhere in the surviving sources is there a hint that tonic water was drunk for medicinal reasons, as a prophylactic or to treat malaria.

Gin & Tonic – A remedy against malaria?

It is often claimed that the Gin & Tonic was an invention of officers in the Indian army. They would have taken their daily dose of quinine with gin and soda. Some say this happened as early as 1825, just five years after quinine could first be extracted from cinchona bark. Although gin, quinine and soda were available in India, it is unlikely that this is the origin of Gin & Tonic. There are no sources to support this. [2-91] Before 1868, there is no evidence that a tonic water containing quinine was mixed with gin. [2-87] Moreover, in the previous part of this series we proved that tonic water contained and still contains far too little quinine for the amount of quinine necessary for prophylaxis to be taken in a meaningful way.

There are similar stories from France for Dubonnet, a quinine-infused aperitif wine first sold in 1846. It is said that this wine was ordered by the government to be given to the Foreign Legion as a remedy against malaria. [2-91] [11] But this story, too, seems to be just a myth, [2-91] because here, too, the quinine content was either too low or the recipe was dramatically changed.

We must also note that quinine was not used by the British Army as a daily preventative for malaria until the 1850s. [2-91] [2-92]

Based on this finding, it is therefore not surprising that one cannot find any recommendations for taking a Gin & Tonic as a preventive remedy against malaria, [2-92] quite apart from the fact that this did not work at all due to the small amount of quinine.

In addition, an experiment in 2004 showed that hardly any prevention can be achieved with today’s tonic water. Even after consuming one litre of tonic water within 15 minutes, only a minimal effect against malaria could be proven with a blood test. [2-92] [2-93]

But even though tonic water does not and did not help against malaria, let us now take a closer look, in chronological order, at the references to Gin & Tonic that can be found in historical sources up to the year 1900.

The Gin & Tonic in historical sources

The first reference to a Gin & Tonic is found in the Oriental Sporting Magazine of 1868, ten years after Erasmus Bond was granted a patent for tonic water containing quinine. There it says in connection with horse racing: “there was plenty of betting, and our modest fiver went on Polly, more for the sake of backing her rider than thinking of what class she was. Loud cries of “gin and tonic,” “brandy and soda,” “cheroots,” &c., told us the party was breaking up for the night, and we wended our way home …” [2-99] [15]

The Medical Press & Circular. 4. August 1875, page 88.
The Medical Press & Circular. 4. August 1875, page 88. [16-88]

On 4 August 1875, an article in The Medical Press and Circular entitled “Indian Medical Notes” deals with the daily routine of an officer: “Careful officers have a cup of tea about five in the morning, then, perhaps, about nine or ten, oatmeal porridge, fried mullet, strawberries or sliced tomatoes – perhaps a light lunch of cold chicken, perhaps none; perhaps sherry and bitters at the club – the comfortable Wheler Club; perhaps a gin tonic well iced – anything to sustain Nature until eight o clock dinner, when the cautious drink claret or a little sherry, the economical subaltern his dearly beloved beer; later in the evening acup of coffee, the best of all comforters – the cigar, then a game of billiards, a hand at whist or a cosy, comfortable armchair, a soft pleasant light to read the newspapers, periodicals or a novel by Trollope, Whyte, Melville or some sensational dashing lady writer – then to bed. This ascetic life is not led by all.” [2-99] [16-88]

On 14 May 1881, a letter to the editor was published in The Sporting Times. It states: “To the editor of the ‚Sporting Times‘ Dear Sir, – Why, in the name of all that is mysterious, is not tonic water procurable in England – the land that boasts almost every kind of mineral water? I have passed a good portion of my life in the land of India and have now just returned after a six years‘ sojourn in that country. India has its blessings, as well as its – well the reverse of blessings – but one of its greatest enjoyments is the pleasant ‚peg‘. We have out brandies and sodas, as well as other drinks procurable in this delightful country, but we fail to find here the drink most patronised in India, viz., gin and tonic. Of course, the gin is to be had, but where is the tonic? This question I want to ask you, you may be able to answer it or if not, by kindly inserting it in the Pink ‘Un it may catch the eye of an old Indian, and he may be able to inform me through your paper if I can obtain, and if so, where, the drink required. I am, sir, yours faithfully, ANGLO-INDIAN. April 28th 1881.” [2-113]

[Question to the readers: what does “by kindly inserting it in the Pink” mean?]

This is an amazing letter to the editor. Apparently, a tonic water containing chinine was hardly available in England in 1881. One might find it hard to believe. But this is consistent with the statement that until the mid-1920s Gin & Tonic was considered a tropical drink. [2-114] It was therefore more likely to be drunk in India than in England, and accordingly the mentions we have been able to find refer to India and neighbouring countries.

The Gin & Tonic in India and its environs

1882 is in the Aberdeen Journal in an article entitled “A morning with bobber pack”: “we were drinking gin and tonic under the old tree on the Calcutta maidan.” [2-100]

Anonymus: Chums: A Tale of the Queen’s Navy. Vol. 1. 1882, page 273.
Anonymus: Chums: A Tale of the Queen’s Navy. Vol. 1. 1882, page 273. [14-273]

In “Chums: A Tale of the Queen’s Navy” one reads, also in 1882: “”Just one B. and S. before you go, then,” suggested the colonel; “or a gin and tonic, eh?”” [14-273]

Hugh Wilkinson: Sunny lands and seas. 1883, page 57.
Hugh Wilkinson: Sunny lands and seas. 1883, page 57. [13-57]

Hugh Wilkinson writes in 1883 in “Sunny Lands and Seas: A Voyage in the SS. Ceylon”: “we left, seeking to consolation of ‚tin gonics.‘ * … * Gin tonics, viz. gin and tonic water.[2-100] [13-57]

The Saturday Review of Politics, Literature, Science, and Art. No. 1428, Vol. 55. 10. March 1883, page 313.
The Saturday Review of Politics, Literature, Science, and Art. No. 1428, Vol. 55. 10. March 1883, page 313. [10-313]

Referring to this writing, The Saturday Review of Politics, Literature, Science, And Art notes: “What are we to think of an author who facetiously turns the name of his companion, Mr. Wood, into De Bosco, informs us in a note that by “ tin gonics “ he means „gin tonics,“ and holds that a supply of that truly delicious fruit, the mangosteen, would “ do people more spiritual good than all the ministers of every known religion in the world are able to do“ ?” [10-313]

Raoul: Reminiscences of twenty years‘ pigsticking in Bengal. 1893, page 88.
Raoul: Reminiscences of twenty years‘ pigsticking in Bengal. 1893, page 88. [9-88]

In 1893 we read in “Reminiscences of Twenty Years’ Pigsticking in Bengal”: “This last ride made us considerably thirsty, so we made our way to a big tree at the edge of the tank, where the liquor-boxes were. Most of us had dismounted but the old Judge preffered imbibing on horseback; he got a glass of gin-tonic, and the twinkle in his eyes showed that he was going to enjoy it when, all of a sudden, there were shouts of a mad buffalo charging. I believe it was Gibson who gave the first alarm. The big Judge on the big horse, was the first to draw the buffalo’s attention, and as he charged Bainbridge did not wait to look for his glasses or finish his peg, but dropping his gin-tonic he soon cleared out.” [2-99] [9-88]

James Moray Brown: Stray sport. Vol. 1. 1893, page 127.
James Moray Brown: Stray sport. Vol. 1. 1893, page 127. [8-127]

In the same year, James Moray Brown writes in “Stray Sport”: “On reaching camp, promptly indulged in a „gin-and-tonic,“ that most admirable drink; for I had a long tramp, and, ergo, deserved a „long drink.“[8-127]

James Moray Brown: Stray sport. Vol. 1. 1893, page 143.
James Moray Brown: Stray sport. Vol. 1. 1893, page 143. [8-143]

“After dismounting and imbibing a refreshing „peg“ of gin-and-tonic, a grateful beverage with which to wash the dust out of our throats, we hastily donned our bathing-drawers, whilst the bhisti gave us our evening tub.” [8-143]

Rudyard Kipling: The Cause of Humanity and Other Stories. 2018, page 22.
Rudyard Kipling: The Cause of Humanity and Other Stories. 2018, page 22. [17-22]

In 1885 Rudyard Kipling, who often had malaria in India, wrote in an account: “… nor the fascinations of a gin and tonic at the peg table will keep him at bay. … The unstricken observer would tell you … that this phenomenon is simply the result of the quinine taken a few hours ago.[2-35] [17-22]

This is a very interesting finding, because it suggests that quinine was taken as a medicine, but not in the form of a Gin & Tonic, which was obviously only drunk for pleasure – and as we had already deduced, did not contain a medically effective dose of quinine. This source therefore supports our conclusions so far.

Hugh Reginald Haweis: Travel and talk. Vol. 2. 1896, page 176 & 177.
Hugh Reginald Haweis: Travel and talk. Vol. 2. 1896, page 176 & 177. [7-176] [7-177]

Hugh Reginald Haweis writes in his book about his travels, published in 1896, also about the tea planters in Ceylon: “Other young men, frequently well connected, lived at an interval of two to six miles in similar bungalows – some engaged as outdoor inspectors; some superintending the factory work; most of them seemend not without their consolations in the land of exile. They did not go to Colombo frequently, but they were to be found often in each other’s bungalows, and whisky and gin tonics and tobacco seemed somewhat to ease and lighten the burden of the day. … Of course young men grumble: the climate is trying, gin tonics are expensive, pay is low, promotion is slow, society limited, isolation from books, theatres, music and the rush of London, painful;” [7-175] [7-176] [7-177]

This is another interesting finding. Not only the small amount of quinine in a Gin & Tonic speaks against its ingestion as a medicine, but also the fact that it was apparently rather an expensive luxury good to pay for, especially when imported tonic water was used and then ice was also needed in hot India. This ice was apparently (also?) imported. For example, we know that Frederick Tudor, the “King of Ice”, shipped a total of 146000 tons of ice to India in 1856. Ice may also have been made locally, as the first ice machines were already operating in the 1830s. [2-104]

A. G. Bagot: Sport and travel in India and Central America. 1897, page 182-183.
A. G. Bagot: Sport and travel in India and Central America. 1897, page 182-183. [6-182] [6-183]
“Sport and Travel in India and Central America” reports on an event in Calcutta, India, in 1897″ “It was after the first day of a cricket match …, and we had a real doing all day in the sun, and consequently had put away a fair shade of gin and tonic, etc., etc.[6-182] [6-183]

A. G. Bagot: Sport and travel in India and Central America. 1897, page 193.
A. G. Bagot: Sport and travel in India and Central America. 1897, page 193. [6-193]

Then, on a trip to the mangrove forests of the Sundarbands [5], they say:- „where I was sitting ruminating over … some gin-and-tonic water …[6-193]

Why was tonic water actually mixed with gin?

As we have already explained, tonic water was not taken for medicinal reasons. For this purpose, quinine was mixed with wine or other spirits. Even though we have found no evidence that gin was used, this may well have been done, and in order to soften the bitterness, some people may have had the idea of adding sugar and perhaps some citrus juice – the addition of acid improves the solubility of the quinine. In any case, people will have become accustomed to the bitter medicine they have to take every day, and so the way was paved for a slightly bitter everyday drink for refreshment. Slightly bitter tonic water entered this niche, was mixed with a little gin and thus prepared a kind of instant punch – after all, besides the bitterness, tonic water also provided acidity and water instead of spices and probably also sugar, which may have been contained in it. Tonic water became a fashion and was consumed as a stimulant.

Matthew Hartings from the American University also speaks in favour of mixing tonic water with gin. He writes that gin and tonic water harmonise so well because their flavours complement each other and together create a flavour profile that is more than just the sum of its parts. [2-101]

Conclusion

Other evidence of a Gin and Tonic from the 1870s and 1880s also shows that it was drunk for pleasure rather than as a medicine. It was consumed to help with the heat and was associated with the English. [2-100] In the advertisements for tonic water, there is no recommendation for medicinal use, but it is simply presented as refreshment in the tropics. [2-102] We have already explained this in the post on tonic water.

It is not until the mid-1920s that the Gin and Tonic is referred to in the English press as anything other than a tropical drink. [2-114] In 1925, The Bystander reports on Cyril inviting his friend to escape the heat with “an iced gin and tonic consumed slowly in my club hard by“. [2-115]

The Gin & Tonic over the course of time

We don’t want to say much more about the further development of the Gin & Tonic, but only outline it briefly.

In the United Kingdom, both quinine and sugar had been rationalised due to the two world wars, so that little Gin & Tonic was drunk there in the early years of the 20th century. [1-69]

Even though Gin & Tonic was already known in America in the 1930s, it only became popular there after the Second World War. It was initially regarded as something exotic. Schweppes promoted it heavily in the 1950s and 1960s, so that it quickly became widespread. In the 1950s it became widely known and a standard drink. In 1953, Schweppes built its own factory in the USA to bottle the tonic water. [1-69] [4-320]

The Gin & Tonic reached the next stage of evolution in Spain, and today it can definitely be considered a Spanish national drink. A Spanish Gin & Tonic is served in a balloon glass to keep the drink cold longer and to highlight the flavours of the gin and garnish. Typically, one garnishes with the zest of lemon, orange or lime. Spices such as pepper, cardamom and coriander are also added. [1-73] [3] [4-320]

Sources
  1. Camper English: Tonic Water AKA G&T WTF. Second Printing, Rutte Distillery Edition, 2016
  2. Kim Walker & Mark Nesbitt: Just the Tonic. A natural history of Tonic Water. ISBN 978 1 84246 689 6. Kew 2019.
  3. https://www.dandywithlens.com/history-of-gin-and-tonic Bjørn Christian Finbråten: The history of Gin and Tonic, 6. November 2017.
  4. David Wondrich & Noah Rothbaum (Hrsg.): The Oxford Companion to Spirits & Cocktails. ISBN 9780199311132. Oxford University Press, 2022.
  5. https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sundarbans Sundarbans.
  6. https://archive.org/details/sportandtraveli02bagogoog/page/n199?q=%22gin+and+tonic%22 A. G. Bagot: Sport and travel in India and Central America. London, 1897.
  7. https://archive.org/details/travelandtalkmy02hawegoog/page/n208?q=%22gin+tonics%22 Hugh Reginald Haweis: Travel and talk. 1885-93-95. My hundred thousand miles of travel through America, Australia, Tasmania, Canada, New Zealand, Ceylon, and the paradises of the Pacific. Vol. 2. London, 1896.
  8. https://archive.org/details/straysport01browgoog/page/n150/mode/2up/search/%22gin+and+tonic%22?q=%22gin+and+tonic%22 James Moray Brown: Stray sport. Vol. 1. Edinburgh & London, 1893.
  9. https://archive.org/details/reminiscencesoft00raourich/page/88/mode/2up/search/%22gin+tonic%22?q=%22gin+tonic%22 Raoul: Reminiscences of twenty years’ pigsticking in Bengal. Calcutta, 1893.
  10. https://archive.org/details/saturdayreviewof5518unse/page/n319/mode/2up/search/tonic The Saturday Review of Politics, Literature, Science, and Art. No. 1428, Vol. 55. 10. March 1883.
  11. https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dubonnet Dubonnet.
  12. https://web.archive.org/web/20210310224005/https://www.gesetze-im-internet.de/aromv/BJNR016770981.html Aromenverordnung.
  13. https://archive.org/details/sunnylandsandse00wilkgoog/page/n80/mode/2up Hugh Wilkinson: Sunny lands and seas. A voyage in the SS. ‘Ceylon.’ Notes made during a five months’ tour in India – the Straits Settlements – Manila – China – Japan – the Sandwich Islands – and California. London, 1883.
  14. https://archive.org/details/chumsatalequeen02chumgoog/page/n280/mode/2up/search/%22gin+and+tonic%22?q=%22gin+and+tonic%22 Anonymus: Chums: A Tale of the Queen’s Navy. Vol. 1. London, 1882.
  15. https://www.countrylife.co.uk/food-drink/curious-questions-invented-gin-tonic-206058 Toby Keel, 19. October 2019: Curious Questions: Who invented the gin and tonic?
  16. https://books.google.de/books?redir_esc=y&hl=de&id=3JcEAAAAQAAJ&q=%22gin+tonic%22#v=snippet&q=%22gin%20tonic%22&f=false The Medical Press & Circular. 4. August 1875, page 88: Indian Medical Notes. – XLII.
  17. https://books.google.de/books?id=anaIDwAAQBAJ&pg=PA22&lpg=PA22&dq=%22nor+the+fascinations+of+a+gin+and+tonic+at+the+peg+table%22&source=bl&ots=-b6U114M9R&sig=ACfU3U2nN4EhYMoczCHMbmQEDn0aDduJdA&hl=de&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwjL15vdy8v4AhXWh_0HHaTmBNAQ6AF6BAgDEAM#v=onepage&q=%22nor%20the%20fascinations%20of%20a%20gin%20and%20tonic%20at%20the%20peg%20table%22&f=false Rudyard Kipling: The Cause of Humanity and Other Stories: Rudyard Kipling’s uncollected prose fictions. Cambridge University Press, 2018.
Gin & Tonic.
Gin & Tonic.

Historische Rezepte

1935 George Pillaert: Le Bar Américan. Seite 59. Gin and Tonic.

Burnett DRY Gin
Tonic minérale Water
1 Tranche de citron

1936 Frank A. Thomas: Wines, Cocktails and other Drinks. Seite 159. Gin and Tonic.

Like Gin and Ginger Beer except that Indian Quinine
Tonic Water is used instead of ginger beer, and a slice of
lemon is dropped into the glass. Popular in England and
in the East.

1939 Charles H. Baker, Jr.: The Gentleman’s Companion. Seite 39. Gin & Quinine Water, or “Gin & Tonic”.

GIN & QUININE WATER , or “GIN & TONIC”—ORIGINATED to
COMBAT FEVERS, REAL or ALLEGED, & which LATER BECAME an ESTAB­-
LISHED DRINK in INDIA & the TROPICAL BRITISH EAST, & STILL LATER
BECAME ACCEPTED over HERE by AMERICAN HOSTS WHO WANTED to
IMPRESS FOLK with HAVING COMBED the ORIENT
This is merely a gin highball, using dry or old Tom gin — either 1
or 1 1/2 jiggers — and filled up with chilled quinine tonic water. All
Americans, and some Britishers not so hidebound as to insist on
brassy, half-warm drinks, added 2 lumps of ice, and a twist of lime
peel. We like the latter style better, but must warn all those who em­-
brace this drink to remember it is a medicine and not primarily a
stimulant only. On more than one occasion we have temporarily
showed aberration on this subject, with the result that our ears rang
unmercifully and next day we felt like Rameses II, rechauffé. We
suggest from 2 to 4 drinks of gin and tonic as being plenty for any
one sitting.

1940 Anonymus: Professional Mixing Guide. Seite 33. Gin and Tonic.

Rub peel of fresh Lime or Lemon
around inside edge of 8oz glass. Pour
in 1 1/2 oz Dry Gin and add two cubes
of crystal-clear ice. Add thin slice of
Lime or Lemon, fill glass with Indian
Quinine Water. (This drink orig­-
inated in the tropics, but is now an
international favorite.)

1940 Crosby Gaige: Crosby Gaige’s Cocktail Guide. Seite 181. Gin and Tonic.

Here is a drink that deserves real consideration and
when bars and restaurants abandon their foul practice
of overcharging the customer for a bottle of tonic water
(which actually costs no more than the split of soda
that is served with a highball) this beverage will come
into what is known as “its own.” American saloon-
keepers, for reasons best known to themselves, suspect
a person who orders a gin and tonic of being at the
least a maharajah with pockets bulging with uncut
emeralds. Well that’s just a lot of nonsense that can
be easily corrected by raising a bit of polite hell the
next time you are given the needle.

Rub peel of fresh Lime or Lemon around inside edge
of 8-ounce glass. Pour in 1 1/2oz. Dry Gin and add two
cubes of ice. Add thin slice of Lime or Lemon, fill glass
with Quinine Water.

1944 Oscar Haimo: Cocktail Digest. Seite 56. Gin Tonic.

2 oz. Gin
2 cubes Ice
Slice of Lemon
Serve in tall glass
Fill with Canada Dry Quinine Water
Stir.

1946 Charles H. Baker, Jr.: The Gentleman’s Companion. Seite 39. Gin & Quinine Water, or “Gin & Tonic”.

GIN & QUININE WATER , or “GIN & TONIC”—ORIGINATED to
COMBAT FEVERS, REAL or ALLEGED, & which LATER BECAME an ESTAB­-
LISHED DRINK in INDIA & the TROPICAL BRITISH EAST, & STILL LATER
BECAME ACCEPTED over HERE by AMERICAN HOSTS WHO WANTED to
IMPRESS FOLK with HAVING COMBED the ORIENT
This is merely a gin highball, using dry or old Tom gin — either 1
or 1 1/2 jiggers — and filled up with chilled quinine tonic water. All
Americans, and some Britishers not so hidebound as to insist on
brassy, half-warm drinks, added 2 lumps of ice, and a twist of lime
peel. We like the latter style better, but must warn all those who em­-
brace this drink to remember it is a medicine and not primarily a
stimulant only. On more than one occasion we have temporarily
showed aberration on this subject, with the result that our ears rang
unmercifully and next day we felt like Rameses II, rechauffé. We
suggest from 2 to 4 drinks of gin and tonic as being plenty for any
one sitting.

1946 Oscar Haimo: Cocktail and Wine Digest. Seite 61. Gin Tonic.

2 oz Gin
2 cubes Ice
Slice of Lemon
Serve in tall glass
Fill with Canada Dry Quinine Water
Stir.

1947 A. Vermeys: Cocktails. Seite 45. Gin and Tonic.

1 morceau de glace; 1 verre de Gin. Remplir
avec Indian Tonic.

1950 Ted Shane: Authentic and Hilarious Bar Guide. Seite 143. Gin ‘n’ Tonic.

Rub peel of lime or lemon around Old-Fashioned glass,
pour in jigger dry gin, add two cubes of ice, thin slice of
lemon or lime, fill with quinine water — and feel your
fever recede.

1951 Anonymus: The Holiday Drink Book. Seite 22. Gin and Tonic.

Rub peel of fresh lime or lemon around
inside edge of 8 oz. glass. Pour in 1 1/2 oz.
dry gin and add two cubes of crystal-
clear ice. Add thin slice of lime or lemon,
fill glass with indian quinine water.

1951 Charles H. Baker, Jr.: The South American Gentleman’s Companion. Seite 38. Gin ‘n’ Tonic.

WE now LIST for YOUR CONSIDERATION the RIO JOCKEY
CLUB’S VERSION of the WORLD-FAMOUS—&, HAPPILY, INCREAS-
INGLY POPULAR, GIN-‘n’-TONIC

In shaker put 2 oz best dry gin, juice 1/4 lemon or whole small lime.
Rub 1″ down from lip of a Tom Collins glass with squeezed hull and
toss into shaker with ice. Shake hard to chill, strain into Collins glass,
add 3 ice cubes, a paper-thin slice of lemon or lime; and fill with
chilled Quinine Tonic Water. Stir-up gently to blend all and top with
3 drops of Angostura bitters. Drink with a straw if you so wish. We
don’t. This drink can be acid or not, to suit your whim; but no sugar
at all, ever. Also please note that it is not at its best unless served-up
very very cold indeed.

1951 Ted Saucier: Ted Saucier’s Bottoms Up. Seite 108. Gin and Tonic (American version).

1 1/2 oz. jigger gin
Slice lemon
Cracked ice
Put gin and ice in 8-oz. highball glass. Fill glass
with quinine water and add lemon slice.

1951 Ted Saucier: Ted Saucier’s Bottoms Up. Seite 108. Gin and Tonic (original).

This drink originated in the tropics, hut now is an international favorite.
1 1/2oz. dry gin
Thin slice lime or lemon
2 cubes crystal-clear ice
Rub peel of fresh lime or lemon around inside
edge of 8-oz. glass. Pour in gin and add ice. Add
lime or lemon slice and fill glass with quinine
water.

1952 Anonymus: Cocktails. Seite 124. Gin & Tonic.

Dans un tumbler:
Un gros morceau de glace,
Une tranche de citron,
Terminer avec du Schweppes Indian Tonic
et servir.

1953 David A. Embury: The Fine Art of Mixing Drinks. Seite 284. Gin ‘n’ Tonic.

This varies somewhat from the regular Collins
formula, as will be noted. Add 1 or 2 thin slices of lemon to 3 ounces of
gin in a Collins glass. Put 3 or 4 large cubes of ice in the glass and fill
it up with quinine water.
Remember that this is not merely a thirst quencher but also a tonic.
It does contain real quinine, and too much quinine, while not in-
toxicating in the ordinary sense, nevertheless can produce a head that
feels like a fully inflated balloon. Take due notice and govern yourself
accordingly.

1953 „Kappa“: Bartender’s Guide to Mixed Drinks. Seite 52. Gin and Tonic.

2 oz. Dry Gin
Cube of Ice
Fill glass with Quinine Tonic and stir. Use 12 oz.
Tom Collins glass.

1953 Leo Cotton: Old Mr. Boston Official Bartender’s Guide. Seite 70. Gin and Tonic.

2 oz. Old Mr. Boston Dry Gin
Cube of Ice
Fill glass with Quinine Tonic and stir.
Use 12 oz. Tom Collins glass.

1953 Marcel et Roger Louc: Cocktails et Grand Crus. Seite 61. Gin and Tonic Cocktail.

Dans un grand verre:
Un morceau de glace
Un verre de Gin
Compléter- avec Tonic Wa-
ter, ajouter une tranche de
citron.

1953 S. S. Field: The American Drinking Book. Seite 228. Gin and Tonic.

Put 2 ounces of Gin and a spiral of lemon peel in
a highball glass with ice cubes. Fill with Schweppes Quinine Water.
This medicine is taking its place among the
minor miracle drugs. For sudden revulsions of
the solistitial euphoria: two doses and plenty of
rest. Also excellent with Rum, or with Bourbon
and crushed mint.

1954 Marcel Pace: Nos Meilleures boissons. Gin & Tonic.

Dans le tumbler In tumbler
glace ice
7 cl. GIN 1 1/2 oz GIN
une rondelle de citron slice of lemon
emplir avec de l’Indian Tonic fill up with Indian Tonic

Marcel Pace: Nos Meilleures boissons. 1954. Gin & Tonic.
Marcel Pace: Nos Meilleures boissons. 1954. Gin & Tonic.

1954 Robert H. Loeb, Jr.: Nip Ahoy. Seite 32. Gin and Tonic.

Robert H. Loeb, Jr.: Nip Ahoy. 1954, page 32. Gin and Tonic.
Robert H. Loeb, Jr.: Nip Ahoy. 1954, page 32. Gin and Tonic.

1955 Jean Lupoiu: Cocktails. Seite 64. Gin and Tonic.

Dans un grand gobelet:
1 morceau de glace, 1 verre de SEAGER’S
Gin, remplir avec Schweppes Indian Tonic.
Mélanger et servir.

1956 Patrick Gavin Duffy: The Official Mixer’s Manual. Seite 129. Gin and Tonic.

Place 2 jiggers Dry Gin in a
highball glass with 2 or 3 cubes
of ice and 1 slice of Lemon. Fill
with Tonic Water.

1957 Lawrence Blochman: Here’s How. Seite 119. Gin and Tonic.

2 ounces dry gin 1⁄2 lime (juice and peel)
. Quinine water
Pour the gin over several ice cubes in a 10-ounce glass,
squeeze the lime and drop in the peel, fill with the cold
tonic water.

1960 Anonymus: Recetas para cocteles. Seite 35. Gin Tonic.

En vaso de 10 onzas, pedazo de hielo
Una lasca de limón
1 1/4 onza de Ginebra Seca
Agua Tonic

1964 Anonymus: Peter Pauper’s Drink Book. Seite 42. Gin and Tonic.

In recent years this has become a widely-
popular summer drink. Part of its popularity
is due to the ease of preparation. Part is due
to the fact that its flavor does not become tire­
some, being subtle and unobtrusive. Part is
due to its dryness, which makes it a better
before-dinner drink than sweeter creations.
Into each tall glass — at least 8-ounce size —
put ice-cubes to nearly fill. Pour over them
1 1/2 ounces of gin, or more; then fill glass with
quinine water as supplied by any of the well-
known bottlers of soda. A slice of lime, a
cherry, or a sprig of mint is a gracious addi­-
tion—and, since the drink is practically color­-
less, gives a touch of color too. Serve with or
without straws.

1965 Aladar von Wesendonk: 888 Cocktails. Seite 124. Gin and Tonic.

wird wie ein Soda gemischt und
mit einer Zitronenschale serviert.
Auch Wodka, Tequila, Genever
und Steinhäger schmecken mit
Tonic vorzüglich

1965 Anonymus: John de Kuyper’s Complete Guide to Cordials. Seite 18. Gin and Tonic (Dutch Style).

2 ounces De Kuyper Geneva Gin
Quinine water
Pour gin over ice cubes, fill with quinine
water, stir. Garnish: Lemon slice or lime
wedge.

1965 Harry Schraemli: Manuel du bar. Seite 406. Gin and Tonic.

Mettre dans un tumbler quelques dés de glace, 1 verre de gin (50 g)
et finir de remplir avec de la tonic-water. Ajouter une tranche ou 1/8 de
citron.

1965 Robert London & Anne London: Cocktails and Snacks. Seite 85. Gin and Tonic.

Rub peel of lime or lemon around inside edge of an 8-ounce highball
glass. Pour in 1/2 ounces dry gin. Add ice cubes and a slice of lime or
lemon. Fill with quinine water.

1966 Harry Schraemli: Le roi du bar. Seite 94. Gin and Tonic.

Tumbler. Quelques dés de glace, 1 verre
de gin (50 g). Tonic-water, tranche de ci- ­
tron.

1966 Oscar Haimo: Cocktail and Wine Digest. Seite 61. Gin Tonic.

2 cubes Ice. 1 1/2 oz. Gin
Slice of Lime or Lemon. Serve in tall glass.
Fill with Canada Dry Quinine Water. Stir.

1968 Anonymus: The Dieter’s Drink Book. Seite 33. Gin & Tonic.

1/2oz. gin, 80 proof
4 oz. quinine water
1/2 tbs. lime juice
Pour gin over ice cubes in highball glass. Add
chilled tonic. Garnish with lime slice.

1969 Mario Kardahi & Raul Echenique: El arte de la exquisitez y del buen beber. Seite 353. Gin Tonic.

Refrescado. Preparar y servir en un vaso de trago largo.
50 gramos de Dry Gin.
Completar con una botellita de Agua Tónica.
Una rodaja de limón con cáscara.

1972 Anonymus: Recipes – Wines and Spirits. Seite 15. Gin and Tonic.

To make 1 tall drink
2 ice cubes
3 ounces gin
4 to 6 ounces cold quinine water
1 slice lemon or lime
A highball glass
Place the ice cubes in a highball glass and add the gin. Fill the glass with
quinine water and garnish with a slice of lemon or lime. Do not stir.
In récent years, vodka and tonic has become a popular variation.

1972 Leo Cotton: Old Mr. Boston. Seite 40. Gin and Tonic.

2 oz. Old Mr. Boston Dry Gin
Cube of Ice
Fill glass with quinine water and
stir. Use 12 oz. Tom Collins glass.

1972 Trader Vic: Trader Vic’s Bartender’s Guide. Seite 91. Gin and Tonic.

1/2 lime
1 1/2 ounces gin
Quinine water
Squeeze lime juice into 12-ounce chimney glass filled with ice
cubes; drop in spent shell. Add gin. Fill with quinine water.
Stir very gendy.

1973 Anonymus: 500 Ways to Mix Drinks. Seite 48. Gin and Tonic Highball.

(as served at Shepherd’s Ho-
tel, Cairo, Egypt)
1 jigger dry gin
1 thin slice of lemon or wedge
of lime
1, 2 or 3 cubes of ice
Pour into glass and fill with
quinine water.

1973 Oscar Haimo: Cocktail and Wine Digest. Seite 60. Gin Tonic.

2 cubes Ice, 1 1/2 oz. Gin or Liquor Desired
Slice of Lime or Lemon. Service in Highball glass
Fill with Canada Dry Tonic Water. Stir.

1976 Harry Craddock: The Savoy Cocktail Book. Seite 76. Gin and Tonic.

Pour into highball glass 2
oz. Dry Gin over ice cubes
and fill with quinine water.
Stir.

1977 Stan Jones: Jones’ Complete Barguide. Seite 290. Gin & Tonic.

Hiball Glass Build
1-1/2 oz gin
Fill with tonic, ice
Squeeze of lime

2011 Helmut Adam, Jens Hasenbein, Bastian Heuser: Cocktailian 1. Seite 234. Gin & Tonic. 5 cl Gin; 1 Limettenviertel (optional); 15 cl Tonic.

2011 Jim Meehan: Das Geheime Cocktail-Buch. Seite 132. Gin & Tonic. 10,5 cl Soda; 6 cl Tanqueray gin; 2 cl Tonicsirup; Garnitur: Limettenschale.

2013 Victoria Bar: Die Schule der Trunkenheit. Seite 248. Gin Tonic. 5 cl Gin; 15 cl Tonic; Garnitur: Zitrusfruchtachtel oder Zitrusfruchtschale.

2014 Jeffrey Morgenthaler: The Bar Book. Seite 62. Gin and Tonic. 60 ml London dry or Plymouth gin; 15 ml quinine syrup; 45 ml soda water; garnish: lime wedge.

2016 André Darlington & Tenaya Darlington: The New Cocktail Hour. Seite 167. Gin and Tonic. 60 ml gin (Junipero or Blue Coat); 90 ml tonic water, or 30 ml tonic syrup and 2-3 ounces seltzer; garnish: lime wedge.

2016 Sasha Petraske: Regarding Cocktails. Seite 163. Gin & Tonic. 60 ml gin; 180 ml tonic water; garnish: lme wedge.

2017 Jim Meehan: Meehan’s Bartender Manual. Seite 217. Gin And Tonic. 4 oz. East Imperial Burma tonic water; 2 oz. Plymouth gin; garnish: 1 lime wedge.

2018 Alex Day, Nick Fauchald, David Kaplan: Cocktail Codex. Seite 217. Gin and Tonic. 2 ounces London dry gin; 4 ounces tonic water; garnish: lime wedge.

explicit capitulum
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About

Hi, I'm Armin and in my spare time I want to promote bar culture as a blogger, freelance journalist and Bildungstrinker (you want to know what the latter is? Then check out "About us"). My focus is on researching the history of mixed drinks. If I have ever left out a source you know of, and you think it should be considered, I look forward to hearing about it from you to learn something new. English is not my first language, but I hope that the translated texts are easy to understand. If there is any incomprehensibility, please let me know so that I can improve it.

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